Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  Cerebral Plasticity: Brain Exercise: Puzzles, etc.
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 4 Guests

Cerebral Plasticity: Brain Exercise: Puzzles, etc.  This thread currently has 3,531 views. Print Print Thread
3 Pages 1 2 3 All Recommend Thread
san j
Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 9:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Do you work out, cerebrally?

LR4YT recommends such as Crossword Puzzles for Bs.
In my family, my A father, A brother, and I always did the NYTimes Puzzle every Sunday. To make it more challenging, I timed it and only used ink. Then I discovered the London puzzles and the Acrostics. It's been years since I've been in the habit, but sometimes I find myself in a waiting room and indulge.

Occasionally I come up against a puzzle in which the clues contain so many Pop Culture references that I'm at a distinct disadvantage, being out of that loop for decades. But most of the time I'm in untarnished form.
I haven't really pushed the Sudoku-style endeavor, and I see there are numerous spin-off forms of this gaining popularity in the papers. Maybe I'll try those soon.

My favorite has, of course, got to be languages. I read aloud just about every day in several.
I also really like learning about totally new fields -- venturing into whole new departments in the bookstore, discovering new websites, reading totally unfamiliar subjects.

It's not as if I'm looking deliberately to "work out"; I'm just doing what I find fun, following my natural bent. I wonder if other Bs find this natural or, rather, find themselves having to push themselves to take Dr. D's advice to exercise the grey matter.

What about non-B's? Jump in:
Do you fancy mental exercise? Which ones in particular?


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message
Joy
Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 11:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
My mother and father used to do the NY Times Crossword puzzle everyday after breakfast.
They didn't do it in ink and they had several dictionaries (but only used them as a last resort.)

After my father passed my mother continued to do the puzzles and/ as you know, the NY Times    
puzzles get progressively more difficult as the week goes on.

In her early nineties she still worked on the puzzles that were sent to her in a book through the Times.   When I was visiting one time she was working on a puzzle that when finished it gave you a clue that you had to figure out.  She completed the puzzle and got the clue.  I was very impressed and told her so.

I did the Times puzzle when I lived in NY but don't anymore.  Now I am obsessed with Lexulous (online scrabble)  I play against the computer (because I don't have the patience to wait for someone in a game to figure out the word they want to use plus I don't like the pressure and time restraints.

I also enjoy "Freerice.com". It has become more diverse and added new subjects over time .
I mainly do the English Vocabulary and the word meanings have a range of 1-60.  I've gotten to 46 at times but I usually pick levels between 35-40.  

Everytime you answer correctly they donate 10 grains of rice to feed the hungry.  There are groups on the site that you can join and they compete to see who has the highest score for that week.

Joy  (Brain exercises from an A.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 61
jeanb
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 3:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 979
Gender: Female
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
I read at least 2 different books a week, 1 fiction 1 non-fiction.  I work in ERP recovery and business consulting, so I usually learn 2-3 different erp systems every year and then learn a business or 2 on top of that.  

I train at least 50 people per year in payroll, gl, job maintenance and setup.  I think learning and then teaching the information keeps my brain happy.  I usually do some snowboard race volunteering, timing and race secretary a few times per year which makes me keep up the the FIS handbook of rules.  

I seem to learn even more quickly when I have lots to learn.  

I don't like games and I really don't like online games...but my brain is full of useless information because of all of the reading I do.

My mother seemed to deteriorate even more quickly when she gave up all of her volunteering.  I don't know if she couldn't do the work anymore brainwise, so she gave it up, or she was tired, gave it up and her brain deteriorated.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 61
san j
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 4:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
These are great!
I was not familiar with Lexulous or freerice, Joy.
And, jeanb: My brain is chock full of information, too, due to plenty reading, but - heck - I don't consider it useless. I find some use for it, one way or other, even if it lies dormant a long time...And learning businesses is really really interesting, when you're in business. I used to do that in my "youth", to pitch to all sorts of prospective clients, developing advertising plans based on the competitive market and various media opportunities. A surprisingly creative endeavor. Thanks for reminding me of the fun value there.

Joy: Dictionaries are/were absolutely off limits for me. I do as much as I can, unassisted. When I've done so, the watch is stopped and time noted. Just another option; it really helps to improve speed. You can always look things up later, if you're really curious...


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 61
Jacquie
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 9:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior
Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 97
Gender: Female
Location: New Jersey
Age: 26
I just checked this website out recently - http://www.lumosity.com/app/v4/personalization

And I'm currently reading this book which has lots of interesting information in it about the brain - http://www.amazon.com/The-Brai.....rds=change+the+brain
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 4 - 61
Joy
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 6:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Sanj,

Let me be even clearer about the way my parents did the NY Times puzzle.

