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Research on food choices for all  This thread currently has 44,855 views. Print Print Thread
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Cristina
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
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Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Research on Tubers and their toxicity level:

Nice illustrations on various tubers:
http://www.foodsubs.com/Tubers.html

List of toxic plants and their toxic ratings:
http://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/ce/king/PoisPlant/Tox-COM.htm
Elephant's ear     Colocasia spp.     = Taro plant
Elephant's ear     Xanthosoma spp.     = Malanga plant




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Lola
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Sa Bon Nim
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malanga, Oreja de elefante, or bituca

elephant ears is pretty abundant down here


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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Cristina
Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks Lola, edited post.  




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What a busy forum here,   thanks for all the excellent research Cristina.  

Jenny, sorry about your cat  , I'm sure he had a great life with you as his Mum.  A food crawl is a great idea! Now I know what to look for, thanks Cristina for the great picture.  


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

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Cristina
Monday, November 23, 2009, 12:57am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Jenny
Since my gorgeous moggie died recently I have a redundant carry cage which is now going to serve as a plant raising venue for small pots, and maybe my remaining pimento seeds will have a chance to germinate and thrive there.

Quoted Text
Quoted from Symbi:
Jenny, sorry about your cat


Ahh, I was not sure what moggie was, read the post in a hurry, I thought Jenny was talking about some exotic plant!!  Sorry Jenny!  I second Symbi about you being a great mum too!!     





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Cristina
Sunday, December 13, 2009, 11:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Research on Kudzu:


Quoted Text

Relevant information:

    Active Ingredients:    
    Kudzu root contains: Phytoestrogens including the isoflavonoids genistein, daidzein, formononetin and biochanin-A. Kudzu root is also rich in isoflavone glycosides, such as daidzin and puerarin.  Depending on its growing conditions, the total isoflavone content varies from 1.77-12.0%, with puerarin in the highest concentration, followed by daidzin and daidzein. Kudzu also contains many other flavonoid-type antioxidants and is rich in protein.


http://www.florahealth.com/flo.....tm#ActiveIngredients

Quoted Text
    
    Women with estrogen receptor-positive tumors should exercise caution in the use of daidzein/dadzin-containing supplements and should only use them if they are recommended and monitored by a physician.

    Daidzein/daidzin intake has been associated with hypothyroidism in some.


http://170.107.206.70/drug_info/nmdrugprofiles/nutsupdrugs/dai_0089.shtml

Quoted Text

    Kudzu: Kudzu is an herb that has been used in Chinese medicine for many years. Traditionally, kudzu has been used to treat hives. However, there is currently no scientific evidence on the safety and efficacy for this use.
    No well-designed studies on the long-term effects of kudzu are available. Avoid if allergic or hypersensitive to Pueraria lobata or members of the Fabaceae/Leguminosae family. Use cautiously with blood thinners and blood pressure-lowering agents, hormones, antiarrhythmics, benzodiazepines, bisphosphonates, diabetes medications, drugs that are metabolized by the liver's cytochrome P450 enzymes, mecamylamine, neurologic agents, and methotrexate. Avoid if pregnant or breastfeeding.


http://www.wellness.com/reference/allergies/latex-allergy/prevention-and-treatment





Revision History (1 edits)
Lola  -  Sunday, December 13, 2009, 8:53pm
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mel1111
Saturday, March 20, 2010, 1:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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part 2 Huon, Australia Q & A on farmed salmon
Q.What are the fish fed?
A. Turning to the natural resources being used to feed our fish, farmed salmon in common with all other meat producing animals must receive balanced nutrition if they are to develop normally, remain healthy and provide a high-quality end product. The diets that we buy are made for us specifically. Tasmania is a unique environment and our fish are truly a special breed, so our diets here have to meet some specific requirements. Our diets have to supply two main requirements; firstly they need to provide the fish with enough energy to live and thrive; secondly they must supply all the nutrients (proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals) to grow. After many years of research we have a pretty good understanding of what the relative amounts and balances of each nutrient need to be in the range of environmental conditions we experience. This generates a specification for our diets for each stage of the salmons growth and our suppliers manufacture to this specification. There is some flexibility in which ingredients go into the recipe to deliver that specified feed but all ingredients must go through a battery of quality checks before they can be used. Aside from fishmeal and fish oil, our diets may contain wheat, soya derivatives, corn gluten, meat by-product meal, blood meal and vitamin and mineral supplements very similar to those taken by people. In fact most of the ingredients we use are commonly used in the pet-food industry and our diets look very like dry pet food albeit with a very different nutrient profile, higher in energy and more digestible.

All of the ingredients combine to provide all of the nutrients that our fish need to grow properly in Tasmanian conditions. I will give an indication below of the main contribution each ingredient type makes to the diet and why this is important to the fish:-

1)      Fishmeal source of protein and oil in the diet, very balanced source of essential amino acids helping the fish to grow and repair, enhances palatability of the diet.

2)      Fish oil source of oil in the diet, used by the fish for energy, good source of marine omega 3 oils which have direct health benefits for fish and are stored in the flesh of the fish making our product a very healthy food choice for people.

3)      Wheat source of carbohydrate in the feed to give the pellet structure, not used very much by the fish they make carbohydrate by digesting and converting protein mainly.

4)      Vegetable glutens source of protein in the diet, good source of some essential amino acids helping the fish to grow and repair.

5)      Blood and meat and bone meal source of protein in the diet, very digestible source of essential amino acids, especially Histidine that are very important during summer.

Salmon are amongst the most efficient converters of protein and energy much better than birds and land animals. Im sure that youve read articles stating that it takes many kilos of capture fishery species to produce 1 kg of salmon. In reality on an edible flesh basis it takes around 1Kg of anchovies to produce 840g of Huon salmon and we are working hard to reduce this further. Why is our number lower than the numbers reported in the media? Often the numbers reported are many years out of date or come from sources that have taken worst case views and used them to argue a particular point.

Q. Do you use antibiotics with the fish.  Is this a standard practice?
A. I can confirm that we have not used any antibiotics in our marine farming operations for almost two years. We put our fish first and are committed to preventative health measures. We produce the highest quality Tasmanian salmon for Australian and International markets and we are proud of our animal husbandry and welfare record. Our improved husbandry and breeding program is eliminating even the occasional use of antibiotics on our production farms - a critical part of what we call the Huon Method.  

In the past when Huon has had to medicate individual pens it was for short periods of 10 days or less.  Even then antibiotics were only used under the strict prescription and supervision of a veterinarian and only in response to specific isolated health issues, as with all livestock reared for food production. In keeping with the Australian and New Zealand food safety standards and world's best practice in aquaculture, any fish treated with antibiotics are not harvested until the antibiotic has cleared their system. So if antibiotics were ever used we made sure that there were no residues in the fish that we harvested.

Looking ahead we are actively supporting and funding vaccine development in co-operation with other farming companies to further help our fish deal with environmental stressors and opportunistic bacteria that can make them unwell.

I hope that this goes some way to helping you make your judgement on whether to buy Huon Tasmanian salmon.

Please contact me if you need any further information or if you want me to expand on any of the points covered above.

Thank you,
Danika

Customer Service Support Officer   |   Huon Aquaculture Group Pty Ltd



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mel1111
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Farmed Salmon in Australia - and Huon Australia Q & A part 1
I have been researching Australian farmed Salmon.  I thought that i would write to the company whose product i had previously enjoyed eating the most, Huon, (previously called Springs).  They sent me a detailed response to my queries,  pls find (an edited version) it below.  I am wondering if anyone has comments on the Huon farming approach described.  If you have the time/interest it would be great if you could pls take a look and comment.

It sounds like this farmed salmon product could be ok for us to use even though it is farmed, anyway i am hoping so!! especially as we are unable to purchase wild salmon.

Their are a number of threads i have found in other forums which helped me formulate my questions to Huon.
(Posted By: joachim, AB- Date: Friday, 19 October 2001, at 2:11 a.m.)  http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archived/config.pl?read=124404 is extremely critical of farmed salmon.  , the practice Huon describes is rather different to the North American practices that are described by Joachim.

One specific concern i did not ask about was the colour of the fish.  but there is considerable discussion of this issue in another thread http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1259637147/. So i have written back to them to ask them about dye.

Recently i was in Aldi, and i saw and bought the Salmon which comes from Marlborough Sounds in NZ so i am interested in investigating that now------------------------------------------------------------------
Q from me & A from Huon - (Note that Huon produce fresh salmon & smoked salmon.)

Q. is fresh wild salmon available in Australia
A.I agree that youll find it difficult to find fresh wild Atlantic salmon in Sydney, its only caught in very limited commercial coastal net fisheries on the North sea coasts and by recreational anglers in the northern late summer and autumn (July-October). The wild stocks of this fish have been in decline for almost sixty years well before salmon farming started. The seasonality of supply and the scarcity have often led to unscrupulous retailers passing off farmed salmon as wild fish to exploit a perception that wild fish were somehow more sustainable, flavoursome or in some way better.

Youre absolutely right in that Springs was rebranded as Huon smoked salmon a couple of years ago. Its definitely the most authentic smoked salmon that is produced in Australia. We use traditional kiln smoking for at least 24 hours to let the smoke infuse gently and preserve the delicate flavour of our fish.


Ive tried to answer your specific concerns and questions below, we are in the process of providing general information on the web site on the topics youve raised but I thought it might help to cover these issues in my reply.

Q. Would you say your farmed fresh salmon differs from US practice.   (I note that your website talks of fallowing etc.)
A. Its a little difficult to do a direct comparison with overseas producers as the environment and conditions that they farm under are different to ours. We believe our salmon are superior because we put the fish first. Huon farms have the lowest stocking densities in the world, in fact the fish occupy less than 1% of the volume of our net pens. We maintain clean nets, a healthy environment and work hard to reduce stress, all to ensure healthy fish.  Huon's own selective breeding programme produces fish which are ideally suited to our Tasmanian conditions. We have a very strict regulatory framework that ensures that our operations are sustainable. We must report production inputs and outputs per hectare and our farms are surveyed by the government on an annual basis to verify that we are working within the environmental impact limits allowed under our lease conditions. All farm sites in Tasmania are leased from the Department of Primary Industry, Water and the Environment and must operate with no detectable impact on the sea bed within 35 metres of the lease footprint. These are amongst the tightest standards in the world.

Q. Would you say your farmed fresh salmon differs other locally produced (eg Tassal)?  
A. Again we believe that we produce the best fish in the world. Our fish a selected from our pioneering pedigree broodstock so that we start with high quality juvenile fish (smolts) reared in state-of-the art freshwater hatcheries that grow the fish under ideal conditions whilst having minimal environmental impact. The smolts are transferred to our pristine marine sites, fed balanced diets made to our specific formulations, protected from predators and carefully nurtured. They respond to our care by growing strongly, with minimal variation, good deep body shape and excellent flesh colour and texture. The are harvested at night and processed in the early morning  so that they arrive on the market a day earlier than other producers.  

Q. What happened to fish waste in the pens?
A. Our salmon need a maximum of 6.9Kg of fish feed to grow to 5Kg.
There are two types of waste that we need to consider. The first is waste feed. We use a patented feed management system that we helped develop in the mid nineties. The system uses a sensor which indirectly measures the appetite of the fish, this means that the fish tell us when they are hungry and the sensor controls a feed distributor that delivers an amount of feed to satisfy the appetite of the fish without wastage. Salmon unlike us will not eat more than they need to live and grow so by ensuring that no extra feed is fed we are eliminating the risk of feed waste.

The second type of waste is excretory products. Fish digestion works in a completely different way to humans or farm animals. Fish excretory products pose no danger whatsoever to humans because they do not contain E-coli or any of the other potentially pathogenic bacteria or viruses that are found in human or farm sewage. After all, fish have been swimming about in the sea for countless millennia and the marine ecosystem has evolved to deal with their excretory products as part of the natural cycle of life in the oceans. The vast majority of the small amount of nitrogenous waste produced by fish is actually excreted from the gills of the fish as ammonia and it dissolves rapidly in the water and is carried away by tides and currents. Having said that salmon farms do produce some organic waste and it can have a negative impact on the seabed directly under the cages. This is overseen by the Marine Farming Branch of the state governments Department of Primary Industry, Water and the Environment. All Huon farms are monitored and if there is any detectable impact from our operations within 35m (less than the diameter of one of our large pens) of the edge of our lease area then we must stop operations at that pen site.

It is also worth pointing out that Huon farms are removed or fallowed for several months of the year and this allows the seabed to revert back to exactly how it was before the farm was ever there. Our footprint is tiny and easily reversed. The very definition of sustainable farming.

Q. Are the fish ever shot?
A. Not sure what you mean by this. Our farming systems and methods are built to ensure that the fish live as stress-free a life as possible. If your question relates to how we harvest our fish then we use a specially designed system to kill the fish by percussive stunning. The system was invented in Australia and again we were involved in the development phase. It has since become the worlds best practise harvesting system and has won an award from the RSPCA in the UK for the humane manner in which it operates.  


Mel1111
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Lola
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seems all this farmed salmon species need is yoga for their blood glucose and viscosity levels!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Symbi
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Thanks for your research Mel!

Great to see this thread is back to life.  I should try some salmon soon now it does sound good.  


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

Family - O+ DH and DD (both hunter-ish)
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teri
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mel1111, I'm so glad you've done some research on this subject. I am also a believer that farmed salmon is a very healthy food. Everything that you've found out about farming practices in Australia is also done here in BC. Regarding antibiotics, the majority of fish make it to market without ever receiving any treatment at all. Only sick fish are treated, not the whole site, and only for a short period of time, as you say, "10 days", and cleared before harvest. The industry here is very highly regulated, much more so than farmed land animals in North America. I won't eat non-organic beef or poultry, but I won't hesitate to eat farmed fish from BC. The whole campaign against farmed salmon in North America is entirely a political one and based on skewed data. It's all about money. If anyone cares to delve deep enough into the subject (bypassing mainstream media) that is what they will find. I have no doubt that if Dr. D had a fresh whole farmed salmon from BC (or Australia) in front of him to examine, he'd give his approval.


I'm onto you, 'euphoria'
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For Aussie budget conscious beef eaters, you may be interested to know.  Big Surprise  !  I got preservative-free beef sausages from Woolworths the other day.  That was after asking a butcher about preservatives in sausages, he said, "they all have them and the meat comes with the preservatives already in as well".  

I'd heard that some gourmet butchers make them preservative free, but didn't expect to find them in Woolies tho!  They also have gluten free sausages and lots of meats and flavours as well (with preservatives tho).

Here are the ingredients:
Beef (71.5%), Water, Rice Flour, Salt, Mineral Salts (450, 451, 452), Dextrose (Tapioca or Maize), Food Acids (262, 331), Soy Protein, Natural Flavouring, Antioxidants (301, 316), Spices, Dehydrated Vegetables, Natural Colour (160c), Vegetable Oil, Edible Collagen Casing.

Checking the ingredients in the MBM food additives guide (http://mbm.net.au/health/guide.htm)
E262      Sodium acetate and anydrous, ok
E331      Sodium citrates, ok
Mineral salts ok
Maize - dodgy for some
Soy - dodgy for some
Natural flavouring - could be MSG?

E301      Sodium ascorbate, ok
E316      Sodium erythorbate, no known effects

E160(c)      Paprika extract, capsanthin, capsorubin      Capsanthin, found in paprika extract, is a red to orange coloured spice derived from the pods and seeds of the red pepper (Capsicum annuum). Contains vitamins A, B, C and traces of Zn, Cu, Se, Co, Mo, etc. Paprika extract also contains capsanthin. Capsanthin may be added to poultry feed to enhance egg yolk colour.
Typical products include eggs, meat products.
Not listed in Australia.   Avoid it.

Vegetable oil - could be anything

So other than the veggie oil, possible corn, soy and paprika colour that could be spicy for some, they're pretty good.  They were the least fatty of any sausages I've ever cooked btw.  


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

Family - O+ DH and DD (both hunter-ish)
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Lola
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Sa Bon Nim
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make your own....at least you know what goes in them!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Finally got around to it and now I have SWAMI Xpress, am using the very useful list to write local equivalents next to food items.  Very handy, thanks to everyone who contributed to the list.

Some corrections I noticed though, for the Summary tables only from Food Choices.  Can someone please second these updates and then update, please kind Admin people.

Rutagaba     Sweedes     AU, NZ
It is the yellow parsnip

Should read it is the yellow TURNIP
Also SwEdes - only has one e
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutabaga

Just bought some today (diamond food) and the veggie shop had turnips (the white ones) and Swedes next to each other and the same price.

Also noticed      Sweet Potatos should have an e "sweet potatoes"



New Research to check and add:
Swiss Chard is known as Silverbeet or Mangold in Australia
http://www.gardenate.com/plant/Silverbeet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_chard

Scallion is known as Spring Onion in Australia but also known as a salad onion, onion sticks or green onion in many countries
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scallion

If I find anything else I'll put more research on here. Will get to the bean research I promised so long ago.  Where have you bean all my life?  


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

Family - O+ DH and DD (both hunter-ish)
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Quoted Text
Also noticed      Sweet Potatos should have an e "sweet potatoes"


either that or take away the s

thanks!
will email Bob and guide him to your post.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Quoted from Lola
seems all this farmed salmon species need is yoga for their blood glucose and viscosity levels!


Nice one Lola...fabulous work Mel. So are you only going to buy Huon?




Eating half and exercising double.
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G'day Jenny!

Admins -
Here's another one to add to the list:

Chayote, Pipinella, Vegetable pear is known as Choko in Australia and probably around the world?  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chayote

Had some last night and it's nice baked, though the skin went quite tough - you can skip that bit.


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

Family - O+ DH and DD (both hunter-ish)
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Research on Tahitian Spinach Xsnthosoma brasillience:
This is a variety of the Taro plant grown mainly for its edible leaves, rather than for  its  Taro roots.

The Tahitian Spinach is the ideal leaf to use of the Taro family species because they have the least amount of the irritating potassium oxalate crystals which can produce life threatening throat irritation.   Taro species leaves always need to be throughly cooked first before eating.  A rapid boiling of at least twenty minutes is advised and after cooking throw the water away.  Although this method of cooking may seem to remove nutrients from these vegetables, there is still great food value left in them to provide goodness per serve. (from Pemaculture training course).

http://www.gardening.eu/arc/plants/Apartment-Plants/Xanthosoma-brasiliense-Desf.-Engl/73352/.
In our lists it may appeared listed as 'Taro leaves, shoots' rather than common spinach.




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Malanga, Tannier, Xanthosoma
and
Taro leaves, shoots

wish I knew the difference


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Reply 449 in this thread helps a little bit.  I tried to post as many official explanations and photos as possible about the different ones I could think of then ...  Nothing beats seeing them all in person to grasp the differences.  I personally have not seen all the varieties, and I am a bit scared of trying them out (with the issue of the crystal toxicity!!  Well, I am glad I have plenty other options to indulge my taste buds with  




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Cristina
Monday, May 3, 2010, 12:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
Gender: Female
Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Research on Sardines:

This is a very good link explaining the different varieties and genera of the Sardines: Atlantic, Pacific and others:

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-xpress/m-1253837147/

Got to compare this with Typebase info.  You are welcome to jump on this research too!  




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DenverFoodie
Monday, May 3, 2010, 3:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami: GT1 Hunter (50%) Non-Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,477
Gender: Male
Location: Colorado
Research on Kiwi Fruit:

Is There Any Difference Except the Color?

Kiwi not only comes in the familiar bright green variety, but also a sunny golden color. They both look about the same outside, with a fuzzy brown skin. Cut open, you can see the difference, but is the color the only
thing that separates the two? No, the green and golden kiwi taste different, and have a slightly different texture. They were developed for agricultural production at different times.

Kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) is more properly called Kiwifruit to distinguish it from the New Zealand bird, but most American's simply call it Kiwi. It is also known as the Chinese Gooseberry. That name reflects its botanical origins, as its seeds were collected in 1904 by Isabel Fraser in the upper regions of the Yangtze River in southern China.1 Fraser was on vacation from teaching school in New Zealand, and returned home with the Kiwi seeds which propagated, and gave birth to an entire industry. Until very recently all commercially produced Kiwi came from vines grown from that original stock of seeds.

The familiar green variety, whose name is "Hayward," was developed in 1924 in New Zealand. In 1940 commercial growing and marketing of the fruit began. In the 1970's they began to be grown in California and are now commonly available in the United States. Currently, Italy is the largest producer of Kiwi in the world, followed by New Zealand, Chile, France, Greece, the United States, Portugal and Spain. 2

The golden "Chinabelle" is a more recent cultivar that took eleven years to develop. Some unusual kiwi fruits from China were discovered with small yellow fruits, and these were hybridized with the green variety. This was accomplished by the New Zealand Crown Research Institute.

Outside, you can tell the two varieties apart if you pay attention. Both are about the size of a large hen's egg with brown skin. The green kiwi is slightly fuzzier, and symmetrically oval. The golden kiwi has a smoother skin and a small nub or point on one end.


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C_Sharp
Monday, May 3, 2010, 5:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Purple Kiwis are also available in some places (with smooth or hairy skin).


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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Cristina
Monday, May 3, 2010, 8:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Quoted from Vicki
Dead mold or live mold - the same effect when eaten?

Here's some guidelines for mold on different types of foods:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/molds_on_food/


Thought this info will be handy to have in this thread, Good spot Vicki!!!




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Symbi
Friday, May 28, 2010, 3:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Location: Brisbane, Australia
Age: 40
Quoted from Jenny
Symbi's question..........Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums..........................................................................

I see them in a big store in Canberra called SupaBarn, but even though i know they are pimentos by the appearance, they are generically labelled capsicum. Years ago I used to see them in a health food store with the same mistaken identification, so just for fun you might consider doing a "food crawl" around all your local fresh food outlets. Once you have found the genuine article you will always know them by appearance. Few people outside our select group will see the need to label them correctly, so we just need to be independent of their mistaken labels.


You were right Jenny, to keep those peepers open and look around.   I found some pimentos in Woolworths!!!  They are sold in a pack of four under the name Capsicum Baby Red 250g (wee little things - used two in stir fry last night).  
They taste sweet like paprika unsurprisingly and didn't give me the burps which other capsicums do!   (neutral on my SWAMI)  




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