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Vitamin D Updates II  This thread currently has 6,881 views. Print Print Thread
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Chloe
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from 815


She just said a few posts back when I told her to do that, that she has religious modesty and it's not practical for her to sit in the sun.


Well how about some sunlight on the arms below elbows, legs below the knees, face.....shouldn't that be adequate?  Even religious people get out in the sun....



"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Mayflowers
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Chloe

Well how about some sunlight on the arms below elbows, legs below the knees, face.....shouldn't that be adequate?  Even religious people get out in the sun....


Experts say you should have shorts (and I don't mean shorts that come down to your shins either.. regular short shorts) and a tank top on to get the most area exposed to the sun.. for 30 mins a day.  I doubt ruthie will do that.

But that is the problem.. taking a supplement instead of sitting out in the sun. I feel more balanced going to the tanning bed now and I plan to get 30 mins of sun along with the supplements. The body needs the sun.  It sets our sleep clock and thalamus.  They even said people shouldn't wear sun glasses because it interferes with the sunlight entering the eye..
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just spent 20 minutes reading outside on my front lawn, before it was time to pick up my son at school (he can't easily ride the school bus with the stitches on his knee.) I had my face, neck, and forearms exposed- the way I was sitting on the grass there was no way to get sunshine on my lower legs without flashing the neighbors.

I'm not sure just how much vitamin D I can get on Long Island this time of year from 3:10 until 3:30 PM. But it's certainly more than I would have gotten on my living room couch.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Just thinking- is there some kind of fabric that lets the UV light through but still blocks visible light? I could make myself a "sunbathing dress" that covers what needs to be covered yet lets my skin get the vitamin D-making sunshine.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Chloe
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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ruthie, what would you wear to the beach?

And why is it  you can only sit outside from 3:10 to 3:30?

But..... good job for making the effort to get some sunlight today.  


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 8:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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To the beach, I wear a 3/4 sleeved shirt, knee length full skirt, and leggings that come just past my knee, all sewn from bathing suit fabric.

I was only able to sit outside from 3:10 until 3:30 today because I didn't think of it until about 3:00 and then I had some housework to finish up before I could get outside, and then it was time to get Jack from school. I could theoretically be outside much longer, and closer to noon, on other days.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Chloe
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 8:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
Just thinking- is there some kind of fabric that lets the UV light through but still blocks visible light? I could make myself a "sunbathing dress" that covers what needs to be covered yet lets my skin get the vitamin D-making sunshine.


I know there are clothes that exist that block UV rays....My 3 year old great niece wears clothes like this when she's outdoors to protect her very fair skin.

You might have to check online to see if you can find fabric or go into a fabric store and ask.  I don't make my own clothes so not aware what's available.



"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Chloe
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 8:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
To the beach, I wear a 3/4 sleeved shirt, knee length full skirt, and leggings that come just past my knee, all sewn from bathing suit fabric.

I was only able to sit outside from 3:10 until 3:30 today because I didn't think of it until about 3:00 and then I had some housework to finish up before I could get outside, and then it was time to get Jack from school. I could theoretically be outside much longer, and closer to noon, on other days.


So a knee length skirt and 3/4 sleeved shirt will expose half of your arms, your hands and 1/2 your legs.  Your neck and face would be exposed and could you expose your feet?  

Whatever parts of your body you can expose to the sun would be better than nothing.

I know this modesty tradition belongs to women.

What about your son?  Can he wear a conventional bathing suit?

Weren't there a lot of sick days in your house this past winter?  MIght be directly related to low
sunlight exposure. Your family needs to spend more time in the sunshine.  Hopefully you'll have
a better winter.







"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 8:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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He wears swim trunks and a T-shirt to the beach. The modesty rules for men aren't as strict as the ones for women, but it's still not appropriate for him to run around shirtless in public. I'm not worried about him getting enough sunshine, as he's red-haired and spends lots of time outdoors.

All of us wear sandals and/or walk around barefoot in warm weather. The tops of my feet are always well tanned in the summertime.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Mayflowers
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 5:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
To the beach, I wear a 3/4 sleeved shirt, knee length full skirt, and leggings that come just past my knee, all sewn from bathing suit fabric..


That is not going to make D for you. You'd be better off going to the tanning salon and then you can take all your clothes off in private.  My salon is only $20 a month for unlimited tanning. I usually go from April to June and then stop after that because I'm going to the beach etc.
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Chloe
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 5:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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MF, is the light in a tanning salon the type of light that makes vitamin D?
Did your D level go up after tanning?  How much time do you spend for each tanning session?  Is your skin
fair?

Here's an article on how much skin needs to be exposed to the sun.

Types Of Sunlight Exposure
Sunshine contains several kinds of ultraviolet radiation, including what are known as Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Ultraviolet B rays. UVA rays do long-term damage to the skin and trigger diseases such as skin cancer, while UVB rays are responsible for giving you a sunburn. However, UVB rays are also healthy in small doses. The balance of UVA and UVB in sunlight changes throughout the day. Early morning and evening sunlight provides only UVA light, while UVB radiation is strongest the closer you get to noon. Latitude, season and atmospheric conditions can also affect the strength and concentration of UVB rays in sunlight. A UV Index rating of 2 or below means don't bother going outside -- you get risky UVA rays without the benefit of any UVB. Experts say not to intentionally expose your skin to sunlight when the UV index is less than 3.

Skin Type and Sunlight Absorption
It's not just the environment that affects UVB light absorption. Skin type is a major factor in how long you need to spend in the sun to produce a healthy level of vitamin D. The Fitzpatrick Skin Typing chart creates three skin types: Skin type I burns easily and doesn't tan at all; skin type II burns easily and tans with difficulty, such as those with freckles or red hair; and skin type III burns sometimes and tans moderately and uniformly. Since the 1970s, the categories have been expanded to include six skin types, ranging from very fair to very dark. The three additional categories are skin type IV, which burns rarely, tans moderately and easily; skin type V, which burns rarely and tans profusely; and skin type VI, which never burns and tans profusely.

How Much Skin Should Be Exposed to Sun?
The time and amount of skin exposed depends on both your skin type and environmental conditions such as the UV index. In good UVB light conditions -- a UV index of 3 or higher, between 10:30 a.m. and mid-afternoon -- adequate exposure requires about 50 to 75 percent of your skin being exposed. That's a lot of exposed skin, and not feasible for a lot of people who live places where it gets cold for long stretches of time. Exposing less skin will still allow you to absorb UVB rays, but more time is required the less skin that's exposed.

Examples and Exceptions
One way that dermatologists and other docs measure healthy sun exposure levels is with the Fitzpatrick Skin Typing chart. According to the chart, someone with skin type 1 would need to bare 50 to 75 percent of their skin to sunlight for 10 to 15 minutes, when the UV Index is between 3 and 5. Doing so several times per would likely get them to an optimal level of vitamin D. Someone with skin type III, meanwhile, would need 40 or more minutes in the sun to produce the same amount of vitamin D; and someone with skin type VI -- dark brown or dark black skin -- could need more than two hours. Age also plays a role, with adults 50 and older needing almost twice the amount of skin exposure or time exposed as younger adults.


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Mayflowers
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Chloe
MF, is the light in a tanning salon the type of light that makes vitamin D?
Did your D level go up after tanning?  How much time do you spend for each tanning session?  Is your skin fair? ]


Yes, these beds make vitamin D. Studies showed that people who went to a tanning salon had denser bones than people who didn't go and also higher vitamin D levels.   My D level went up to almost 46.  Very slow increase for me, but I think the tanning bed helped ( I only went a few months.. not year round') and also I was getting regular sun in the summer. I started out with 10 mins and slowly build up to 15-20 mins.  I'm 1/2 Italian and I tan. I have pretty fair skin but not as fair as a blonde or red head. I can tan a deep golden.

Basically skin cancer is a business.  Dermatologists who say slather on chemical sunscreen and stay out of the sun are making themselves a nice cancer business.  No vitamin D. No immune protection and cancer will form.. not from the sun but from the Dermatologist's so called advice.  Hey. How else are they going to make money? People need to stop letting people brain wash them, and stop listening to the "experts" and come to their own decisions about their health and do their own research.  See my signature? "Question Everything!!"

Revision History (4 edits)
815  -  Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:39pm
815  -  Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:35pm
815  -  Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:34pm
815  -  Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:33pm
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Chloe
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 6:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from 815


Yes, these beds make vitamin D. Studies showed that people who went to a tanning salon had denser bones than people who didn't go and also higher vitamin D levels.   My D level went up to almost 46.  Very slow increase for me, but I think the tanning bed helped and also I was getting regular sun in the summer. I started out with 10 mins and slowly build up to 15-20 mins.  I'm 1/2 Italian and I tan. I have pretty fair skin but not as fair as a blonde or red head.


I think you increased your D level more efficiently with tanning than supplementing.  46 is far
better than the 30s where you started.  Was your immune system better this past winter?



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Mayflowers
Friday, May 31, 2013, 1:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Chloe

I think you increased your D level more efficiently with tanning than supplementing.  46 is far
better than the 30s where you started.  Was your immune system better this past winter?


OMG yes! I didn't come down with the cold from Hades like I had been doing almost every spring   Plus I was getting bacterial infections too, UTI's and throat, skin..Which I didn't get this year..
I think age has much to do with absorption of D and/or metabolizing it.  I remember when Eric said he was taking 10,000 a day and his level went up to 80's in one year. He's young.  So for me 25 to 46 is a milestone and I did it in a little over 2 years.  And you know, if you have a safe base tan from the salon, you won't burn to a crisp if you go  the the beach When I was 20's, and I had a decent base tan, I could spend the whole day at the beach and only use 6 spf without burning.. I really hate getting burnt.  I know some people who live in FL have low D levels, probably because the darker your skin gets, the harder it is to make D, but you have the whole natural chemical protection against skin cancer, because I think there's other chemical reactions involved in the skin protecting itself as well as melanin that needs the sunlight to create these reactions.  So far people who've I read about who said they were sun worshippers and got melanoma, all said they burned a lot and didn't protect themselves because they wanted the deepest tan they could get.  When they talk about Australia as having the highest number of cases of melanoma, you're talking about people who originated from England..white skin who genetically were not engineered for the scorching sun of Australia. Stands to reason the melanoma cases would be high there.

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815  -  Friday, May 31, 2013, 1:55pm
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ruthiegirl
Friday, May 31, 2013, 2:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 815


That is not going to make D for you. You'd be better off going to the tanning salon and then you can take all your clothes off in private.  My salon is only $20 a month for unlimited tanning. I usually go from April to June and then stop after that because I'm going to the beach etc.


That just doesn't make any sense. My ancestors came from Northern and Eastern Europe and probably dressed as modestly as I do, if not more so (skirts were longer in those days, and I'm not sure if sleeve lengths typically went to the elbow or wrist in those days.) I assume they spent a lot of time working outside in all kinds of weather, but there's no way they were sunbathing in bikinis.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Chloe
Friday, May 31, 2013, 2:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl


That just doesn't make any sense. My ancestors came from Northern and Eastern Europe and probably dressed as modestly as I do, if not more so (skirts were longer in those days, and I'm not sure if sleeve lengths typically went to the elbow or wrist in those days.) I assume they spent a lot of time working outside in all kinds of weather, but there's no way they were sunbathing in bikinis.


You're just going to have to expose less skin for a longer period of time in order to get the
same effects as full body sunbathing.  My ancestors also came from Northern and Eastern
Europe and probably also dressed modestly. Nobody lived past the age of 60....so it's very
likely their health issues could have been prevented if they had the ability to be out in the
sunlight.  Women didn't sunbathe and men generally worked long hours indoors.

Interesting though was that my grandmother loved sunbathing.....She would go up on the
roof of her building in the Bronx and sit on a lawn chair with her dress above her knees...
I have photos of her roasting herself .  She lived to nearly 100.  One of the few women in
our family with such longevity.

My grandkids who live in FL were far healthier than my NY grandkids (Until they started taking
more minerals and vitamin D).  FL grandkids get a lot of sun....swim most days of the year....

But I don't think you have to worry about how much of your body is exposed given you're not
going to be going to a tanning salon or undressing beyond your comfort level.  Even men and
women who work outdoors are probably wearing shirts with sleeves, skirts or pants.  Even in tropical climates, natives aren't walking around in bikinis....They're going about their business in street clothes. And your D level isn't super low.  Your immune system isn't poor.

I think the point is just to get more sun than you presently get in order to raise your level of
D.....get enough magnesium so that D gets out of storage and into your bones.

You'll be fine!  



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Mayflowers
Friday, May 31, 2013, 3:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from ruthiegirl


That just doesn't make any sense. My ancestors came from Northern and Eastern Europe and probably dressed as modestly as I do, if not more so (skirts were longer in those days, and I'm not sure if sleeve lengths typically went to the elbow or wrist in those days.) I assume they spent a lot of time working outside in all kinds of weather, but there's no way they were sunbathing in bikinis.


Unless they took cod liver oil, IDK how they got enough vitamin D
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skillsaw
Friday, December 27, 2013, 1:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My vitamin d level was below normal so my doc told me to take 5000 iu per day. I did that for a few months and my level came up to 60. I was happy about that but did not notice any change in my health. Recently I heard this interview by Dr. Trutt who looked at all the data, clinical studies, meta analysis's of mortality studies, etc. and now recommends keeping your level around 35. Cancer rates and mortality is high at very very low levels than normalize at around 30-40 and than go up again. Here's the link. The whole program is a couple of hours and the discussion on vitamin d starts at about 1:01:30.  click on link and scroll down to the show on 7-29-13
http://www.kinetichifi.com/ecohealth/archives/
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skillsaw
Friday, December 27, 2013, 1:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I understand that this cuts across all blood types but correct me if I'm wrong I don't think DR D says different types need different amounts of vit.d. I also know that many clinical trials are faulty but this is an analysis of many reports not really studies. D levels were followed in people for years in different countries and the results were consistent. I was all for raising my level even more but after listening to the interview I'm cutting back on vit. D a bit. So many alt. and regular doctors are now saying raise, raise, raise your d level but perhaps the emperor has no clothes.  
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ruthiegirl
Friday, December 27, 2013, 3:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You also need to be careful about magnesium. Vitamin D synthesis uses up magnesium, and high dose D supplementation sometimes leads to low magnesium levels, if you're not taking adequate magnesium along with the D.  I wonder if low magnesium is the cause of health problems in people with high D levels.

In many cases, taking magnesium will raise vitamin D levels by increasing D absorption from the sun and from foods.

I'm not sure if low vitamin D is itself a risk factor, or if it's merely a sign that something is "out of balance" in the body. When you get lots of sunshine and minerals, you get healthier and vitamin D levels go up. Causation or merely correlation?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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