First of all since they were retired doing the puzzles together after breakfast was a relaxing mind exercise and they did not enjoy being timed.  Some people thrive on the challenge of being timed and that's fine.  They enjoyed each other's company and only used the dictionaries if they could not figure the word into the puzzle.  Alot of times they had filled in most of the puzzle themselves.

They were both in their eighties and still wanted to keep their minds active.  

Joy

I hope, if you choose either online game I mentioned ,that you find they are enjoyable and meet your criteria for keeping your brain cells active.  I find them addictive.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 5 - 61
SquarePeg
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 7:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,488
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
I don't need a brain work out -- it's always working.  Doing Sodoku or Jumble is my way of giving the brain a rest.

This isn't meant as a brag -- I didn't say that my brain is always working well.  


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 61
Jane
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 7:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,721
Gender: Female
Location: Metrowest Boston, MA
Age: 70
I do the crossword puzzles in the Boston Globe which also get progressively harder during the week.  I also really like the Kenken puzzles which also get more difficult as the week goes on.  The easy ones are too easy but the harder ones are fun.  It's similar to Sudoku but doesn't take so long to do.  I normally do them as relaxation when I come home from work.  I'm also really into Words with Friends and have multiple games going on at the same time. I recently joined Lumosity but haven't had the time to do much of it yet. I also bought the book about brain function.
I'm not so structured about the books I read as Jeanb is but I love to read good fiction.  That seems to go in spurts for me.
As most of you know, my Mom suffered with Alzheimer's for over 10 years so brain function is a priority for me.  
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 61
san j
Thursday, January 17, 2013, 10:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Joy
Let me be even clearer about the way my parents did the NY Times puzzle.

First of all since they were retired doing the puzzles together after breakfast was a relaxing mind exercise and they did not enjoy being timed.  Some people thrive on the challenge of being timed and that's fine.  They enjoyed each other's company and only used the dictionaries if they could not figure the word into the puzzle.  Alot of times they had filled in most of the puzzle themselves.

They were both in their eighties and still wanted to keep their minds active.

That sounds good to me, Joy. There are certainly many ways to do a puzzle!  
I had a boyfriend who was also hooked on the Times puzzle, so I invented this method of doing it together - vastly different from your parents'?
One of us would answer all the Across clues - the other would answer all the Downs. You could ask the other person "Mind looking at 51 Down? I need that one." This method prevented traffic jams, when two young whippersnappers sat side by side with a couple of pens.
Another way to role-assign is By Subject: Someone may be up on Theatre, the other on Science, for instance...

Quoted from SquarePeg
I don't need a brain work out -- it's always working.  Doing Sodoku or Jumble is my way of giving the brain a rest.

Hi, SquarePeg. Actually, you're not giving your brain a rest. You're simply giving different cells/neurochemicals a workout. Your brain isn't "resting", even when you are fast asleep. So by keeping different functions limber - even if it feels "restful" and effortless - you are, say the brain scientists, doing yourself as much of a favor as you are doing yourself by engaging in a range of physical exercises.

Just because I time my puzzle-doing doesn't mean it's not a very relaxing activity for me, too. Indeed there are many, many athletes, including the pros, who say they enter a kind of "zone" at the peak of balanced performance, that feels like a sort of relaxation...



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 8 - 61
san j
Friday, January 18, 2013, 10:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
I tried a Kakuro puzzle, and it was frustrating for me.
Sudoku is easier.
I did a KenKen easily, but there was - incredibly - a significant typo in the instructions that certainly hung up some novices.

These are all numeric (as opposed to verbal) cross"word" forms of puzzles,
But it does me good to learn/try these, too.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 61
Amazone I.
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 9:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+ GT 4...E/..INTJ ....prop.=non-taster..
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 16,380
Gender: Female
Location: CH-Benglen Kanton Z�rich
Age: 57
as far as you're still able to change your agreements in full awareness... no needs to
come along with whatever...coz it's done and adapted automatically .......

but it also will /can be that I'm talkin in     pictures.....

sorry DOS neither am I nuts nor psychically deprived...I am only  an explorer E/INTP ! ......... any further judgements ???????????


MIfHI K-174

Revision History (1 edits)
Amazone I.  -  Saturday, January 19, 2013, 4:40pm
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 61
Ribbit
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 4:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
I like word games like Scrabble and Scattergories.  They're the only games I truly excel at. The children and DH will play Sequence, but I'm too dyslexic (or something) to play it.  The chaos on the board confuses me.  

We don't get the newspaper, but whenever we're at my inlaws' house, I do the little puzzle with the pun.  I don't remember what it's called. Scrambled? You have to unscramble a list of words and then figure out what the little pun/joke is.  Except I don't have to unscramble the words.  That's cheating.   I can pretty quickly figure out the pun based on the information given, the picture and the number of letters needed in the answer.  It's fun.

