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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Nonnie Clubhouse  ›  Nonnie recipes!
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Teresa S and 4 Guests

Nonnie recipes!   This thread currently has 12,551 views. Print Print Thread
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Patty Lee
Friday, March 3, 2006, 4:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Ee Dan
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Kate,
Collards *might* be a little bitter, but chard & spinach do work well.  Kale might, too--haven't tried it.  I also sometimes throw sprouts in, but I can generally taste sprouts (at least broccoli sprouts, which have a little ZING to them)--may not please all palates.

If you get any good variants, let me know!  


(formerly plhartless).

"One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
--Virginia Woolf
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Whimsical
Friday, March 3, 2006, 5:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto
Kyosha Nim
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Sorry, I think I meant to say chard, not collards!  I have tried to eat chard in my salads and I'm not a big fan, so maybe this will work to get it in me!  Collards I like much better, so no need to sneak them in!


MIFHI E-185
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slyparrot
Tuesday, March 14, 2006, 10:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Whimiscal,  You and I are alike in so many attributes......but not the collards!  Puueeyy!  


Type O+, Non-Secretor, Explorer, Super-Taster, Virgo, ESTP and Libertarian 
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Patty Lee
Friday, June 16, 2006, 3:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Ee Dan
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I made a really nice "salad" yesterday using toasted sesame seeds, steamed kale (I have a BUNCH right now:  it's in season), sesame oil, pomegranate juice, dried cranberries, jicama, carrots, nutritional yeast, dulse flakes, and salt.  I think another fresh fruit in there would be nice--something that'd go well with the sesame oil.  Ideas?  Of course, I could just go with a less-strong oil, like walnut or olive, and then use berries or other fruit.


(formerly plhartless).

"One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
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Debra+
Friday, June 16, 2006, 4:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Swiss chard, spinach, broccoli, garlic and ginger make a really nice soup.  Just cook them up together with water or compliant broth until soft and whip in your blender/food processor or hand held whizzer to make it creamy and smooth.  For variations add whatever veggies (kale, turnip, asparagas, kholorabi, collard greens, okra, etc.) you like or don't like for the benefits of the veggies.  Pour over appropriate protein if you like.  Yummalicious.

Debra

Patty Lee-your salad sounds so good too.  Will pick some kale up to try on the weekend.


"Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves." C.G. Jung"

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Patty Lee
Saturday, June 17, 2006, 7:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Ee Dan
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Yum, Debra!  I love a good soup.  I sort of get out of the habit in the summer, but I do love it so much, and that's so chock-full of good stuff!  Especially since I have a load of produce that I won in our farmer's market raffle and I can't use it fast enough.  A bowl of green soup is on the menu this week!

Do broccoli worms count as compliant protein?  


(formerly plhartless).

"One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well."
--Virginia Woolf
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RhodaMaria
Sunday, December 3, 2006, 3:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Kate, Debra and all other recipeproviding people!!


Woww!!! Awesome recipes guys!!  
Next tuesday I will have an O nonnie for dinner...
Well, no problem with the foods...!!

Dolma's (Debra's fave!!!) with chicoryleaves, carrots, dressing  and egss as an appetizer!!

Then salmon with veggy stirfry

and for dessert Kate's amaranth mixture for waffles made as pancakes with blueberry marmelade.. and green tea for my guest and coffee with dark chocolate for me..

Thanks gals....  you are awesome Nonnies!!!!  

Cocky  
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Drea
Sunday, December 3, 2006, 4:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Cocky
Dolma's (Debra's fave!!!) with chicoryleaves, carrots, dressing  and egss as an appetizer!!


Cocky, these dolmas sound great. Are they store bought or homemade? I've not seen chickory leaves, fresh or otherwise. I've only eaten dolmas made with grape leaves.


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
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RhodaMaria
Sunday, December 3, 2006, 5:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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hi Drea!

Yes the dolmas are readily made!! I buy them canned in the shop. The come from Turkey..
Indeed rice with herbs in grapeleaves..
I will decorate them with chicory leaves and some carrots..  

My O nonnie guest can't have the dolmas with goatcheese decorated, so this is my alternative..

Cocky
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Alia Vo
Sunday, December 3, 2006, 5:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from VeryGnawty
VeryGnawty's Meal Replacement Cookie v1.08
fully type O compliant (Now with more hype!)

Ingredients
2 large eggs
2 cups mashed bananas
1/4 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 cup ground flaxseeds (or walnuts)
2 cups brown rice flour
1/4 cup olive oil

Directions:

Mix ingredients together thoroughly.  Place the dough on a lightly-oiled cookie sheet.  Form the dough into desired shape.

Bake at 300 degrees Fahrenheit for about 10-15 minutes.


Thanks for sharing the recipe; the cookies sound interesting and not overwhelmingly sweet.  As an A secretor, bananas are not on my eating list, but I think another fruit can be used to substitute the bananas.  

Alia



Alia A. Vo
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shells
Sunday, December 31, 2006, 1:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yummoo !! Nearly all these recipes sound great  

Can someone please tell me what chards and collards are??  Or at least another word for each?  We don't seem to have them down here down under with those names    
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Alia Vo
Monday, January 1, 2007, 1:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Hi shells,

As follows is more information on chard and collards courtesy of TYPEbase4:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?7
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?61

They are both great dark leafy cooking greens that are beneficial or neutral with each of the ABO blood groups.  They can be prepared in many ways and meld with many types of foods and cuisines.  

Chard comes in many varieties.  I've enjoyed green chard, swiss chard, and rainbow chard.  Visually, rainbow chard is a beautiful vegetable with contrasting colors of yellow, red, and green.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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shells
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 1:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer Rh -
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Thanks Alia Vo - didn't realise I've been eating these items for years!

They are sold in our markets as loose mixed salad leaves & in our supermarkets in cellophane bags labelled the same (they have other interesting leaves in there as well but not as nice)   Never thought of cooking these - tended to use English spinach - will certainly try these now!

Thanks again  
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Alia Vo
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 7:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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It's good that you've been consuming these greens and reaping their powerhouse of nutrients.

Interesting that they are sold as part of a salad mix.  Collard greens usually need cooking as they are a 'tougher' greens, albeit some people do eat them raw.  The picture in TYPEBase4 is rather misleading because one can not tell if the collard leaf is soft/hard.

xox,
Alia


Alia A. Vo
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gulfcoastguy
Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 4:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Here is a recipe from today's paper that needs just a little tweaking

Prevencal Braised Lamb Shanks

2 teaspoons paprika
1/2 teaspoon crushed rosemary or thyme
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
4 lamb shanks about 3 lds or so
3/4 cup all purpose flour(spelt would do)
1 table spoon olive oil
2 cups chopped onion
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 bay leaf
1 cup white wine
1 cup chicken broth(make appropriate substitute)
1 and 1/2 cup tomato marina sauce(could use the tomato sauce sub from Recipebase)
zest and juice of 1 lemon
1/3 cup of oil cured pitted black olives (not exactly BTD use your own judgement)

season lamb shanks with herbs and spices, dredge in flour, brown in dutch oven, add other ingredients, and bake in 325 F oven for 2 hours. Any body who wants to move this to Cook's Right feel free to do so.
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Lola
Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 11:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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thanks!

already added the recipe to lamb, on typebase, upon your request.


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Dressage_Buff
Tuesday, April 24, 2007, 4:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Forgive me, but i'm confused...  Can B nonnies have fresh ground black/white peppercorns?  I have been avoiding, because i thought i have to, but now i don't know.  Thanks - Nancy
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Victoria
Tuesday, April 24, 2007, 6:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes, freshly ground pepper is fine.  
Packaged pre-ground pepper is not, because of it's tendency to grow mold.



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Cathy
Friday, June 15, 2007, 9:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I am in the baking mode.  My husband wants (and so do I might I add ) a peach cake for dessert.  I am using white spelt flour but the recipes I am working with call for sugar.  What do I use to substitute the sugar and still have the fluffy volume of what a cake should have?  I've been working on it and am not getting anywhere to fast.

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gulfcoastguy
Friday, June 15, 2007, 9:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Vegetable glycerine, 1/2 the amount shown for sugar.
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Alia Vo
Friday, June 15, 2007, 10:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Cathy,
In lieu of the sugar, you can utilize agave syrup (use half or one third of the amount called for in the original recipe).

You can use rapadura (use equal amount) and maple sugar.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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Cathy
Friday, June 15, 2007, 10:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Should I increase the flour to keep the volume of the cake up and fluffy?   (since I am then using the vegetable glycerine or agave?)  I've been finding the cakes I've been making are actually very heavy and dense since I don't put in the cup of sugar.
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Cathy
Friday, June 15, 2007, 10:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hmmm.....Maple sugar.  I didn't know I could eat that.  Hmmm.....  You've given me something to think about.
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gulfcoastguy
Saturday, June 16, 2007, 12:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Spelt tends to make more dense breads than wheat so it stands to reason cakes would be more dense. With the exception of Brighid's carrot cake I tend to make cheesecakes or pies myself.
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Alia Vo
Sunday, June 17, 2007, 3:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Cathy,
I think you can use white spelt flour and whole spelt flour measure for measure as called for in recipes calling for 1 cup of {wheat} flour.  

When baking with other flours, I have tended to mix together a combination of various types together; I have used a combination of brown rice flour, oat flour, amaranth flour, and I believe rye flour.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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