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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    SWAMI Xpress  ›  What is meant by "pecorino cheese" on SWAMI?
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What is meant by "pecorino cheese" on SWAMI?  This thread currently has 1,170 views. Print Print Thread
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TJ
Saturday, November 21, 2009, 10:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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As far as I understand, "pecorino" means "sheep".  I've never seen cheese labeled simply "pecorino".  I have seen "pecorino romano". "Romano cheese" is a superfood for me, but "pecorino cheese" is a black dot.  So which one is "pecorino romano cheese"?  Are all sheep cheeses to be considered a black dot?
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Lola
Saturday, November 21, 2009, 11:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I believe so


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Cristina
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 3:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Well, I am hoping that Peccorino refers to the way the cheese is made which can be done with either sheep or cow's milk.  At least in Australia (as well as other countries as seen below), Peccorino cheese  is sold without specifying that it is made from sheep.  On checking the websites below, they are actually advertising some as being made from cow's milk.  So I hope this one will be like the Feta cheese that can be made from either goat or cow's milk, but it has the same rating in our lists as Feta.

So, whether from sheep or cow, I hope that 'Peccorino' is rated the same in our food lists.

http://www.lacasa.com.au/qa.htm#8
Quoted Text
8. Why is La Casa Del Formaggio's Fresh Pecorino soft and moist, I thought Pecorino was a hard cheese like Parmesan?
La Casa Del Formaggio's Fresh Pecorino is very different from a hard, aged Pecorino. Hard Pecorino is typically matured for at least 12 months. Most traditional Pecorino is made from sheeps milk and aged which is why it is hard and sharp. La Casa's fresh pecorino is a pecorino style based on the same techniques but using cows milk and packed fresh. The freshness of the cheese and the lower solids level in cows milk (compared to that from sheep) is why La Casa Del Formaggio's Pecorino is soft and creamy.


Websites advertising Peccorino cheese made from cow's milk:
http://www.clover.co.za/content/235/pecorino/
I get access to this one in my local store:
http://www.trueorganic.com.au/products.php?pid=48
and to this fresh one:
http://www.lacasa.com.au/freshpecorino.htm


PS: Regarding your question as to Peccorino and Romano being the same, they are not, they are two different types of cheeses, one is the plain Peccorino which can be fresh or matured and the other one is the Peccorino Romano, which is similar to Parmesan cheese in texture.  




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Lola
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 4:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Peccoro is Italian for sheep

so a peccorino cow s milk cheese shouldn t actually be called that.....
at least you are warned in advance! lol
once you read the ingredients.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Jenny
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 10:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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pecorino (sheep) is VERY expensive in the health shop in Canberra whereas pecorino (cows) in Coles etc is not so expensive.



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Cristina
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 10:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Jenny
pecorino (sheep) is VERY expensive in the health shop in Canberra whereas pecorino (cows) in Coles etc is not so expensive.


True, and the ingredients do not specify sheep or cow milk, normally they just say 'pasteurized' milk or ' italian style cheese with a tangy flavor, from australian dairy farmers'.  It is only with further investigation on the net when we manage to 'take the wool out of the cow'.  




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Chandon
Monday, November 23, 2009, 1:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have never noticed pecorino being used to describe a cow's milk cheese. I know that at Whole Foods, it seems to specifically describe a sheep's milk cheese that is fairly similar in texture to manchego cheese. Hard, but not superhard. Then there is Romano cheese, which is a specific pecorino cheese. Sometimes the word pecorino precedes Romano and sometimes it doesn't, but yes, it is a sheep's "version" more or less of Parmesan, with a different taste, of course. There are many other sheep's milk cheeses there but the name "Pecorino" doesn't appear on them. I think "Pecorino" often denotes a variety of sheep's milk cheese and then literally, one could say all sheep's milk cheese is pecorino cheese. So, it's a bit confusing.
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TJ
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 4:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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So what is my take-away from this?  Thumbs up or down on Pecorino Romano?
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jayneeo
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 6:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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On my swami (this could be the takeaway....) it says I can have parmesan and pecorino romano, which are similar in use and flavor.
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Lloyd
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 7:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from TJ
So what is my take-away from this?  Thumbs up or down on Pecorino Romano?


I would treat pecorino romano as a pecorino. Just my take.

Hopefully you have enough other cheeses to choose among that it isn't that big an issue.
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Cristina
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 8:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Further clarification on the interpretation of our food lists regarding Peccorino wording:

Case 1 - Treat Peccorino as the source of the cheese, aka sheeps milk
In which case if Peccorino is listed as a beneficial:
= Eat any type of cheese made of sheep's milk.  In this case any sheep's milk cheese is beneficial. So even if in my avoids lists I have blue cheeses, or hard cheeses, if they are made with sheeps milk, like Great Britains Beeleigh blue (see link below listing sheeps cheeses ), I should be able to eat them as beneficials for me.

If Peccorino is listed as an avoid:
= avoid any type of cheese made of sheep's milk.  If in my bene lists I have blue cheeses, soft cheeses or hard cheeses, if they are made of sheeps milk, I should avoid them all.

Case 2, Treat Peccorino as another type of cheese
In which case, if listed as a beneficial:
= Include that cheese that it says Peccorino for that beneficial, if Romano is an avoid, Peccorino Romano is also an avoid, while Pecorino (type only) is the Beneficial

If listed as an avoid:
Avoid only the cheese labelled Peccorino cheese, but if Romano is a bene, then Peccorino Romano should also be a bene.

I do not favour any for the other, I just want to clarify this so we all have a base from now on to move on.

Lola, Lloyd, c_Sharp and experienced moderators, what is your take?
  

http://www.artisanalcheese.com/searchprodfilter.asp?ad2=Sheep&pagenumber=1





Revision History (2 edits)
Cristina  -  Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 11:51pm
Cristina  -  Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 11:49pm
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Lola
Tuesday, November 24, 2009, 10:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
Serotyping With Amplification, Modification, Interpretation


I d do just that!
translate your SFs and modify accordingly!
unless specifics gave you trouble along the way.....then I d think of tweaking.....

I don t have that dilemma, cause for me, all dairy is out, so there s nothing in that specific food group, to worry about!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Squirrel
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 1:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I had pecorino and romano added back in with SWAMI. I bought some pecorino romano for the first time for years, had a beeeeaaauuuuuutiful rash reaction with liver congestion and auditory hallucinations (a grand way of saying I heard things that weren't there) I stopped eating it. Problem solved.

But I digress. I see your problem, and I thought the same when I went cheese-shopping, but luckily for me they were both "superfoods" (not   )

I read the info on dairy very carefully, and it was all about how the milk was processed, using the whey rather than the curd in my case. Have a look at the dairy description and see whether that helps? I would look at the rest of the list too and see what else is on there. If pecorino romano is made in a different way or from different ingredient from the other superfoods then I'd avoid it.

It would be nice to get some clarification from Dr. D though.


Note to self: I am me, and also an O-nonnie - I'm allowed not to fit the mould.
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TJ
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 1:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cristina, I like what you had to say about this!  I think I'll consider "pecorino" as an indication of source.  Which is fine by me, since sheep's cheese is very expensive....  Hopefully I can find some other kind of romano cheese!  Squirrel, I agree it would be nice to have the Dr.'s input on just what he meant here when he said "pecorino".

Language is useful because it solves more problems than it creates.
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Chandon
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 3:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Well, Roquefort is a sheep cheese I'm supposed to avoid, but Pecorino and Romano are cheeses I'm supposed to eat. I feel that Italian Pecorino, which tends to be a firm cheese, is what is meant, but sheep-based varieties with their own name, such as Roquefort are cheeses I should avoid.
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Cristina
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 4:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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In Australia Peccorino comes in two forms: firm and soft.  One is good for grating, creamier colour, the other one good for crumbing, easier to slice and is white colour.  Then it is the Peccorino Romano which is a different taste again, firm type, like the firm Peccorino, but more similar to Parmesan in taste.  They are all made of cow's milk though.  

I did find a sheep's milk cheese at the shop called:  Organic Picasso's sheeps cheese.  I have not opened it yet.  It is firm, but not quite as firm as Peccorino or Romano, but definately not soft.  Colour is in between white and butter cream, a lot lighter than the Peccorino or Romano cheeses, but not quite as white as the soft Peccorino cheese.

If Peccorino means the source of the cheese, then why did they not use the English translation: sheep's cheeses?  it would have been so much easier!!! Then I would have know for sure that eating this Piccaso cheese will be OK.

As it is, like Lola recommended, I eat them with caution.  So far I know that the Peccorinos (had and soft) and Pecorino Romano are OK for us, we have been eating them for a while without issues.  I now have to try this Picasso one to see how it is.

Thanks everyone for your interest in this subject, i will eventually post a link to it from the stickied 'Food Choices for All thread' to make it easier for people to refer to it.   Thanks TJ for initiating this.

Everyone, keep on giving us your take on this subject.  




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Lloyd
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 1:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chandon
Well, Roquefort is a sheep cheese I'm supposed to avoid, but Pecorino and Romano are cheeses I'm supposed to eat. I feel that Italian Pecorino, which tends to be a firm cheese, is what is meant, but sheep-based varieties with their own name, such as Roquefort are cheeses I should avoid.


Roquefort is a mold, a variety of blue cheese.
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Chandon
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 2:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes, but the French are strict about the "appellation" of true Roquefort. It must be made in the Roquefort region and it is made with sheep's milk.  
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Chandon
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 2:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Roquefort is one of the cheeses using the penicillin molds (as all blue cheeses and brie/camembert style cheeses are). From Wikipedia (which mentions butyric acid!):

Roquefort (US: /ˈroʊkfərt/, UK [rɒkˈfɔr], French: [ʀɔkfɔʀ]; from Occitan rcafrt [ˌrɔkɔˈfɔɾt]), sometimes spelled Rochefort in English, is a sheep milk blue cheese from the south of France, and together with Bleu d'Auvergne, Stilton and Gorgonzola is one of the world's best-known blue cheeses[citation needed]. Though similar cheeses are produced elsewhere, European cheese law dictates that only those cheeses aged in the natural Combalou caves of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon may bear the name Roquefort, as it is a recognised geographical indication, or has a protected designation of origin.

The cheese is white, tangy, crumbly and slightly moist, with distinctive veins of green mould. It has characteristic odor and flavor with a notable taste of butyric acid; the green veins provide a sharp tang. The overall flavor sensation begins slightly mild, then waxes sweet, then smoky, and fades to a salty finish. It has no rind; the exterior is edible and slightly salty. A typical wheel of Roquefort weighs between 2.5 and 3 kilograms, and is about 10 cm thick. Each kilogram of finished cheese requires about 4.5 litres of milk.
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Lloyd
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 2:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Right. The point being that not all sheep cheese will be diamond/avoid just as not all cow cheese will be diamon/avoid. The mold is an important factor that would seperate the rating from other sheep milk cheese.
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Cristina
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 5:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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So in other words, the type of cheese takes preference over the source of cheese.  




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Lloyd
Thursday, November 26, 2009, 6:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Cristina
So in other words, the type of cheese takes preference over the source of cheese.  


In some cirsumstances. I would not presume that 'pecorino romano' should be treated as romano based on that. Blue cheeses have a very obvious reason to consider different treatment irrespective of the source of the milk.  

Really, it comes back to what I have pointed out many, many times:

It comes down to what the source cheese was that the USDA Nutrient Database uses. One might be able to infer that by looking at the macro and micronutrient breakdowns for the various possibilities and that is what drives the rating unless there is a lectin issue or a methylation factor or some other known modifier based on blood type or GenoType. Blue cheeses would be one obvious example of this non-nutrient modification.
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Cristina
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What did NAP or the rating team used at the moment they were rating the cheese?  Regarding Romano, like in Australia, they would have had the option of using the original imported italian cheese from sheep's milk  or the same type home manufactured cheese mostly made with cows milk as per following information:

Quoted Text
In America, most Romano cheese is made with cow’s milk. This version would be called Vaccino Romano in Italy. Occasionally, the highly flavored Caprino Romano—goat’s milk cheese—is also available.


Quoted Text
The manufacture of Romano in the United States is governed by Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 133, Part 183, which specifies that the cheese must be a minimum of five months of age, it must have at least 38% milk-fat and must not contain more than 34% moisture.


From:
http://www.foodproductdesign.com/articles/2007/05/rediscovering-romano.aspx

Other links:
http://jds.fass.org/cgi/reprint/18/11/773.pdf

In the meantime we are, as adviced above to treat it as unknown and trial it with caution.  Good tasting ...





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Cristina  -  Thursday, November 26, 2009, 11:30pm
Cristina  -  Thursday, November 26, 2009, 11:27pm
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