Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Supp Right For Your Type  ›  Type O with possible dyslexia
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 11 Guests

Type O with possible dyslexia  This thread currently has 1,127 views. Print Print Thread
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Adopted4
Monday, March 4, 2013, 8:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45

My youngest daughter, blood type O, has multiple special needs.  I'm strongly suspecting she has dyslexia after talking to another mom with 2 dyslexic children, and then searching some websites about dyslexia. We will, in the not too distant future, try to get a professional diagnosis when she has to have a medical exam this fall for the 2-year post-placement adoption visit from a social worker, but until then I'm going to try to educate myself on the warning signs and symptoms.

I've read the archives on this website about dyslexia, but it didn't answer all my questions.

Here are my questions and concerns:
(1). DHA has been encouraged, but they all seem to contain cod liver oil which isn't good for O nonnies and we don't know her secretor status. Is there a fish oil good for a type O child with unknown secretor status? BTW, she eats compliant fish about twice a week.

(2). Are there other good "brain foods" or supplements that could help stimulate her brain (other than following the O blood type diet)?

(3). Are there any others willing to share their knowledge, insight, or personal testimony of living with and managing dyslexia?


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message
SquarePeg
Monday, March 4, 2013, 8:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,406
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
Just guessing that B12 might help.

Large doses of P5P (the active co-enzyme of B6) really helped our autistic daughter.  Perhaps it might help with dyslexia.

I wonder if Brain Gym type exercises might help?


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 21
ruthiegirl
Monday, March 4, 2013, 11:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,075
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 41
Most commercial "fish oil" supplements come from sardines and anchovies. Sardines are beneficial but anchovies are an "avoid." The anchovy oil is not rated separately from the whole anchovy- so it might be OK. I've also seen salmon oil supplements. Salmon is neutral for all Os, but higher amounts of the oil are needed to get the same omega 3s as in the "fish oil" supplements.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 21
Adopted4
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 2:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
Thanks SquarePeg and Ruth. I had never heard of P5P, but it sounds like a supplement that increases neurotransmitter activity, which would most certainly be at least somewhat beneficial. I had also not heard of Brain Gym activities, but that looks like it could be very helpful in the future. Right now I have to do some of my own assessments on my daughter based on the information I"m collecting on dyslexia. It would be a bit tricky to get an accurate professional diagnosis because my daughters language acquisition is still in the early stages, not to mention she received literally no schooling in China through the age of 6.

Ruth, I'm going to search a couple of my favorite websites of good compliant fish oil supplements for my daughter. I'm sure I"ll find something that I"m comfortable with, as well as vitamin B12 SquarePeg.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 21
Lola
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 2:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,009
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
how about trehalose?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 4 - 21
Lola
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 2:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,009
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 5 - 21
Adopted4
Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 9:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
Thanks, Lola. There was very good information in the links, particularly the first one dealing specifically with dyslexia. I'm a little uncertain about using a salmon fish oil supplement with a DHA supplement, which is a non-fish supplement. They both contain DHA and I want to make sure I don't overdo it and give my daughter too much since she also consumes some fish and eggs in her diet. I've tentatively chosen some supplements for order but the dosage varies considerably, so I"m not sure if I should start her on a low dosage to see how she'll respond.

Dr. D posted on that particular thread about Neuromins DHA but didn't mention how much to give or whether or not it could be combined with a fish oil supplement. I tend to think it wouldn't be harmful to combine fish oil with Neuromins (I'm also considering Thyme oil), but I"m still reluctant to "dose" her up with a bunch of new supplements.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 21
Lola
Thursday, March 7, 2013, 6:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,009
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
have you checked for allergies?

try the cognitive improvement protocol
work on her stress levels

pycnogenol and vit B6


Did you ever smoke?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 7 - 21
Adopted4
Thursday, March 7, 2013, 7:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
My daughter has no obvious allergies. In fact, she is surprisingly non-reactive compared to my type O husband and daughter. She is very easy going and isn't generally very stressed easily, with the exception of medical care.

P5P, the pre-cursor of B6 has been recommended already and I"m planning on using the supplement on dd.

I"ve never been a smoker and we have a completely smoke-free environment. Although, I have no idea what smoke she may have been exposed to in her orphanage or pre-natally from her birthmother. A lot of the knowledge I"m gleaning from different websites says it's important to identify what may have triggered a child's dyslexia, so obviously that is unknown and we have to deal with the "here and now".


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 8 - 21
SquarePeg
Thursday, March 7, 2013, 7:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,406
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
You can approach your school district with concerns and ask for an evaluation, even if she's too young to start school.  A DX won't have a medical basis, but the school might provide an IEP and occupational therapy, which might include some Brain Gym exercises.  Schools act surprisingly fast in these matters.  Early intervention is so important with any kind of developmental delay.


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 21
jeanb
Thursday, March 7, 2013, 10:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 973
Gender: Female
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Dad was dyslexic, brother is dyslexic.  School was not great but tech school was the best, more hands on and less writing.  Both were very successful in their careers and social lives, no issues, both were excellent athletes and creative in building and fixing things.

Revision History (1 edits)
jeanb  -  Friday, March 8, 2013, 6:35am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 21
Adopted4
Friday, March 8, 2013, 2:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
SquarePeg,

We will soon be having a supervisor from the county come into our home to evaluate our home school to satisfy Maryland's home schooling requirements. Also, we will be meeting with the Cranial-Facial team of specialists at John's Hopkins in D.C. within a few months from now to further evaluate and treat our daughter's multiple special needs. We just moved from Minnesota last fall (maybe you knew that) where we were taking our daughter to a different team of specialists and it was presumed that she had other disabilities that were yet to be realized. Now that she is slowly becoming more verbal and is progressing through her kindergarten curriculum, it's apparent that some academic areas she struggles with more than others. There's no doubt that much will be done in the upcoming months and the next school year to properly address her learning disabilities.

Jean, thanks for the info about your dad and brother. Traditional schooling isn't always good for these special kind of children because they don't learn everything the way most kids do, and need more flexibility and outlets to meet their special learning needs. Playing legos may not sound like school, but I know it has done a lot for my daughter's attention span, creativity, and self-esteem. So many things she missed out on for 6 years of her life in an orphanage that did nothing to encourage and stimulate learning. I know she's aware of her speech and learning challenges when we take her to sunday school and children's church as compared to other children, but we are fortunate that she can be home schooled and she doesn't have to go through the stress of struggling to keep up with other school age kids.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 21
ruthiegirl
Friday, March 8, 2013, 8:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,075
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 41
How old is she?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 21
Adopted4
Saturday, March 9, 2013, 12:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
My daughter is 7 years old, going on 8 in June. Typical kids her age are in 2nd grade and she is working at a kindergarten level. Although she's 2 years behind academically, the goal is to get her caught up within 3-4 years which is a reasonable expectation for an older adopted child. However, full language comprehension can take as much as 5 years for school-aged adopted children. She was 6 1/2 when she was adopted. We don't believe in taking "summer vacation" with our young adopted children as there is so much learning and catching up to do, so she is at an advantage in that regard being home schooled.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 21
Patty H
Saturday, March 9, 2013, 1:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,128
Gender: Female
Location: Massachusetts
Age: 56
Adopted4 - both my kids are dyslexic and I would say that supplements, while supportive, are not the answer.  The right reading program is!  Sorry to burst your (and others' bubble) but I have a lot of experience in this area.

Children who are dyslexic need a phonetically-based reading program.  From what I know, most phonics programs in public schools have been thrown out the window.  We were fortunate enough to live a few miles from one of the best private schools in the country for remediating dyslexia, The Carroll School.  Look it up.  I know you are not local to it, as it is in Lincoln, MA, but they use a reading program called Orton Gillingham.  Our daughter jumped six grades levels in reading in three years while at the Carroll School - more importantly, they work on self esteem.  Children with dyslexia and other learning differences can suffer terrible self-esteem issues.