When we were teenagers nobody would let my sister and I be on the same team in Taboo.  Because of my love for words (my sister called me a walking thesaurus), it wasn't a difficult game to play.

But number games?  No, sir.  Can't do them.

Now I do love Set.  Set is an awesome card game that requires you to match colors/amounts/patterns very quickly.  It's great fun.

I gotta pick on Goldie here.  She likes to talk about young people being the way they are because they've spent their childhood watching TV. We didn't have a TV growing up.  We had pets and games and jigsaw puzzles.  And tools.  So we'd grow a gigantic garden all 3/4 of the year, clear small trees for bike trails through the woods, build forts, fish in the neighbor's pond, play games or sing hymns and folk songs in the evenings as a family, and there was almost always either a Risk game, Monopoly game, or jigsaw puzzle being worked on.  We also all play musical instruments.  So.....Not all "young" people are a certain way because they watch too much TV.  Some of us *aren't* like that because we *didn't* watch TV.  Some of us *are* like "that" (whatever "that" may be) despite no TV.  I wanted to say that on a different thread earlier in the week, but that thread was closed and I didn't get the chance.  

At any rate, our kids don't watch TV either.  Every night we read out loud to them and play a game of their choice.  I hope our children grow up loving to use their brains.  


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 61
gulfcoastguy
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,446
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
I (like my granmother before me) work the crossword puzzles almost every day. Usually the LA Times version as I can only get the NY times version on sunday. The only online game I play is Mah Jong but I'm pretty good at Gin Rummy and Poker. If I had more time I might play more games online but that would cut into time for reading, cooking, cleaning, gardening, yoga ect.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 61
Joy
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 5:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Ribbit,

I do agree with you about sequence games.  It befuddles my ADD mind (I'm sure alot of people don't or can't understand that but it is what it is).

I love, love, love (yup I do) interior design and space planning and fabrics and patterns.  So, having stated how I feel in no uncertain terms, please tell me where I can get the cards to play the game "Set".  

Thanks.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 61
Ribbit
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 6:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 37
Oh, oh, oh, you'll like Set then.  

http://www.setgame.com/set/

I think we found it at Toys R Us.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 14 - 61
Jacquie
Saturday, January 19, 2013, 8:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior
Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 97
Gender: Female
Location: New Jersey
Age: 26
I fail at Scrabble. I can only ever think of 4-5 letter words for some reason. It's not like I have a terrible vocabulary either. Just don't enjoy it. I love Scattergories though. Never gets old.

I personally find that TV/movies activate empathy (emotional intelligence) for me so I guess everyone is different in that department and it also depends what you are watching as one show can vastly differ from another.

I like to write (poetry and fantasy world), read and paint a lot too. Creating is good for the brain.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 15 - 61
Joy
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 3:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Ribbit,

This is how I'm reading your post:  There's an understanding about creative pursuits and games.
I never heard of this game but I feel I have to have it to keep my creative juices flowing.

Now I'm reading about the link you posted to get the game called Set.  It is about visual perception.
Great!

Last line says you may have gotten the game at "Toys R Us"!  Uh, oh.  This is a kid's game.  I can't possibly go into a store like that and buy that game.  Unless I rent a child (which some parents according to the kind of day they're having just might agree for a certain amount of cash).  I could also borrow a child (again ,for a fee , and then the parent will be lurking in the background making sure the kid is ok), or pretend I'm buying it for my grandchildren.

None of the above are feasible.  Oh well, I am so obsessed with keeping my creativity active that I might just boldly go in the store and buy the game, anyway.

Joy

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 16 - 61
ABJoe
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 4:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

35% Nomad or Teacher - health history dependent
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,305
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
Quoted from Joy
I can't possibly go into a store like that and buy that game.

None of the above are feasible.  Oh well, I am so obsessed with keeping my creativity active that I might just boldly go in the store and buy the game, anyway.

Why not?  You don't have to say anything to anyone about why you want the game.  As long as you want it and are willing to pay for it, they'll sell it to you without you having to discuss any intent.  

Just go buy it and enjoy keeping your creativity alive.


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
Logged Online
Private Message Private message Reply: 17 - 61
Joy
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 4:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
ABJoe,

Again, thanks.  I guess I'm just a bit self conscious.  


Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 18 - 61
san j
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 4:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Joy

Last line says you may have gotten the game at "Toys R Us"!  Uh, oh.  This is a kid's game.  I can't possibly go into a store like that and buy that game.  Unless I rent a child (which some parents according to the kind of day they're having just might agree for a certain amount of cash).  I could also borrow a child (again ,for a fee , and then the parent will be lurking in the background making sure the kid is ok), or pretend I'm buying it for my grandchildren.

None of the above are feasible.  Oh well, I am so obsessed with keeping my creativity active that I might just boldly go in the store and buy the game, anyway.


I'm thinking you're putting us on. But it seems like an awful lot of verbiage, so maybe you really *are* phobic about toy stores?  
If so, definitely start a thread on it - tell us more about this.



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 19 - 61
Jacquie
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 10:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior
Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 97
Gender: Female
Location: New Jersey
Age: 26
Everyone is a kid inside
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 20 - 61
Joy
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 6:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Jacquie,

In one sentence you summed it up!  

I was putting you on a bit, Sanj, but one thing about kids when they are young they "play" unconditionally.  

As we all grow older we are conditioned.  Sometimes, as is my case, I'm trying to become aware of "unlearning" some of the things I learned.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 21 - 61
san j
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 6:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Joy
Jacquie,

In one sentence you summed it up!  

I was putting you on a bit, Sanj, but one thing about kids when they are young they "play" unconditionally.  

As we all grow older we are conditioned.  Sometimes, as is my case, I'm trying to become aware of "unlearning" some of the things I learned.

Joy

Wish I could follow. Are you saying you learned to avoid toy stores? Sorry, I've utterly missed the joke.  



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 22 - 61
Joy
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 7:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Sanj,

Young children all seem carefree when they play and the world is full of wonder.  They laugh easily and often.  That to me is the "inner child" in all of us that gets lost along the way.  They seem to learn easily.  We all grow up.

Just let it go.   The more it is analyzed the more confusing it will become.

I'm going to get the game.  So there.  

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 23 - 61
san j
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 7:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Sorry your child got "lost along the way"; have fun at the toy store!


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 24 - 61
Jacquie
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 9:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior
Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 97
Gender: Female
Location: New Jersey
Age: 26
Quoted from Joy
Jacquie,

In one sentence you summed it up!  

I was putting you on a bit, Sanj, but one thing about kids when they are young they "play" unconditionally.  

As we all grow older we are conditioned.  Sometimes, as is my case, I'm trying to become aware of "unlearning" some of the things I learned.

Joy


My husband and I still buy games and others toys. I still buy barbies and play-doh etc. sometimes. He just bought a Lego spaceship yesterday. He's 30. I'm 24. I know a good amount of older people too who also play computer games.  There's really nothing to be ashamed about Sounds like you're long over due to embrace your inner child
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 25 - 61
ABJoe
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 10:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

35% Nomad or Teacher - health history dependent
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,305
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
There is a Set puzzle of the day online here:
http://www.setgame.com/puzzle/set.htm

They are quite fun.


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
Logged Online
Private Message Private message Reply: 26 - 61
Joy
Sunday, January 20, 2013, 10:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
ABJoe,

My inner child did have fun.  Thanks.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 27 - 61
Joy
Monday, January 21, 2013, 12:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Jacquie,

It sounds like you and your husband are in the "inner child zone" and that's great.  When the world becomes "too much" it's fun to just be able to focus on shapes, colors, and things that remind us of times when the world was right in front of us and we were creating.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 28 - 61
Jacquie
Monday, January 21, 2013, 1:22am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Warrior
Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 97
Gender: Female
Location: New Jersey
Age: 26
Quoted from Joy
Jacquie,

It sounds like you and your husband are in the "inner child zone" and that's great.  When the world becomes "too much" it's fun to just be able to focus on shapes, colors, and things that remind us of times when the world was right in front of us and we were creating.

Joy


You got that right! No reason it should ever have to end
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 29 - 61
Amazone I.
Monday, January 21, 2013, 10:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+ GT 4...E/..INTJ ....prop.=non-taster..
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 16,380
Gender: Female
Location: CH-Benglen Kanton Z�rich
Age: 57
life itself is nothing but a game ....


MIfHI K-174
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 30 - 61
san j
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 12:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Amazone I.
life itself is nothing but a game ....

Simply to live is to keep one's brain cells firing - sure! As for "nothing but"?



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 31 - 61
san j
Thursday, July 18, 2013, 6:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from ABJoe
There is a Set puzzle of the day online here:
http://www.setgame.com/puzzle/set.htm

They are quite fun.

Tried this, but the instructions were in gibberish/code, as sometimes happens. Is there a place to learn how to play?

I've  been learning Sudoku over the past couple of weeks. At first I played on paper and found it stretching the grey matter.
Then I discovered it on websites where it has the potential to become a sort of hand-eye coordination screen-game, rather than the logic exercise I get every time on the page.
Also: More intense attention is required on paper.

So: I'm gradually learning which "options" I want to use onscreen, but I think I prefer to play all of these games the old fashioned way. A function of age, I think?

I've also just added two new languages to my reading program.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 32 - 61
yaeli
Thursday, July 18, 2013, 7:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
I am doing Lumosity for the third year. Games for all seasons. Some are smart.


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 33 - 61
Adopted4
Thursday, July 18, 2013, 12:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 377
Gender: Female
Location: Southern MD
Age: 46
I purchased a set of 6 activity books from dyslexiagames.com for my dyslexic type O daughter. Although it is targeted for children with learning disabilities it is also fun and stimulating for my older daughter. There are 2 versions; I purchased the first version for early to mid-elementary school aged children but I think the second version is for preteen, teens, and adults with more significant learning disabilities.

The science behind the creation of the books is pretty compelling. It is actually recommended to begin a learning session with one or two of these "brain game" activities because it stimulates the dendrites of the brain which "wakes up" the brain before moving on to an activity that requires deep thought or concentration.

My daughter loves the activities. Even though most people here on the forums wouldn't need these kind of games for themselves, they would make great gifts for kids and young teens (version 2) that enjoy art and intellectual stimulation.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 34 - 61
ABJoe
Thursday, July 18, 2013, 11:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

35% Nomad or Teacher - health history dependent
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,305
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
Quoted from san j
Tried this, but the instructions were in gibberish/code, as sometimes happens. Is there a place to learn how to play?

Did you see this instruction page for the Setgame?
http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/instructions/SET%20INSTRUCTIONS%20-%20ENGLISH.pdf


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
Logged Online
Private Message Private message Reply: 35 - 61
Joy
Friday, July 19, 2013, 2:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
ABJoe,

I start most days by playing the "set game".  It might be for kids and probably they have quicker reactions than mine but I find it helps me with color, visual perception, and function.  I feel more alert after playing this game.  

Thanks, Joe, for mentioning this once again.  

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 36 - 61
san j
Friday, July 19, 2013, 3:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from ABJoe


No. I clicked on "learn to play" at the page linked to, and got gibberish here:
http://23.23.253.39/sites/default/files/tutorials/tutorial/SetTutorial.swf
or here:
http://www.setgame.com/sites/default/files/tutorials/tutorial/SetTutorial.swf


I don't know what I was supposed to click on at the SET website to arrive at the URL you provide, especially with the two "%20" numbers in it.  

I just started winging/ guessing, however - it doesn't look all that interesting to me.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 37 - 61
yaeli
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
I've just tried for the first time the Setgame tutorial and game, it worked and it's fun!  

During the workout it was a bit annoying and worrisome: where are my brains already?   It's very much about attention  


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 38 - 61
yaeli
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
About the game of life, it reminds me of the scene when Adam and wife, after eating from the forbidden fruit, realizing that they were nude, and sewing themselves girdles, hid in the trees in the Garden of Eden.

God participated and called: "Adam, where art thou?"  

Genesis 3, 9.



Revision History (1 edits)
yaeli  -  Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:39am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 39 - 61
san j
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from yaeli
I've just tried for the first time the Setgame tutorial and game, it worked and it's fun!  

During the workout it was a bit annoying and worrisome: where are my brains already?   It's very much about attention  


All of the puzzles are about attention, no?
A "Near Impossible" or "Diabolical" Sudoku is also demanding of intense attention.
An Acrostic demands the same.
A Diagramless Crossword Puzzle, and on and on.

I don't know about other B's but I am someone who can apply my attention to one task for amounts of time others find amazing if not harrowing. I might not seem to come up for air (i.e., eat, go to the bathroom) -- nearly undistractible. Does anyone relate to that?  

The same with Research - When I want to understand something, I go to great --nay, phenomenal-- lengths to do so. Hours at a time, years of reading/ studying/ questioning, if necessary.

I wonder where that trait figures in the Plasticity scheme...

People I've known with Attention deficits, if you will, have tended to be people whose minds are prone to wander and who find it very difficult to focus.
Granted, I haven't studied the phenomenon of "attention" itself, in all my attending(s)!


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 40 - 61
yaeli
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
Quoted from san j
All of the puzzles are about attention, no?
Sure!!! inter alia....

Sudoku demands your unmost attention - it's a swell coaching!




Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 41 - 61
yaeli
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
Lack of attention is the world's great hindrance.

I was thinking this morning, BTD's principle has been sitting there before humanity's eyes, and almost nobody had paid attention to it, until Drs. D'Adamo came and rescued us.


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 42 - 61
ABJoe
Friday, July 19, 2013, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

35% Nomad or Teacher - health history dependent
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,305
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
Quoted from ABJoe
There is a Set puzzle of the day online here:
http://www.setgame.com/puzzle/set.htm

Due to a site update, this URL is no longer working...

The new URL is:
http://www.setgame.com/set/daily_puzzle

The tutorial link from that page worked for me...  Although it is an animated tutorial, rather than just the instruction sheet from the link I posted earlier...


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
Logged Online
Private Message Private message Reply: 43 - 61
SquarePeg
Friday, July 19, 2013, 5:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,488
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
Update....

I signed up for a free account on Lumosity, plus, I added the KenKen and KaKuro games to my tablet.

Various Replies...

The characters "%20" in a URL stand for a space character.  Older browsers did not tolerate spaces in the URLs.

When I played the Sudoku in the newspaper, I'd frequently reach a point that was an impossible solution, where two of the same numbers had to be in the same row, column or 3x3 box.  Now that I play on my tablet, that doesn't happen anymore.  The app prevents me from entering two of the same numbers where ever I shouldn't.  BTW, the first app I played was faulty after an update and offered puzzles that were impossible to complete.


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 44 - 61
Jane
Friday, July 19, 2013, 6:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,721
Gender: Female
Location: Metrowest Boston, MA
Age: 70
I was really into Sudoku for a while, years ago when my father was in the hospital it was a great way to pass the time just sitting there.  I still do the ones in the Boston Globe on occasion but sometimes they just take too much time.  I LOVE the Kenken puzzles.  The ones at the beginning of the week are too easy (the 4x4s) but the 6x6s are more challenging and don't take forever to figure out.  I love hard crosswords - the kind where even if you don't know the answers, persistence will eventually get you there. You might get a couple of letters wrong if the clues in both directions are complete unknowns but usually I can finish them.
Yesterday I could really see their value.  I was exhausted....had only 3 hours sleep the night before then all day at work.  Things I knew that I knew were just weren't coming to me but I kept working the puzzle and eventually finished all three - kenken, crossword and sudoku in the Boston Globe.  
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 45 - 61
RedLilac
Saturday, July 20, 2013, 1:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI tweaked Explorer Super Taster from Illinois
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,052
Gender: Female
Location: Lombard, Illinois (Chicago suburb)
Age: 63
I used to do Luminosity but I had to pay for it.

I do free games on my IPad & IPhone:  Clockwork Brain, CyrptoQuip, Mahjong, LogiGrid, WordSlide, Reversi, Spider, etc


I am B- NON-Sec Explorer; my son is B+ SEC Nomad; my Mother was O+; and my Father was AB-
SWAMI Thanksgiving present 2008
Revised from Arlene B- NonSec to RedLilac on 3/31/06
Logged Online
Private Message Private message Reply: 46 - 61
yaeli
Sunday, July 21, 2013, 5:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
Quoted from san j
All of the puzzles are about attention, no?
This is fabulous in the book of Jeremiah, my fave prophet since early teenage. This unforgettable formula - God's question to Jeremiah, which is also repeated further in the book - appears right in the first chapter: "What do you see Jeremiah?" This key question calls for the prophet's attention and makes him realize that the simple, everyday, trivial phenomenon he has just noticed has also a more deep/significant meaning.

We use this formula every now and then in daily life, when questing an opinon of somebody who is more capable than ourselves and evidently sees farther and deeper then us.




Revision History (2 edits)
yaeli  -  Sunday, July 21, 2013, 6:47am
yaeli  -  Sunday, July 21, 2013, 6:45am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 47 - 61
san j
Thursday, July 25, 2013, 6:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Adopted4
I purchased a set of 6 activity books from dyslexiagames.com for my dyslexic type O daughter. Although it is targeted for children with learning disabilities it is also fun and stimulating for my older daughter. There are 2 versions; I purchased the first version for early to mid-elementary school aged children but I think the second version is for preteen, teens, and adults with more significant learning disabilities.

The science behind the creation of the books is pretty compelling. It is actually recommended to begin a learning session with one or two of these "brain game" activities because it stimulates the dendrites of the brain which "wakes up" the brain before moving on to an activity that requires deep thought or concentration.

My daughter loves the activities. Even though most people here on the forums wouldn't need these kind of games for themselves, they would make great gifts for kids and young teens (version 2) that enjoy art and intellectual stimulation.


There are Brain-Game books for the development of different categories of intelligence. I was surfing Amazon and found a few. Neurologists write that deficits/weaknesses in particular brain-regions or types of intelligence can be therapeutically addressed, to an extent, using cognitive exercises carefully prescribed/ chosen.
Interesting.
So it's more than just fun.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 48 - 61
Spring
Thursday, July 25, 2013, 12:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Explorer
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,406
Gender: Female
Location: Southeastern USA
Quoted from Joy
None of the above are feasible.  Oh well, I am so obsessed with keeping my creativity active that I might just boldly go in the store and buy the game, anyway. Joy  

People are always buying gifts for children. On the other hand, being me, I would probably go in there and tell them that I had heard good things about the game and wanted to try it for myself!!   Reminds me of the time a good friend and her husband brought our seventeen year old son a coloring book and crayons while he was in the hospital. Her husband nearly had a cow that she had bought him such a thing, but, guess what, he LOVED it! There were all kinds of other things for him to read, play, etc., but he enjoyed coloring in that book! In fact, I think it is still in his things here at our house!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 49 - 61
Enobattar
Thursday, July 25, 2013, 1:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher, INTJ, Taster, Rh +, age 60
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 389
Gender: Female
Location: South Central PA
Age: 61
San j, I got hooked on Sudoku several years ago and quickly moved on up past the Easy and Mediums to the Hard and Challenger ones.  Even more brain stretches when attempting Kakuro and Sumoku (spelling on both?  Very entertaining for my love of numbers.

Also, has anyone read/heard of how playing any musical instrument while reading the music.... self teaching out of those "How To Play ______" books, etc. is supposed to be VERY helpful to our brains?  I read that a little while ago and ever since my guitar and banjo have been calling to me out of their dusty corners.  


Romans 5:1-11  

BTD since 1997, GTD since 2007, SWAMI since 2011, Compliant since 3/13   Husband A+ sec.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 50 - 61
SquarePeg
Friday, July 26, 2013, 1:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI GT4 Explorer 44%; Rh-; iNfP; nonnie?
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,488
Gender: Male
Location: Northeast, USA
Quoted from san j
There are Brain-Game books for the development of different categories of intelligence. I was surfing Amazon and found a few. Neurologists write that deficits/weaknesses in particular brain-regions or types of intelligence can be therapeutically addressed, to an extent, using cognitive exercises carefully prescribed/ chosen.
Interesting.
So it's more than just fun.  
Do you know of anything specifically designed to improve inferencing?


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 51 - 61
Marc121
Friday, July 26, 2013, 5:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 409
Gender: Male
Location: Phillipines
Age: 21
Lumosity kindly recommend to everyone to try the trial version. Its fun.


What has surprised me? What has touched me? What has inspired me?  
              
We are closer than we think   , keep pushing                                     

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Windows Live Messenger WLM Reply: 52 - 61
Averno
Friday, July 26, 2013, 10:57am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,147
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland
Quoted from Enobattar

Also, has anyone read/heard of how playing any musical instrument while reading the music.... self teaching out of those "How To Play ______" books, etc. is supposed to be VERY helpful to our brains?  I read that a little while ago and ever since my guitar and banjo have been calling to me out of their dusty corners.  


Years ago, I read a study suggesting that right-left hemisphere "crosstalk connections" were more developed in musicians. Not sure whether it implied a predisposition was present, or that it was a matter of training and development. I will say, that as a musician and an artist, my best creative experiences happen when the analytical left and intuitive right hemispheres are balanced-- meaning neither in dominance. The result is (or used to be) simply called "flow". A nearly trance-like state that musicians particularly recognize as the "instrument playing the musician". Personally, I believe this occurs because both hemispheres are operating at once and in unison. A full awakening of the 6th and 7th Chakras... very powerful.

  
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 53 - 61
Marc121
Saturday, July 27, 2013, 3:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 409
Gender: Male
Location: Phillipines
Age: 21
ALso tonybuzzans book improve my memory. It improved me on memorizing things thanks to his book(Master Your Memory Mindset). Its really nice.


What has surprised me? What has touched me? What has inspired me?  
              
We are closer than we think   , keep pushing                                     


Revision History (1 edits)
Marc121  -  Saturday, July 27, 2013, 3:28pm
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Windows Live Messenger WLM Reply: 54 - 61
yaeli
Saturday, July 27, 2013, 4:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
Quoted from Averno
Years ago, I read a study suggesting that right-left hemisphere "crosstalk connections" were more developed in musicians. Not sure whether it implied a predisposition was present, or that it was a matter of training and development.
Unlike other crafts that demand cooperation and coordination of the right hand and the left hand in performing regularly repeated movements, playing a musical instrument requires the two hands to practice and perform in coordination and harmony, within a relatively short span of time, multitudes of different jobs, which (a) keep changing in real time, (b) must comply with numerous given factors, as tempo, dynamics, character of the music and so on, let alone playing with other people in some consort.

This level of complexity of right and left hands working together necessarily challenges the two hemispheres to work in harmony as well.

Now I am not sure anymore if I said anything....


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 55 - 61
yaeli
Sunday, July 28, 2013, 7:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66
Quoted from Averno
A nearly trance-like state that musicians particularly recognize as the "instrument playing the musician". Personally, I believe this occurs because both hemispheres are operating at once and in unison. A full awakening of the 6th and 7th Chakras... very powerful.
An exalted, sublime experience that also catches with the enchanted audience...

Does it also alter brain wavelengths? Probably...

In any case, the extent to which a musical instrument may resonate with the performer's body is most amazing and may yield unbelievable experiences, hopefully on a regular basis.    


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 56 - 61
Averno
Sunday, July 28, 2013, 12:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,147
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland
Quoted from yaeli
An exalted, sublime experience that also catches with the enchanted audience...

Does it also alter brain wavelengths? Probably...

In any case, the extent to which a musical instrument may resonate with the performer's body is most amazing and may yield unbelievable experiences, hopefully on a regular basis.    


Well said, Yaeli  

For me, It did progress-- from fleeting as a young student, to near consistency at a higher level as a professional. I'm sure it's limitless, though I can't imagine being any more "out of body" than what I'd experienced towards the end of my career.

Often, it had to be teased out... "negotiated" due to nervousness or fatigue. I could usually work through it drawing on the energies of other musicians or even the audience if there was a truly participatory vibe. And while being on that wavelength was euphoric and energizing, absent it was truly exhausting. Having been there, it's easy to detect when musicians are forcing their reach.

I know this conversation is somewhat of a departure from the thread, but I think cerebral plasticity means much more than deep concentration or focused attention. Exercises, puzzles, problem solving, human potential...  all engage expansive broadening of awareness and processing.


Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 57 - 61
Enobattar
Sunday, July 28, 2013, 1:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher, INTJ, Taster, Rh +, age 60
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 389
Gender: Female
Location: South Central PA
Age: 61
Quoted from yaeli
Unlike other crafts that demand cooperation and coordination of the right hand and the left hand in performing regularly repeated movements, playing a musical instrument requires the two hands to practice and perform in coordination and harmony, within a relatively short span of time, multitudes of different jobs, which (a) keep changing in real time, (b) must comply with numerous given factors, as tempo, dynamics, character of the music and so on, let alone playing with other people in some consort.

This level of complexity of right and left hands working together necessarily challenges the two hemispheres to work in harmony as well.

Now I am not sure anymore if I said anything....


Makes sense to me, Yaeli.  


Romans 5:1-11  

BTD since 1997, GTD since 2007, SWAMI since 2011, Compliant since 3/13   Husband A+ sec.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 58 - 61
yaeli
Sunday, July 28, 2013, 6:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Gatherer / Taster / ISFJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,552
Gender: Female
Location: Yerushalayim, Israel
Age: 66


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 59 - 61
san j
Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 7:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
I was watching Chopped and Master Chef, and I thought: An exercise of yet other neurons.

As a chef, standing at one's station day after day demands graceful mobility within one's mental pantry, and a thorough facility with flavors and combinations, textures, colors, cooking methods and times, etc.
These TV programs remind me how rapid one's recall needs to be, especially in a professional context, but similarly in a lower-stakes home kitchen.
Cooks, drawing on this fluency of multiple sense knowledge, are exercising far more "cerebral plasticity" than we/you/they realize, especially if they keep educating themselves into old age, learning new techniques, flavor profiles, and whole cuisines.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 60 - 61
san j
Sunday, August 4, 2013, 9:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,443
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Re: Sudoku:

Sudoku is many different sorts of puzzle, I've found.
First of all, it varies by medium: If you use a computer screen, it's a different game from one you'd play with paper and pen/pencil.
Secondly, the features/ "options" vary on different sites'/programs' boards, so you play differently according to those available, and/or whether or not you use a scratch pad in addition.
Thirdly, you can use a smorgasbord of methods of solution - even on paper.

I find that it comes together for an excellent workout only if I do it on paper.
This is where I discover new avenues to to the answers and, furthermore, discern my own means and flaws, and eradicate them by applying various disciplines.

And I can really feel the kinks being massaged-out by thinking differently.

I had been bored with Sudoku, but I intuited that there were hidden deeper levels to the humble puzzle, and I'm finding them.
If you have such intuitions about it or some other puzzle, try trusting that, using paper and pen/pencil, and following different paths to the same destination. It feels good to make it more difficult and then figure it out.
A little novelty makes a rut a therapeutic challenge.
Like everything else - Make it interesting.  

Another such tweak is: Foreign languages - if anyone else here is multilingual:
Learn another accent or dialect of a foreign language.
Read aloud in Castilian rather than Latin American Spanish, for instance.
Study Canadian French.
Affect the accent or brogue of another region of the UK or US...or parts DownUnder.
Figure out what the heck Shakespeare is saying!
Fun, fun, fun...


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 61 - 61
3 Pages 1 2 3 All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  Cerebral Plasticity: Brain Exercise: Puzzles, etc.

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread