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 Non -Secretors and Time
Non-Secretor  and Time Flies (43 votes)
86.00%
Non-secretor and Time Moves Slowly (4 votes)
8.00%
Secretor and Time Flies (3 votes)
6.00%
Secretor and Time Moves Slowly (0 votes)
0%
50 Votes Total Last vote Tuesday, June 26, 2012, 10:19pm by nca
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Non-Secretors and Time  This thread currently has 5,618 views. Print Print Thread
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newtypeA
Sunday, February 21, 2010, 5:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 166
Gender: Female
Location: northeast Georgia
Age: 37
I've always been a slow mover. Working has forced me to learn to move a little faster, but I'm still slow compared to some of my coworkers. At home and at work I take too long to do things. (Not sure if this stems from a need to be thorough, or I'm just inefficient and clueless about working with time). I have a dayplanner, but never write in it--basically I just use the pockets for my cards and the ziploc bag for my stamps. (My calendar at home seems to keep me on track well enough.)

My birth dad told me I get this from him. He would tell me that he always moved slow too, and not to worry about it.
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Munchkin76
Sunday, February 21, 2010, 5:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami: Hunter (68%) / RH- / INFJ / Libra-Dragon
Ee Dan
Posts: 844
Gender: Male
Location: Colchester, UK
Age: 38
I'm very organised and good at forward planning (thus, I'm a freelance Planning Consultant)

I don't ever really stop and am constantly doing something (ants in my pants friends say) - I'm always seeing something else to be done.  Thus, time really seems to move quickly for me.

Andy


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

Andy Pandy��


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nwiser
Sunday, February 21, 2010, 7:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 279
Gender: Female
Location: Maryland
Age: 40
I am very organized as well, and feel like I am very productive, but it does come slowly....
I am very thorough and agree that it's probably the reason for the turtle pace. I'll start to work on a project and then switch over to another right in the middle. Then I have 2 projects that need finishing, which takes up more time. NOw, having a two year old, it's even worse because I only get increments of time to think about things
(which is hard if you're a perfectionist).

It could be (for me) that there is so much on my mind that I can't
just focus on the one thing. Also, when I do work on something, I always tell
people how I'm sure I do it the longest and hardest way there is.....maybe so
I don't have to think so much??? I don't know. It's just slow and steady and
works better for me to do things the more manual way.

So some days time flies, but other drag along. I do have OCD too (my house has to be clean and organized), and so that leads to plenty of thinking with less action. Hope this helps.


RH+, slight taster, Warrior
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DoS
Monday, February 22, 2010, 4:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

L (a-b+); Slight-Taster; INFJ; Warrior
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,988
Gender: Male
Location: Montana
Age: 29
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.
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Golfzilla
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

BTD 10/09/Swami Hunter 1/10/Taster/ISTJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,648
Gender: Male
Location: Atlanta, Ga.
Age: 61
Here is a question to ask oneself at the end of each day:

Am I pleased enough with what I accomplished today that I am at peace with exchanging a day of my life for it?




If you keep doing what you've always done, and you keep getting what you've aways got, perhaps it's time for a change...
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Oh no.  Somebody who's trying to get us to think.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from LauraT


However, I don't necessarily get a lot done each day.  I had a boyfriend who was a B bloodtype and an INFP who was always remarking on how many hours are in each day.  He worked two jobs, had a zillion hobbies, and still had time for trips and things.  However, he had no rituals.  It only took him 10 minutes to get ready each morning, and he never cooked or engaged in any 'night-time' rituals.  For me on the other hand, it takes about 2 hours to set up for the next day, clean up, calm down, get in bed, and actually fall asleep.



This sounds like DH (B Nomad).


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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paul clucas
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami-fied Explorer! INTP
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,795
Gender: Male
Location: Niagara Peninsula, On
Age: 47
Time flying is what people experience when their get lost in their thinking.

This can come from drugs, hypnotically altered states of mind, or over loading a gut with avoid starches.  If it is a constant issue the likely cause is inefficient neurological pathways.  Choose your own label, but our sense of time is not as firmly connected as it is for our more normal brothers and sisters.

An overlap of Explorers/Non-secretors seem be the carriers of this, but more study may help distinguish specific causes and categories.

Impaired Sensory Processing is at root a developmental problem with the ears.  All the other senses in a normally developed person tie into the neurological paths that were first made and connected by the ears.  When the ears go wrong, neurologically, the rest of the senses, and indeed your spontaneous thinking, lack a central integrating function.

We all develop little idiosyncratic ways of dealing with what we can't tolerate, like that delivery driver.  This propels us out of highly time-constrained situations.

Some of my high school level math students have issues in this direction.  When I told one of them about the frustration of my childhood experience, that person broke down and cried.  The recognition and validation of all the frustration they have experienced is not easy going.  Coming from a stranger, who quickly recognises in them what they cannot adequately put into words, is a powerful and shocking experience.

There is a gigantic deficit of quantity and quality of help that is available for people who have these issues.  This is a deeply disturbing subject to me.  I try not to think about the quantity of suffering as this can emotionally overwhelm me.


My weight loss goal: 220 lbs.  A 6'4" dyslexic oddball: the size of a line-backer, the silhouette of Winnie-the-Pooh.
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from nwiser
I'll start to work on a project and then switch over to another right in the middle. Then I have 2 projects that need finishing, which takes up more time. NOw, having a two year old, it's even worse because I only get increments of time to think about things
(which is hard if you're a perfectionist).

It could be (for me) that there is so much on my mind that I can't
just focus on the one thing. Also, when I do work on something, I always tell
people how I'm sure I do it the longest and hardest way there is.....maybe so
I don't have to think so much??? I don't know. It's just slow and steady and
works better for me to do things the more manual way.

So some days time flies, but other drag along. I do have OCD too (my house has to be clean and organized), and so that leads to plenty of thinking with less action. Hope this helps.


I feel like I can't get things done without doing other things first.  For example, I will think, "I should really put my exercise video on."  So I look at the living room floor and go, "Oh, well, I can't exercise because there's stuff on the floor.  Alright kids, let's clean up.  So we put away the toys, fold all the laundry, put it away, vacuum the floor, and by that time it's past lunch and everybody's hungry.  Then it's nap time and outside time and then time to start supper and I never get around to what I really wanted to do because it took so long to do the "first" stuff first.  And it's not that I was putting off the exercise.  I love it and it helps my severe back pain. So I have reason to do it.  I just struggle with actually doing what I want to do because I see everything else that has to be done first.  Same with school work.  We sit down to do it, but all I see is the scraps of paper they left on the floor, the markers without tops, the bookshelf that somehow got all mixed up and now the books are stacked vertically.  It's a conscious effort to ignore all the little things and actually get to what I want to do.

This may come from having a mother who was ultra-organized and I rarely had the opportunity to organize something myself.  She told me what to do.  She told all of us exactly what to do, and if we tried to do it a different way, that worked better for us, she'd fly off the handle.  Although she did know that if she gave me a project to do and just left me alone to do it, I would most certainly get it done, to the extreme, even if it took me all day.  But it was something I proved I could do over many years, and it's something she eventually learned.  "Clean out this pantry" was just what appealed to me.  I'd empty the entire thing, wipe it out, scrub it down, reorganize the whole thing, and put it all back perfectly.  If she wanted a job done well, she knew she could ask me to do it.  If she wanted something done fast, with just a once-over, she knew not to ask me to do it.  I couldn't.  So I don't know if that's temperament or upbringing.  But I still struggle with it.

Here's something funny that DH and I differ on.  He has a method for the dishwasher.  If a spoon doesn't come clean, he'll put it in the sink to be "worked on" later.  I'll see it in the sink and stick it back in the dishwasher.  The dishwasher deserves another try, right?  But he says, "If it didn't get clean in the dishwasher once, another trip through isn't going to help it any.  It needs to be done by hand."  But I don't much care---I'll just let it keep going through the dishwasher over and over.  


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from paul clucas
  When I told one of them about the frustration of my childhood experience, that person broke down and cried.  The recognition and validation of all the frustration they have experienced is not easy going.  Coming from a stranger, who quickly recognises in them what they cannot adequately put into words, is a powerful and shocking experience.


Yes, it is.  You have put me in tears more than once.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from paul clucas


There is a gigantic deficit of quantity and quality of help that is available for people who have these issues.  This is a deeply disturbing subject to me.  I try not to think about the quantity of suffering as this can emotionally overwhelm me.


You write a book and I'll edit it.

Or I'll write it.  Give me a few years while my children grow up.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Ribbit
Monday, February 22, 2010, 9:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
I just realized (while I was sitting there folding laundry and thinking about this thread) that it might be an issue of priorities.  If I make the working-out and the outside time and all those other things I want to do priorities, then I can let other things slip away.  I did that this morning.  I cleared just enough space on the floor to do the routine.  It was all I could do to relax and concentrate on stretching rather than looking at DD#1's scraps of fabric she forgot to put back after sewing some clothes for her bear.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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newtypeA
Monday, February 22, 2010, 10:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 166
Gender: Female
Location: northeast Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from DoS
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.


I hear you!
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Kumar
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

A1, Rh-ve, Teacher, ISTP
Autumn: Harvest, success.
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Age: 59
NewtypeA,

What you experience could be well related to our Personality Types and blood type has been  found to have its bearings on personality type. One personality dimension, "Judger Vs Perceiver," is related to what you (and others) have shared here. Someone who is more "perceiver" than a "judger" tends to have all the work styles (preferences) that you have described. I too am a perceiver than a judger. This dimension has to do with time too. Judgers tend to have relatively rigid schedule (calendar based, detail planning, regular updating and so on) whereas perceivers do not adhere to calendars (even if they try to keep one). Please not that perceivers have different ways of doing things and succeeding. Do not think that perceivers cannot succeed but simply they have different preference as to working style. My hunch is that there are more perceivers (and introverts) among A's and more judgers among O's. Welcome to the world of P's! (for perceiver)



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Possum
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Explorer/Gatherer
Ee Dan
Posts: 5,416
Gender: Female
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Age: 53
Quoted from Ribbit
I just realized (while I was sitting there folding laundry and thinking about this thread) that it might be an issue of priorities.  If I make the working-out and the outside time and all those other things I want to do priorities, then I can let other things slip away.  I did that this morning.  I cleared just enough space on the floor to do the routine.  It was all I could do to relax and concentrate on stretching rather than looking at DD#1's scraps of fabric she forgot to put back after sewing some clothes for her bear.
I'm glad you got them done - seeing as you said they help your back... Shouldn't that be your priority if you can make it that!!??
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Ribbit
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Yeah, but I see so much stuff I need to get done first.  Like moving things out of the way.  And I don't know when to stop (like moving just enough stuff to be able to do my job) and I just keep cleaning and cleaning and cleaning.  It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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nwiser
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 2:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 279
Gender: Female
Location: Maryland
Age: 40
Ribbit - you said it pretty well. I understand what you're saying exactly, and I'll add a little:
The things I get done in a day are the same things, day by day.
Yes, I folded laundry and cleaned the kitchen, but tomorrow the same
things have to be done. So I feel productive, but in the end I look back
and think I'm just in machine mode. Now getting something EXTRA done,
like hanging a shelf or dusting the fans, or organizing a closet is
the best feeling and then I can truly justify  scratching something off my list.
Even if it's phone calls to setup appointments and such.


RH+, slight taster, Warrior
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Munchkin76
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 10:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami: Hunter (68%) / RH- / INFJ / Libra-Dragon
Ee Dan
Posts: 844
Gender: Male
Location: Colchester, UK
Age: 38
Quoted from Ribbit
Yeah, but I see so much stuff I need to get done first.  Like moving things out of the way.  And I don't know when to stop (like moving just enough stuff to be able to do my job) and I just keep cleaning and cleaning and cleaning.  It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.


OMG, Leanne I'm so with you on this!!

This is exactly what happens to me - I get an awful lot done, but it takes me time because I see everything else that needs doing.  I can take most of the day to clean house because I'm so thorough (your childhood pantry clean comes to mind).  I have to take everything off the shelves and dust and wipe etc and it does take time to be thorough.  My partner would happily do a superficial tidy and run the floor duster over the floors (as opposed to vacuuming and mopping) - I just see the things that aren't done and cringe.  Having said that, I have got better at just letting it go and relaxing when the standards of others aren't the same as mine .

OCD, perhaps or maybe we're just detail conscious?  Nonnie connection  

Kumar, interesting what you said about the MBTI (judger vs. perceiver) types.  I was always moving between I/E NFP, whereas now I come up as an ENFJ.  This is probably because of my work - I'm a planning consultant and managed projects like the Channel Tunnel Rail Link etc.  It's all tight schedules, deadlines, logistics, costs, performance etc....

This thread is really thought provoking

Andy


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

Andy Pandy��


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Ribbit
Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 1:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
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Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from Ribbit
It's like I can reign myself in and do just the bare minimum.  Maybe OCD.


That should read can't.

I'm learning to relax too, Andy.  It's impossible to do what I feel like needs to be done.  If I didn't have children I would be much more obsessive-compulsive.  Having them around requires me to relax and just take life as it comes (actually, I probably learned that most from my first baby who wasn't just colicky--she was extremely colicky and hardly ever slept).  If I didn't allow myself to be remoulded by them, all of us would be constantly angry at each other.  


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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paul clucas
Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 3:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami-fied Explorer! INTP
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,795
Gender: Male
Location: Niagara Peninsula, On
Age: 47
Ribbit, what you are talking about in post 33 is what I call Narrow Focus.  

The peripheral vision of your thoughts are limited; you can see trees, but not the woods.  It is a defence against too much data coming in at one time.  This copies the coping mechanism of the ears.  When the neurological focusing function of the ears is not working there are two options.  The ears are totally open to all sound is the normal or default setting.  This makes you tired, nervous, and frustrated.  The other option that is used to get a break from the default is closing the ear to one narrow region of control, which has to be managed on a more-or-less conscious level.  This just changes the quantity and quality of the negative effects, but allows some limited useful interaction with the world.

Normally people have a flexible control over what they are paying attention to.  Normally the Focus is a big as the person wants.  Some are capable of two or more separate focuses and this is most useful in the housework/childcare combination.  I took a lot of the care of my daughter for the first three years of her life, so this is not unfamiliar to me.  

There is something psychologically cleansing about taking one part of the house and making it totally clean.  

Quoted from Ribbit
Yes, it is.  You have put me in tears more than once.
Am not wanting/meaning to hurt you.  

I'm clumsy with emotions at the best of times.  Had to hide behind British stiff upper lip when student started shedding, but did not use the brisk manly insensitivity.


Quoted from newtypeA
Quoted from DoS
I prefer to move at my own comfortable pace and tend towards making things quality oriented. This rarely fits what others want.
I hear you!
I urge you to both think about the implicaions of what you are choosing.

In order to have control of what concerns you, there are two choices you can make.

Acquire more power to affect your environment and the environment of others so that you can make things happen according to your will.  The extreme of this is megalomania.
~ or ~
Grow less concerned with others, so that you can be happier without controlling more of the environment.  The extreme of this is an almost autistic existence.

Neither direction allows for the maturation of the personality.

This, thankfully, is a false dilemma.  You can find another ways to deal with the compromises necessary to a productive and sociable life.  They usually involve recognising that there is an Authority in life to which you must be held accountable.  I am being vague here because so many people on this board have so many different ideas as to what this should entail.  Despite the difference of opinion as to what the Authority is, there is a commonality as to the need for one.


Quoted from Munchkin76
Kumar, interesting what you said about the MBTI (judger vs. perceiver) types.  I was always moving between I/E NFP, whereas now I come up as an ENFJ.  This is probably because of my work - I'm a planning consultant and managed projects like the Channel Tunnel Rail Link etc.  It's all tight schedules, deadlines, logistics, costs, performance etc....
Andy you should look at all the times Isa has talked about introverts extroverting as their opposites in public.  

An INFP will appear to be a E_TJ (where N/S factor is not clear.)  The last two letters become the opposite of what they truly are.  It is a development necessary for future growth and individuation, and releases part of the shadow (ESTJ) to do useful work.  Assuming that INFP is correct, your shadow is the typical type that works best with large corporations.  Read up about types and you will arm yourself to deal with others in a greater variety of ways.  It is a wonderful tool that can open new views of life to you!  


My weight loss goal: 220 lbs.  A 6'4" dyslexic oddball: the size of a line-backer, the silhouette of Winnie-the-Pooh.
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newtypeA
Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+
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Posts: 166
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Age: 37
Believe me, I have had to do a LOT OF ADJUSTING to accomodate the wills of others at work. Every job I've ever held has required me to learn to move faster to keep up with others. I certainly don't expect the world to adjust to me, and I rarely get my way on any given day. That's just the way it is.
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battle dwarf
Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI explorer
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,157
Gender: Female
Location: ARKANSAS
Age: 32
time depends on what i am doing. if i have something to do it can fly very fast. if i am wating for something (ie. midnight so i can close store and go home) it can crawl. sometimes i drive the boss nut "is it tomarrow yet?" today i had off and despite all the things i want to do i am talking on the net, mostly becuse i want to go outside and it is just plain too cold to play in the dirt. fling buy becuse i am doing something not just waiting for the right time to do something.


nothing to do? who has that!?
swami made me an explorer!
married to an AB+ mom to a B+ boy
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Munchkin76
Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 9:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami: Hunter (68%) / RH- / INFJ / Libra-Dragon
Ee Dan
Posts: 844
Gender: Male
Location: Colchester, UK
Age: 38
Paul

Thanks for your brilliant (as always) insights !

I will indeed do some revision on the types.  I did a lot of study of typology theory (including MBTI) many moons ago at uni (Psych grad plus post-grad).

Now where are all those books again......

Andy


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

Andy Pandy��


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Ribbit
Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 10:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Quoted from paul clucas


Am not wanting/meaning to hurt you.  



No, no, noooooo!  Not at all.  Tears because somebody understands!  You know what it's like.  Every non-secretor knows what it's like.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Robyn Mc
Friday, February 26, 2010, 5:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+, Hunter, PROP ST, INTJ
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Location: Northern CA
Age: 52
GolfZ, sounds like we need to think about that one before we start our day, so it is spent well!    Thanks for the really deep thought!

For me, it is easy to get caught up in new projects and things that pop up throughout the day.  I have many projects going at one time...it's a family joke that I am all about "getting stuff done".  I'm always moving.  I prefer to be very thorough, but have learned to let some of details go, when necessary.  Sometimes, you need a once-over kind of job because there are other priorities and at other times, a thorough job is desired. I guess that's just part of the maturing process for us all and it's a continuous process.  

Like Ribbit, I often suffer from the, "I really want/need to do "this", but I need to get THAT done first along with THAT and another THAT"...  So I have to ask myself, how important is THIS or THAT in the long term?  Is it more important that I exercise today, or do my floors really need to be clean?  Of course, it's easy for us all to come to the conclusion that the "exercise" is the most important for the long-term.  So it should be an easy decision.  However, some days...the floor seems of paramount importance to my sense of well-being and inner peace of mind!     On those days, I just go with it and focus on the fact that I am getting some exercise with the floor cleaning and the next time I lay down my exercise mat, I will feel much better!    

While I tend to be very efficient and all about getting things done, I also side-track fairly easily and something else becomes a priority.  However, when pressure is on, I get the job done.  But when there is no pressure, I side-track.  Come to think of it, I do my best work in a pressure cooker.  Sometimes, I even put things off until it becomes a pressure situation.  I operate really well under stress--but for short periods of time.  It's been a process to learn to pace myself.  Not 100 percent there yet, but I get better all the time.  We could go into all the whys of why I operate that way...is it my nonnie O temperament?  Did diet play a role?  Was it learned?  I will say that I can tell that diet affects my mood, my focus, my sense of well-being.  

I once had a very wise woman who taught me to live in the moment...if you are doing the dishes, enjoy that moment.  When she first told me that (I was a mother of two in my late twenties) I thought she was totally crazy.  I was taught and always tended to think about just getting the next thing done and not enjoying the moment I was in.  I didn't enjoy my children nearly as much as I could have because I was often thinking about stuff that needed to get done, rather than just sitting on the floor and playing with them...Ribbit, you sound like an AWESOME mom and I love your posts!  Anyway, she planted the seed and I continue to reflect on it and eventually made it a priority to live in the moment.  

It's taken years of practice, but I am finally getting there with the enjoying of the moment...Good Lord, did I just sidetrack?  What was I supposed to be doing today?  

Enjoy the day, all!    


shine!
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