Please feel free to PM me.  Just to be honest, our daughter is now 25 and went to the Carroll School for 3rd, 4th and 5th grades, so it was a long time ago, but I know that many of the issues remain the same.

At the time, I don't think Dr. D had even written his books, but I did try other supplements and remedies.  This is not to say these things cannot be supportive, but it is my humble opinion that an alternative reading program will do more to help your daughter while you support her with the right diet and supplements.  I also found I had to be careful about diet and supplements because our daughter, in particular, would view this intervention as more proof of her belief that she was stupid, so she had to eat a special diet.  It can be a double-edged sword.  Dyslexics brains are just wired differently.  My husband is dyslexic as well and I believe his father is too.  It generally runs in families.  When dyslexic children grow into adults and their self-esteem is in place, they can find that their learning difference is actually an asset in many circumstances, particularly in the areas of art/design.  Dyslexics think in three dimensions, rather than the typical linear thinking.  Eventually your daughter can learn to celebrate her unique difference!


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 14 - 21
SquarePeg
Saturday, March 9, 2013, 6:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,406
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
Hi Patty, it's wonderful that you provided your daughter with a successful intervention!  I think our DD would benefit from help with her problem with inferencing.  I wonder if there even is such a methodology.


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 15 - 21
Adopted4
Saturday, March 9, 2013, 8:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 375
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 45
Patty, I checked out the Carroll school's website and it looks very fascinating. Their philosophy is very similar to the "Charlotte Mason" approach to home schooling, a way to educate young children in an untraditional, multi-sensory, child-oriented fashion. I used this approach to educate my sons in their early elementary years due to their institutional delays and ADHD tendencies. Although they do not have dyslexia, I learned a lot from the EEAC (Eastern European Adoption Coalition)'s home school group about schooling special children in very unique ways. I'm seriously thinking about getting connected with another Yahoo group that focuses on home schooling special needs adopted children, as I let my membership lapse with the EEAC quite a number of years ago. In the meantime, the typical places I shop for home school curriculum have identified a number of books and curriculum to help meet the special needs of dyslexic children.

Patty, don't feel like you burst my bubble in suggesting that supplementing has lesser effects on dyslexic children and the right educational approach is the key to success. While I certainly don't disagree with you regarding the importance of the right schooling approach, everything I've read about supplementation with DHA, compliant fish oil, and certain B vitamins points to strong empirical evidence of their effectiveness in treating dyslexia. The archives on this website showed a discussion around year 2000 about dyslexia and supplementation, where Dr. D chimed in and recommended Neuromin, a DHA supplement I plan to give my daughter.

SquarePeg, when you mentioned your dd problem with inferencing, were you saying that she has a hard time understanding implied or suggested statements? One website I visited had testimonials of dyslexic children and one particular story was about a girl that couldn't understand general instructions given to a classroom of children, but needed to have instructions explicitly given directly to her to be understood. Sometimes they can't "read between the lines" and they process information  more literally than others.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 16 - 21
SquarePeg
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 12:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,406
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
Quoted from Adopted4
-snip-

SquarePeg, when you mentioned your dd problem with inferencing, were you saying that she has a hard time understanding implied or suggested statements? One website I visited had testimonials of dyslexic children and one particular story was about a girl that couldn't understand general instructions given to a classroom of children, but needed to have instructions explicitly given directly to her to be understood. Sometimes they can't "read between the lines" and they process information  more literally than others.

Yes that's it exactly.  She's accused of being lazy -- "You can do this if you'd just put in the effort," is some teachers' mantra.  It's because she's so smart in acquiring fact-based knowledge that they think she's merely refusing to do the implied reasoning.


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 17 - 21
Patty H
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 12:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,128
Gender: Female
Location: Massachusetts
Age: 56

Adopted4, I guess one of the things I would say is that you should be careful what you wish for.  Some dyslexics are the most successful people in the world and instead of trying change your DD, consider the idea that you can get her through schooling and help her to embrace and enhance her special gift.

Leonardo DaVinci, Pablo Picasso, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, Tom Cruise, Ansel Adams and Whoopi Goldberg are just a few examples of famous dyslexics.  Some people consider it a gift.  Our 25-year old daughter is finally beginning to see and capitalize on her gift.  She needed to get through school and that was difficult.  Now that she is out of college, she is learning to capitalize on the gift of dyslexia.

Below is a link to famous dyslexics:

http://www.dyslexia.com/famous.htm

I think we are born with our unique assets and challenges and I have learned, through my own children, that what was once considered a challenge is now viewed as an asset.  The real issue is our educational system.  It pigeon holes children and does not allow for much in the way of learning issues that are outside the norm.

One of the benefits of finding a school that can help remediate your DD's dyslexia is that she will learn she is not the only one who has dyslexia.  I think the power of building self-esteem for our daughter came from the idea that there were so many other children who had the same gifts and learning styles  In fact, The Carroll School offers several different "arts" type classes to help children with dyslexia find their "islands of competence."  We had a speaker come to The Carroll School and it was he who coined the term, "islands of competence."  Our daughter found her "island" in the performing arts and that is what she pursued in college and is now pursuing it beyond college.

Just my opinion - I hope you don't take offense - none is intended.  I do understand your struggle!!!






Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 18 - 21
Patty H
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 12:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,128
Gender: Female
Location: Massachusetts
Age: 56
Quoted from SquarePeg

Yes that's it exactly.  She's accused of being lazy -- "You can do this if you'd just put in the effort," is some teachers' mantra.  It's because she's so smart in acquiring fact-based knowledge that they think she's merely refusing to do the implied reasoning.


When I hear a teacher say, "Your child is lazy" I know that it is the teacher who is unwilling to think outside the box.  Children aim to please - period!!!  If someone is paying attention and praise their work, they are even more motivated to achieve, not so much for themselves but to please the adults around them.  Children are not inherently lazy.  Just my opinion.  It takes a lot of advocacy and effort to help the school system appreciate the unique gifts and challenges of each child.  Keep up the good work, Square Peg!  I know, first hand, the struggles that you and Adopted4 face.


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 19 - 21
Patty H
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 12:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,128
Gender: Female
Location: Massachusetts
Age: 56
Quoted from SquarePeg
Hi Patty, it's wonderful that you provided your daughter with a successful intervention!  I think our DD would benefit from help with her problem with inferencing.  I wonder if there even is such a methodology.


I see you are in the Northeast.  Are you close to The Carroll School in Lincoln, MA?  You don't need to answer this online, but I am just putting the question out for you.  There are many other wonderful schools in the Northeast.  Landmark is another school.  If you go to one to look into their program and they do not think your child would fit their program, I believe they could recommend a more appropriate program based on your child's most recent testing.

PM me if you want more info.


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 20 - 21
ruthiegirl
Sunday, March 10, 2013, 10:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,075
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 41
Quoted from SquarePeg

Yes that's it exactly.  She's accused of being lazy -- "You can do this if you'd just put in the effort," is some teachers' mantra.  It's because she's so smart in acquiring fact-based knowledge that they think she's merely refusing to do the implied reasoning.


Hannah's third grade teacher actually said to me "She doesn't have A.D.D. She has L.A.Z.Y." I wish I'd had the guts to pull her out of that classroom immediately and begin homeschooling her that year, instead of 2 years later. Hannah didn't learn much that year, but Mr D learned a lot from her about how to be a more effective teacher.

Some teachers are just much too full of themselves and too unwilling to work with students on their level.

BTW, Hannah's doing fine now with dietary changes- back then I cut out artificial additives, and a couple of years ago we discovered that wheat was the final piece of the puzzle in terms of her attention, mood, and focus. Even when she's not 100% compliant on the O diet, it's only wheat that she REALLY reacts to. Plus, of course, the fact that she's 16 rather than 8 has helped a lot too.  


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 21 - 21
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Supp Right For Your Type  ›  Type O with possible dyslexia

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread