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Research on food choices for all  This thread currently has 45,973 views. Print Print Thread
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Cristina
Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
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Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Extract from the University of Florida webpage:

quote
Ciguatera Poisoning

The ciguatera chain starts when herbivorous animals consume the dinoflagellates and their toxins, concentrate and transform the toxins in their tissues, and pass them up the food chain, usually with further accumulation and concentration accompanying each step. More than 400 marine species in 60 different families have been found to accumulate ciguatoxins (Brusle 1997). Among the most important because of their seafood value are barracuda; some snapper (for example red, dog, blackfin, and cubera); amberjack, kingfish; some grouper (for example red, Nassau, snowy, yellowedge, and speckled hind); and hogfish; (Figure 2). Rarely, some primary consumers including herbivorous fish and invertebrates also cause ciguatera poisoning.
unquote

As you can see, even fish especies listed in Typebase could have  members carrying the ciguatera toxins, but that does not mean that we have to write them off.  Red Emperor in Australia is one of the most popular fishes on the table, yet, in some websites it is listed as possible carriers of the disease. Mahi Mahi is in my superfood list, but it has also been listed as carrying disease.  

Like with everything else, know your suppliers, talk to your fish mongrels.  Fish is the one food I will not be buying off the street stall, but from a regulated, safety and quality compliant supplier who undergoes regular inspections.  I will also follow advice given by relevant authorities in the subject, like selecting the younger fish (less time to accumulate toxins), eating small portions (sounds familiar?  All of a sudden the 'size of the palm of your hand' in Swami, takes a new significance).  Above all, staying compliant and true to our type will give us the best chance of emerging healthy and fit if and when hidden toxins like these sneak into our bodies.

This is the link: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IN742

By the way, ciguatera poisoning is not the only fish contracted diseace we have to be awared of.  There is something called Scombries or something like that (but that is another story).  So, which is the next fish on the list?  Back to research ...




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Cristina
Friday, October 9, 2009, 11:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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I finally find time to set Jenny's list in table form here.  This is Jenny's original list we started from. Fishes from the list have been (and are being) placed in this thread Summary tables, as we progress with our research to match Typebase fishes.

Thank you Jenny once again for all your ground work.


Australian fish (available at the Fyshwick market, Canberra)            
Common nameLatin namenearest Latin name in U.S.Common name in U.S.
Atlantic salmon (whole gutted or fillets)salmo salar
Barramundi (whole or fillets)lates calcarifer
Blueeye cod (cutlets) hyperoglyple Antarctica
Blue warehou (fillets)seriolella brama
Bonito (whole)sarda spp.
Calamari tubeseuthoidea/loliginidae
Coral trout (whole)plectropomus spp & variola spp4
Deep sea bream fillets
Flake (fillets)
Garfish (whole)hemiramphidae
Gemfish (fillets)rexea solandri,  paristiopterus gallipavo & labiosus
Gold band snapperlutjanidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
King George whiting (whole)sillinidae
Kingfish (fillets)
Leatherjacket (whole)monacanthidae
Ling (fillets)genypterus/ophidiidaeophidon eleongatusling cod/alaskan
Luderick (blackfish) (whole)girella tricuspidatesimilar to girella nigricansopaleye fish
Monkfish (fillets)
mullet (whole)mugil cephalissameflathead mullet /black mullet
Ocean trout (fillets)-farmedoncorhynchus mykiss&salmo trutta
Orange roughy (deep sea perch)hoplostethus atlanticussamesame
Rainbow trout (whole)oncorhynchus mykisssamerainbow trout/coastrange trout
Redspot whiting (whole)lethrinus lentjan
Red snapper (fillets) (breams?)sparidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
Sardineslupeinae spp
Salmon tails (fillets) farmed oncorhynchussamemany different names
Silver bream (whole)
Snapper (whole) (breams)sparidaelutjanus campechanusnth red snapper
Swordfish (steaks)xiphias gladiussamesame/broadbill
Threadfin bream (whole)nemipteridae & hemiramphus robustus
Whiting (fillets)sillaginidae & acanthistius
Yellowfin tuna sashimi (steaks) thunnus albacaressame




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Cristina
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SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Copying Non Equivalent summary from Reply 113 to continue the updates:
Non TypeBase Food Choices Summary No 2
Common Name   Scientific Name   Location   Testimonials  
Fish and seafood
Australian Salmon/Kahawai(Arripis truttaceus) Australia,NewZealandReply 8,9,12,13,15,16,17,181,207
Barramundi(Lates calcarifer) Australia,NewZealandbarra,giant Perch, aussie seabass,silver jack - Reply 108,114,117
Blue MackerelScomber australasicus Australia,NewZealandJapanece or Pacific or Spotted Mackerel, Spotted Chub - Reply 8, 213
Blue-eyed CodHyperoglyphe antarctica Australia,NewZealandAntarctic butterfish, deepsea trevally, blue eye trevalla, - Reply 32,130
BonitoSarda SppAustralia,NewZealand- Reply 215
Coral TroutPlectropomus sppAustralia,NewZealand- Reply 221
Warehou, blue Australia,NewZealand - Reply 214
HokiMacruronus novaezelandiae Australia,NewZealandBlue Grenadier, Blue Hake, Whiptail Hake - Reply 7
GemfishRexea solandriAustralia,NewZealand Also Hake,King Couta, Kingfish, Silver Kingfish and Southern Kingfish Reply 26, 128




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Cristina
Friday, October 9, 2009, 1:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Research:
Australian Salmon (Arripis truttaceus)

PS: Notice that the scientific name Salmo Salar is reserved for the Atlantic Salmon.

A comment from a NZ perspective:
quote
kahawai Superficially rather salmon-like, greenish to dark blue above
and silvery or white below. Small kahawai, less than about 30 cm, have a
number of brown spots and are sometimes called kopapa. The flesh of
kahawai is dark, rather reddish in colour (especially the band along the
outer middle of the fillet), medium to coarse in texture, with a
comparatively strong flavour. In Australia, where this fish is known as
salmon or Australian salmon, this fish is regarded highly when canned,
but in NZ it is under-rated, indeed often regarded with contempt, when
in fact is suitable for all cooking methods. Needs to be chilled quickly
when caught or deteriorates quickly. Often can be bought very cheaply;
highly recommended. Try it and thereafter you will be able to smile
patronisingly at the fools who, having never tried it themselves, tell you
it is “dry” and “flavourless”.
unquote

This NZ link makes good reading to get to know not only some local fishes terminology, but also comments about texture, taste and how to handle some of the fish.
http://www.cooknwithgas.co.nz/heritage/know.html

Also, this other link will be very useful for NAP food experts to judge the placing of the Aussie Salmon in our diets.  Check nutritional info.

http://www.australianseafood.com.au/species.php?f=3&v=f

Also, hints on how to pick the Aussie salmon when buying it:

http://www.nicechoice.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=29&Itemid=43


In conclusion:
Australian Salmon goes to the equivalent table with the common names of Australian Salmon and NZ Kahawai.
Australian Salmon can be found wild in many parts around the coast of Australia and NZ (Kangaroo Island, Rocky Point) check the web links. Commercial suppliers may be mostly farmed though, as Jumari found out in earlier posts.
Australian Salmon flesh varies from pale pink to brown (get lighter when cooked) and the younger the fish the better the taste.
Websites give an indication that it is usually reasonably price (cheaper alternative to the Atlantic, Chinook varieties?).





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Sed
Friday, October 9, 2009, 1:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Type, RH-
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I am based in the UK, just wanted to share my findings on Escarole (in reference to reply 187 in thread).

I only found Escarole so far in the big supermarkets under the name  Batavian lettuce. I found this information on Waitrose website:

"Endive is a member of the lettuce family and is quite similar to chicory. There are two main types, batavian or escarole endive has a bitter lettuce flavour and has crisp, broad green leaves. Curly endive can be plain green or with a hint of red, it also has a bitter flavour and can grow to over 25cm in diameter"

So it seems that in the UK Escarole can be called Batavian, escarole or endive (possibly with the word lettuce added sometimes). The one I found was in Tesco and as I mentioned above was called Batavian lettuce. Just to make things even more confusing I did see lettuce that looked like Curly endive but it was called summer lettuce... I haven't seen any of these at farmers markets or in small vegetable shops yet, but I am keeping my eyes peeled.

We also have Chicory, but it it looks very different from the lettuce like Endive family. It is small and oval shaped with tightly packed yellow/white or red/white leafs.

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Cristina
Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Good spotting Sed:
It is a bit comforting to know that the confusion is not just limited to aussie land.  It looks like escarole, endive and chikory are terms used to identify plants of the same chicory family.

According to the following link, the chicory you described (yellow white red), are the belgian endives and red belgian endives.

The escarole is the broad leaf endive and it is also referred as  chicory (or chicory leaf according to whoever designed the UK version of SwamiXpress).
Here is the only link I could find where it indicates that escarole may also be called chicory:

http://www.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t--33009/batavian-endive.asp

This other link has nice clear photos from someone who grows both, endive and escarole:
http://foodiefarmgirl.blogspot.com/2005/12/weekend-herb-blogging-9-endive_04.html

I think they are all part of the same family. I tend to agree with you, at least for the australian version of escarole, it is the broad leaf endive, rather than the chicory version.  The Australian Vegetarian Society tries to clarify the confusion in this link (refer to the 10th or 11th paragraph down the page):

http://www.veg-soc.org/cms/html/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=16

To our research team, this requires further study and we may have to change the equivalent table to something other than chicory leaf.  The UK version does use that term for escarole (I double checked).





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Sed
Friday, October 9, 2009, 3:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Type, RH-
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Posts: 230
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Location: UK
Christina, the links you provided were all very informative, but the vegetarian society's explanation has clarified it best for me:

" Chicory and endive are closely related greens, whose names cause much confusion. Endive is an annual and includes curly leaf varieties as well as broad-leaved ones, sometimes known as escarole. Chicory is a perennial and includes a number of cultivars, including the confusingly named Belgian endive. Radicchio also belongs to the chicory family. Both chicory and endive are bitter leaved and can liven up a salad bowl. They can also be cooked like spinach."

Yes, the confusion seem to stem from the fact that they are closely related plant families therefore often categorised as one. And within each family (e.i. chicory and endive there are different varieties with interchangable names. Like in your other link:

"A crisp, broadleaf type of endive most often served as a salad green that is also known as escarole, broad chicory, or common chicory. This member of the chicory family has broad outer leaves with a crinkled shape. The leaves provide a slightly bitter taste, yet not as bitter as Belgian or curly endive. As the outer leaves are removed, the inner leaves display a paler green coloring with more white and a taste less bitter than the outer leaves. Escarole is popular as a salad green, eaten raw with mayonnaise or a vinaigrette dressing. When cooked, the greens are often served as a vegetable steamed or braised, and can be added to soups for flavoring in the later stages of soup making."

Thanks for the info.
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Possum
Friday, October 9, 2009, 9:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Cristina
A comment from a NZ perspective: "kahawai Superficially rather salmon-like, greenish to dark blue above and silvery or white below. Small kahawai, less than about 30 cm, have a number of brown spots and are sometimes called kopapa. The flesh of kahawai is dark, rather reddish in colour (especially the band along the outer middle of the fillet), medium to coarse in texture, with a comparatively strong flavour. In Australia, where this fish is known as salmon or Australian salmon, this fish is regarded highly when canned,but in NZ it is under-rated, indeed often regarded with contempt, when in fact is suitable for all cooking methods. Needs to be chilled quickly when caught or deteriorates quickly. Often can be bought very cheaply; highly recommended. Try it and thereafter you will be able to smilepatronisingly at the fools who, having never tried it themselves, tell you it is “dry” and “flavourless” This NZ link makes good reading to get to know not only some local fishes terminology, but also comments about texture, taste and how to handle some of the fish. http://www.cooknwithgas.co.nz/heritage/know.html
Australian Salmon goes to the equivalent table with the common names of Australian Salmon and NZ Kahawai.
Australian Salmon can be found wild in many parts around the coast of Australia and NZ (Kangaroo Island, Rocky Point) check the web links. Commercial suppliers may be mostly farmed though, as Jumari found out in earlier posts.
Australian Salmon flesh varies from pale pink to brown (get lighter when cooked) and the younger the fish the better the taste. Websites give an indication that it is usually reasonably price (cheaper alternative to the Atlantic, Chinook varieties?).

Thanks heaps for this Cristina - and for all the hard work by all of you - sorry been a bit sick this week on my days off...as well as working on other days... Will have to check out "kahawai"... sounds very interesting, altho' I've certainly never seen it marketed here...not surprisingly, of course;)
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Cristina
Saturday, October 10, 2009, 2:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Well, before we forget, I have updated Summary Table No4 (equivalent) for Escarole:  it is now Broad Leaf Chicory Endive. Concensus?






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Cristina
Saturday, October 10, 2009, 6:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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I realized that since GW Reply 8, we have not posted much info about the sourthern Blue Mackerel, so for the record, here is some.

Check this out for a lesson on how to dissect a fish (using the Blue Mackerel as a specimen):

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Dissection-of-a-Blue-Mackerel-Scomber-australasicus

Useful info from Nice Choice and Sydney fish market.
http://www.nicechoice.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=28&Itemid=42

http://www.sydneyfishmarket.com.au/Information/SpeciesInfo/tabid/91/xmmid/620/xmid/1656/Default.aspx

The good thing about the Blue Mackerel is that, unlike its spanish cousin, it does not seem to have been involved in any cases of ciguatera or scroimbos.




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Cristina
Saturday, October 10, 2009, 12:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My Swami lists a lot of melons and all graded from SFs, neutrals, BDs and Avoids.  Persian, Spanish, Crenshaw, Honeydew, Musk, Canteloupe, Casaba, Canary, Christmas, Bitter, Honeydew ... Have I forgotten any?




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C_Sharp
Saturday, October 10, 2009, 5:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Cristina
My Swami lists a lot of melons and all graded from SFs, neutrals, BDs and Avoids.  Persian, Spanish, Crenshaw, Honeydew, Musk, Cantaloupe, Casaba, Canary, Christmas, Bitter, Honeydew ... Have I forgotten any?


The melon that strikes me as missing is Watermelon.

The melon included that I would not include in a list of melons is "Bitter", since to me it is a vegetable (more like a squash, and not sweet like most of the other melons listed). I think it should only be listed under live foods and not listed both under fruit and live foods in SWAMI.




MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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Cristina
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Quoted from Possum

Thanks heaps for this Cristina - and for all the hard work by all of you - sorry been a bit sick this week on my days off...as well as working on other days... Will have to check out "kahawai"... sounds very interesting, altho' I've certainly never seen it marketed here...not surprisingly, of course;)


Oh Possum, I hope you are back to your usual self soon.  We miss you.  Also, Au and NZ are very much linked regarding food choices and it help us understand these choices better getting as much info as possible from both places.  Let us know how you go with your 'kahawai' research.  To be honest, I have never seen marketed here many of the food choices we are discussing, but in my case, it has been because I have not looked (if you know what I mean).  Now, it is like a whole new world of possibilities has opened up and every trip to the markets/shops is a gastronomy lesson to enjoy.  




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Jenny
Sunday, October 11, 2009, 1:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swamied Warrior
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Getting back to PAWPAW---I just found the thread elsewhere which includes a magnificent photograph of a...well....custard apple like thing, which is so unlike the Australian pawpaw/papaya that I think the jury is definitely back on this one. whoopee.
Seriously awaiting custard apple season.



Eating half and exercising double.
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Cristina
Sunday, October 11, 2009, 1:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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From our non equivalent summary:

Blue Warehou info:

http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter.nsf/WebPages/RPIO-4Y98ZQ?open

with nutrition facts and cooking ideas:

http://www.australianseafood.com.au/species.php?f=158&v=f





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Cristina
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Age: 63




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Possum
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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Cristina


Oh Possum, I hope you are back to your usual self soon.  We miss you.  Also, Au and NZ are very much linked regarding food choices and it help us understand these choices better getting as much info as possible from both places.  Let us know how you go with your 'kahawai' research.  
Cheers Cristina!! All good now...
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Cristina
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SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Age: 63
Brought over from Reply 181 to keep updating:

TypeBase Fish and SeaFood Choices Summary No 4
             
Typebase AU/NZ Equivalent Comments
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) Paua ((Haliotidae Iris) NZ only - Reply 99
Abalone (Haliotus Tuberculata ) (Haliotidae)Abalone,Blacklip(rubra),brownlip  (conicopora) or Greenlip (laevigata)      (ex

Muttonfish ) - Reply 99
Anchovies (Engralis Mordax ) canned AnchoviesChoose the canned european variety only (Engraulis encrasicolus)
Atlantic Cod(Gadus morhua) Atlantic CodSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Atlantic Salmon(Samo Salar) Atlantic Salmon
Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda )Barracuda (Sphyraena Barracuda ) Choose Only young  barracuda, See  Reply
Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) TaylorSeafood Services Australia See  Reply 153
Bullhead(Ictalurus Nebulosus) NZ Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) NIWA Atlas of NZ Reply 157
ButterfishButterfishBanded Scat, Barred Scat, Butterfish, John Dory, Johnny Dory, Old Maid, Southern Butter-fish, Striped

Butterfish. See warning on Reply 68 about toxic substitutes
Carp(Cyprinus carpio) European CarpSeafood Services Australia Reply 153
Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha )Chinook Salmon
Herrings/Atlantic (Clupea Harengus Harengus) HerringsCaabTaxon code 37 085790 - Reply 156
Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus) Mackerel,Atlantic (Scomber scombrus)
Mackerel,Spanish (Scomber commerson) Spaniards/Spanish Mackerel, (Scomberomorus commerson)
Mahi Mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) Mahi mahi/ dolphinfish
Monkfish (Lophius Americanus ) Speckled Stargazer (Kathetostoma canaster
Pollock (Pollachius Virens) ColeyCaabTaxon code 37 226796 Reply 162
ScrodYoung Cod FilletsTaken from UK version of Swami
ShadRiver HerringsTaken from UK version of Swami
Shrimp     Prawn
Silver PerchSilver PerchReply 133
Swordfish (xiphias gladius) Swordfish
Trout, Rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Rainbow TroutReply 218
Trout, Brown (Salmo trutta) Brown TroutReply 218
Trout, Brook (Salvelinus fontinalis)Brook TroutReply 218
Trout, Sea (Salmo trutta)Sea TroutReply 220
Trout, Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Sea Rainbow TroutReply 220
Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares) Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares)




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Cristina
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SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
Gender: Female
Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Trout Research:

It looks like some freshwater trout in Australia are the same especies as the ones in US, at least according to Typebase description of Trouts.

Typebase freshwater     
rainbow trout,--Oncorhynchus mykiss)
steelhead or salmon trout--Oncorhynchus mykiss)
brown trout--Salmo trutta
Brook or speckled trout--Salvelinus fontinalis

US descriptions:
http://www.ncfishandgame.com/trout_fishing/trout-varieties.php

Equivalent AU links (common names only):
http://www.trout-fishing.com.au/

And now with the Scientific names:
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/brook-trout
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/brown-trout
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fisheries/recreational/freshwater/fw-species/rainbow-trout

Conclusion:
Rainbow, Brown and Brook Trout go into Seafood Summary 4 pot ready for cooking.




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Cristina
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SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Age: 63
On the subject of fish and possible ciguatera poisoning I would like to record here Dr D's recommendation:

Quoted from Dr. D
RE: ciguatera food poisoning

Just an FYI for the chart. Responds incredibly well to 2000mg /daily pantothentic acid (B5) supplementation.



I posted this here just as information since some of the fish we eat in our zone may be from ciguatera infected areas.  C_Sharp has created a specific thread on the subject and you may post further comments about it on his thread:




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Cristina
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SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Age: 63
Research on Sea Trout:

The veil uncovers.  Sea Trout is the sea version of the Brown Trout.  This link identifies the species in Australia:

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Brown-Trout-Salmo-trutta-Linnaeus-1758

Therefore Sea Trout goes to the equivalent table.  (It is a diamond in my Swami)

Another trout from Typebase and in our Swamis is the Steelhead trout, which is the sea version of the Rainbow trout, therefore it has earnt its place in the Au/Nz seafood summary 4 cooking pot.  




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Cristina
Sunday, October 11, 2009, 12:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
Gender: Female
Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Research Coral Trout:

Not in Typebase or US (not that I could find)

This uniqueness may send the youngest and smallest of the species to the exclusive aussie cooking pot: 'not in Typebase Food choices Summary 2' at location 206.  

When and if we decide to throw this fish in the cooking pot, we will have to make sure that we 'pop' in a B5 in ourselves as per Dr D's instructions in Reply 219, because of the very last paragraph in this link:

http://www.reef.crc.org.au/research/fishing_fisheries/CoralTrout.htm

Stay safe.  




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Symbi
Monday, October 12, 2009, 3:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
Posts: 1,252
Gender: Female
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Age: 40
Hi, thanks for all the work everyone.  I've been busy with a surprise visitor for the weekend, and making spelt bread.  Yum!

Found some brochures here that I realised may be handy from the Brisbane Markets, Fruit and Vegetable guide to seasonal availability.  It has pictures of common fruits and veg on the back, scanned some of those as they may be helpful.

Also found out that they have a fabulous website and link to one in Melbourne too.  http://www.brisbanemarkets.com.au/cms/bpmgp-fruit-and-vege-info.html  It links to seasonal availability - search by month or fruit or veg item.  Great information on many fruits and veg.

On the papaw / papaya / custard apple question.  Is this right - papaya is in type base (our paw paw).  Papaya and Paw paw are in the Genotype Diet.  Custard apple is in neither - so that might have to go to the untested fruit section.  

The custard apple is of the same family but is very different to the american Paw Paw (our C_Sharp posted here http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1253310480/s-16/highlight-C_Sharp/#num16  





Also from the Bris Markets Fruit and Veg info for paw paw, see: http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=88  "Common names for the fruit include papaya and tree melon, depending on the country in which it is grown. "

Also on custard apples http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=43

The page for Papaya is blank unfortunately!


INFJ ex-Ghee Whiz, GTD Explorer Sept_09 - SWAMI Mar_10

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Lola
Monday, October 12, 2009, 3:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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paw paw is the custard apple.......guanabana down here

as opposed to papaw, same word for papaya


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Cristina
Monday, October 12, 2009, 6:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,548
Gender: Female
Location: Sunny Coast,��QLD, Australia
Age: 63
Quoted from Lola
paw paw is the custard apple.......guanabana down here

as opposed to papaw, same word for papaya


Yes, we gather that much.  There are different varieties in Australia (for custard apple).  Unfortunately we will have to wait till March or thereabouts to see them in the markets. Jenny our guinea pig, is eagerly waiting for the occasion.  

So Lola, you have been using guanabana in place of american pawpaw?  If that is the case, then I have great news for all of us in aussie land:

Check this link up:

http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/cps/rde/dpi/hs.xsl/16_11747_ENA_HTML.htm

Jenny, and any other Sydneygoers, keep an eye for Guanabana and if we cannot get it out here, we may have to arrange for a consigment to be sent to Qld.  But, it is great that now we may have an official fresh american PawPaw equivalent, courtesy of our infalable Lola!!  

PS:
http://hubpages.com/hub/Medicinal-Benefits-of-Soursop
on the other hand we may go for the cherimoya:
http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/fruit%20pages/cherimoya.htm




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