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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  How to help 15yo Type O  "tune in" to the world?
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How to help 15yo Type O  "tune in" to the world?  This thread currently has 2,050 views. Print Print Thread
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 7:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I've been having some issues with my 15yo daughter. She's type O negative and I strongly suspect she's an Explorer.

She had ADD symptoms as a young child, helped greatly by The  Feingold Program (avoiding artificial colors and flavors) and helped even more by avoiding wheat.

She had some sleep issues for the past year, but those mostly cleared up when she started taking methyl B-12. The sleep issues return when she "forgets" to take the pills. Like the past few weeks.

I've had her on the type O diet for about 2 years, but I'm not sure how compliant she is away from home, and she's a very picky eater. If the taste or texture is "off" she simply won't  eat it. She does eat plenty of apples, sweet potatoes, veggie soup (I try to get as much nutrition into these soups as possible, as she doesn't eat too many vegetables otherwise.) She won't eat salad, will occasionally eat broccolli or green beans (only if cooked "just right") and does eat broccolli quiche for breakfast sometimes. She doesn't consistnely take any vitamins, though I'm trying to get her to take a multivitamin (one that Dr Henninger approved for DD1.) She could also stand to lose about 15 lbs,  but that's not my top priority right now.

When she doesn't like the taste or texture of a food, she'll stop eating. When her blood sugar gets too low, she completely spaces out. She drinks a lot of apple juice in the mornings when she's  too tired to  eat. She also eats a LOT of chocolate chips, often to the exclusion of more balanced foods. I'm hesitant to stop buying the chips, because I've run out in the past and she's ended up simply not eating enough and being even less focused  than usual. Lately she's also had issues with mild reflux, usually after drinking too much fluid at once, and sometimes she'll vomit a small amount when she tries to swallow pills.

She's also showing signs of fighting off a virus right now. She "felt feverish" this morning (though I didn't actually take her temperature) and had some ear pain. She was tired and "spaced out" yesterday, and I just found out that she's been "spaced out" in chemistry class as well (and presumably other classes too,  but only the science teacher called me.)

There are a lot of behavioral concerns I have with her, which I will address with her, but my gut feeling is that there's something unbalanced in her body chemistry at the root of her behavioral problems. Why is it so hard for her to focus on assigned tasks? Why can't she remember to do her homework or her household chores without numerous reminders? Why does she keep getting sick?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Jane
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Have to admit to feeling spaced out myself.....I had some dental surgery last week and my sinuses are a mess.  Been using the Neilmed thingy which is like a squeezable neti pot but the headaches make it hard to concentrate.  Not sure if it's from the surgery or from the mold from the leaves finally starting to fall.  There are a lot of people complaining of similar symptoms, Ruthie.  It's hard to concentrate when you have a wicked sinus headache.
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yeah, I'm trying to be sensitive to her needs becase I've been very "unfocused" lately too. I've got some kale chips in the oven right now, even though I'd intended to make them around 10:00 AM!!!

But there still must be some way to help her. Some food to emphasize or eliminate? Would chewable vitamins (with type O avoids) be a better choice than "not taking vitamins" when she's sick?

She's napping right now, but I need to wake her shortly so she can do her homework before dinner. I mentioned earlier that she's fighting a virus right now, and her response was "I think the virus is winning."


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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jayneeo
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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If I were you, I would get rid of the chocolate chips and replace with dried cherries or...? if she sometimes needs a sweet....(better not to, but she's a kid)
there's a tea that might fill the bill: double dark chocolate mate' by republic of tea.....mate' gives a gentle lift...
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Jane
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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I like the double dark choc. mate too but too much of it gives me palpatations.  
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The options for unadulterated dried fruits are pretty slim. I have yet to find dried cherries that don't also have sugar, sunflower oil,and/or sulfates added. Plus, dried fruit is practically fat-free, and is metabolized like pure sugar. The choclate chips at least have a decent amount of fat in them. I do have raisins in the house, but she  doesn't really like them.

She resisted efforts to wake her up. I told her, very calmly, that by choosing to stay in bed, she's choosing to stay home tonight (and not go to the youth group meeting.) I'll do my best to remind her of that tonight without any anger in my voice "You're sick, you still have homework to do, you need to stay home tonight." rather than "I TOLD YOU TO DO YOUR HOMEWORK EARLIER!!!! YOU'RE GOING NOWHERE, YOUNG LADY!!!! Wish me luck talking to her later!


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Jane
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Is it possible that the chocolate chips could be contributing to the sleep issues, Ruthie.  
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honeybee
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I love the title of this post! Your children are very lucky to have such an aware parent. Goodluck  
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Sahara
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 9:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Maybe it's time to measure and troubleshoot the problem.  Will she eat protein?  That would be my first guess.  I would take the chips away     and replace them with snacks only from the genotype list.  
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 10:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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It's definitely possible, but I'm not sure how to get her to eat healthier  foods. I don't want to just stop buying chocolate chips because I've tried that in the past and it didn't work- she whined about being hungry, snacked on handfuls of brown sugar, and/or zoned out even worse than usual.

I need to convince her to cut back on chocolate consumption all by herself and help her make better choices. She's too big for me to micro-manage her diet. Heck, I didn't even micro-manage her diet when she was 8 months old. Numerous times, her 2yo sister handed her some snack from the other seat in the double stroller, something that I'd intended to introduce after 12 months old.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Victoria
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 11:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sugar isn't helping at all .. but I see the dilemma you are in.

Maybe give Clematis (Bach) a try.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Sahara
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 11:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Victoria
Sugar isn't helping at all .. but I see the dilemma you are in.

Maybe give Clematis (Bach) a try.  


Yes maybe try some essences.

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Jane
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 11:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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I can identify with the chocolate thing.  I think when I quit the coffee I craved the chocolate even more.
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Sahara
Wednesday, November 9, 2011, 11:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Well just using the blood type O list why not have her snack on beefy jerky, pumpkin seeds, figs, sliced banana, brown rice crackers with goat cheese, almond butter ezekiel toast, rice milk etc.
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deblynn3
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 12:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ruthie we love your oatmeal cookies. I use 2cups of quinoa flour (because of it's protein)  and top with 1 large chocolate chip, I use honey, or molasses. My daughter take three to work, if she can't get a break and feels her blood sugar starting to drop she eats one. This a been really been a lifesaver for her. We like them for breakfast and two will keep me going all morning. (not bad for a gatherer)  Would this work for her?  

The only way I can remember to take my B12 (s) at night to to use one of those weekly pill boxes and put it on my bed stand so I'll see it. I keep a closed water cup there so I can take them without ever leaving bed.  


Swami, 100% me..
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ruthiegirl
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 12:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I pack her cookies to eat in school; she doesn't usually want any more afterwards. Some days she eats quiche before school, other days just juice. Then she has some veggie/bean soup for lunch after school (she doesn't have a lunch period this year.) Sometimes another meal/snack after the soup and before family dinner, but not always.

I know sugar isn't helping her at all, but I can't "do this" for her.

At this point, she's most definitely sick. I made pizza for dinner, she had only one (usually she has 2 or 3 personal pizzas) and then threw up half of it. After her tummy settled, she had some more soup and that stayed down.

So the immediate issue is to get her through this illness, but the long-term goal is still to optimize her health. Part of her "forgetting the rest of the world exists" seems to come when she's fighting off an illness- even when she doesn't fully get sick, she often feels like she's going to, but manages to sleep it off. In the meantime, she's ignoring the world around her. She needs to learn how to tune in to the world around her even when she's feeling tired, and  it takes more energy to do so. So, something to help her focus her mind, plus something to keep her healthy.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Jane
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 12:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hang in there Ruthie.  I think you do an awesome job with your kids.  It's SO hard when they are sick.
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KimonoKat
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 1:13am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My guess for her mental clarity, she needs physical exercise.  You have a difficult road Ruthie.   I can only imagine how difficult it must be since I don't have children.


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.
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Sahara
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 2:13am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I started exercising when I was about her age, it helped me a lot.  Will she eat vegetables with butter?  She needs cholesterol to think more clearly... well that is what I would give my Hunter child, if I had one.  Have you guesstimated a genotype?  You said Explorer.

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DoS
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 2:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Zinc, and then pumpkin seeds after some zinc supplementation for a snack from now on. That is for the ADD. Also Parmesan cheese, she must have bacterial issues for the low immunity. The sugar is a huge problem. It seems many people with bad gut flora get picky on food. Does she like bananas? They would help balance her and keep blood sugar from dropping too much. She sounds very sensitive to wheat, like more of a problem than just being Blood Type O. When you are very sensitive it does serious damage to gut flora.

She needs exercise. If you read this you will immediately recognize the correlations. Hunter
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TJ
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 2:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
In the meantime, she's ignoring the world around her. She needs to learn how to tune in to the world around her even when she's feeling tired, and  it takes more energy to do so.
Let me know if you come up with something that works.  I struggle with the same thing.  I think some people (like me) will push themselves right up to the edge of their capability on a regular basis, and to make matters worse, won't sit still for long enough to fully recover.  As soon as we are "well enough", we're right back out there, full steam ahead, until we start falling apart again.  That sort of cycle keeps you from being at your best, even when you are at your "best", if you follow me.

It's like building a wooden chair and sitting down in it before the glue has finished drying.  It will hold you up, but the weight is going to separate the joints.  At some point you will have to take it apart, re-glue it, and let it sit long enough for the glue to dry, if you want it to be sturdy.
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geminisue
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 3:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Is she a diabetic?  Has she been checked?
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Momotaro
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 3:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'll tell you what really helped pull my son out of his downward trend.  There is a book by Judy Converse called, "Special-Needs Kids Eat Right."  She also does counseling for children up to age (I think) 21.  She also has a website, nutritioncare.net.

The most primary thing she emphasizes is to check the child's nutritional status first, make sure the child is getting enough calories.  She has a 7 step treatment to follow in the correct order.  And the first step is so important -- and so important to do FIRST -- that she highly emphasizes it.  Without checking this first and addressing it, in her experience, all other interventions don't go as well.  (I found this to be the case for my son, that he needed more calories since everything else I was trying wasn't working.)  Many people do not realize the importance of the first step.

The first 4 steps out of the 7 steps are:
1.  Check the nutrition status.  Is the child getting enough calories?
2.  Fix the gut bugs.  Candida?  Probiotics...
3.  Remove foods not tolerated.  Replace with more nutritional foods (or at least equal value).
4.  Micronutrients (which ones, and dosage amounts, depends on the signs/symptoms)

I think step 5, 6, and 7 are if things aren't working still after some time passes.  So I only remember off the top of my head the first 4.

Anyway, so if she eats apples, sweet potato, and veggie soup, if it were me, I would try to fill her up with foods like these to make sure her calorie requirements are met, and then all other diet/nutritional interventions are more likely to succeed.

I wish I could still do the counseling with her, but it was too expensive to continue.  However, I find the book to be so very helpful.
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Sahara
Thursday, November 10, 2011, 4:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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My mom said she was raised to eat what was put in front of her.  My dad, a Virgo like me, got in to "health food" and gourmet cooking when I was a teen.  I think both parents may be Hunters.  Dad has digestive problems and is athletic and both have the "personality". My parents were strict well my dad was more than my mom but no one knew anything about what to eat back then so no one could set any kind of real rules.  

I don't have my own children but I would combine my parents views though I remember as a teen I ate sporadically    and still have issues but actually also had a chocolate chip type phase that preceded the aerobics dance phase.  I think genotype will help a lot.  You can control her snacks to some extent or maybe set a rule of one healthy nutritious snack then send to room to study before dinner.
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ruthiegirl
Friday, November 11, 2011, 2:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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OK, so if step one is "make sure the child has enough calories" then I'm even more hesitant to cut out the chocolate chips! She does seem pretty intuitive about which foods do and don't agree with her. She craves apples, which are an Explorer superfood. She doesn't seem to like any nuts or seeds. She does eat plenty of meat- not too much at one time, but she never feels satisfied if we don't have meat so we have it almost every day, and plenty of cheese and/or fish on other days. I make sure to always have healthy "real food" available to her- veggie soups,  broccolli quiche, and cookies she can take with her to school.

Momotaro- I just reserved that book you suggested, even though it's labeled as a book to help kids with autism- is ADD considered part of the spectrum?

Geminisue- she's not showing any other signs of diabetes, and her pediatrician knows about the diabetes in the family. I think she  gets the A1C blood test every 2-3 years.

DOS- I would be very surprised if she turned out to be a Hunter. She's about 4'10" tall and 130 lbs, wearing a woman's size 6-8. All her height is in her torso- when sitting down, she doesn't look so short. Even without actually measuring her, I can tell you her torso is longer than her legs. Besides, looking at her food preferences and aversions, she seems to fit the Explorer diet more than the Hunter or Gatherer diet.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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DoS
Friday, November 11, 2011, 5:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
OK, so if step one is "make sure the child has enough calories" then I'm even more hesitant to cut out the chocolate chips! She does seem pretty intuitive about which foods do and don't agree with her. She craves apples, which are an Explorer superfood. She doesn't seem to like any nuts or seeds. She does eat plenty of meat- not too much at one time, but she never feels satisfied if we don't have meat so we have it almost every day, and plenty of cheese and/or fish on other days. I make sure to always have healthy "real food" available to her- veggie soups,  broccolli quiche, and cookies she can take with her to school.

Momotaro- I just reserved that book you suggested, even though it's labeled as a book to help kids with autism- is ADD considered part of the spectrum?

Geminisue- she's not showing any other signs of diabetes, and her pediatrician knows about the diabetes in the family. I think she  gets the A1C blood test every 2-3 years.

DOS- I would be very surprised if she turned out to be a Hunter. She's about 4'10" tall and 130 lbs, wearing a woman's size 6-8. All her height is in her torso- when sitting down, she doesn't look so short. Even without actually measuring her, I can tell you her torso is longer than her legs. Besides, looking at her food preferences and aversions, she seems to fit the Explorer diet more than the Hunter or Gatherer diet.


I disagree with most hunters have longer legs. That might be true with patients Dr. D sees because of better meat quality throughout history, but today good luck finding them in high frequency (if really any) in the younger generations. People my age with longer legs than torso almost don't exists.

However Explorer would be just as likely with issues. The description of eating habits however very much so are what the Hunter profile talks about. You would know nearly right away by checking D24 ratio. If I am not mistaken no women without both D4's are never Hunters - at least without swami or something you won't get it.
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PCUK-Positive
Friday, November 11, 2011, 1:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I would keep her away from the apples,

If funds are tight i would get her on a multi mineral rather than a multi vitamin.

I know it's easier for me as Emily is much younger but she is going to have to start eating the right foods and being less picky (easier said than done, but be creative) step it up a few notches.

i highly recommend trying a teaspoon of flax oil in the mornings, perhaps give her choices a salad (with olive oil pesto of some sort or a teaspoon of flax oil) either way is better than nothing although the flax oil was a game changer for Emily.

as far as the apple juice in the morning is concerned - that's pure fructose - and i would up the anti and get it to terrorist mode- no cookies, no juice would be bought in fact that is exactly what I'm doing for myself now.

it will be tough for a few weeks no doubt but i challenge you to bot buy any juice, only buy compliant fruit like plums, banana, and only a few of each.

We went through a really tough week once when Emily wouldn;t eat anything green at all, we said that it she didn't eat it she couldn;t be hungry and that she wold get nothing else - sounds cruel, but it was true, now we never have a problem. i imagine at 15 you are goon to have your work cut out for you but that is the only way to get this corrected, it is Now or every other months for ever. you decide which darling. peace and love

I keep saying that you are going to have to get her into a good sleeping habit, so naps are not so good.

the virus will go if she get less sugar whether from sweets or wheat or apple juice.

So to conclude Stop buying cookies, and juice, just make compliant food, make pizza only when you are all well, (what flour is it make of - regardless it is high in sugar)






Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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Sahara
Friday, November 11, 2011, 5:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from DoS


I disagree with most hunters have longer legs. That might be true with patients Dr. D sees because of better meat quality throughout history, but today good luck finding them in high frequency (if really any) in the younger generations. People my age with longer legs than torso almost don't exists.

However Explorer would be just as likely with issues. The description of eating habits however very much so are what the Hunter profile talks about. You would know nearly right away by checking D24 ratio. If I am not mistaken no women without both D4's are never Hunters - at least without swami or something you won't get it.


I actually have longer legs than my torso; I'm also very short.  This is going off topic though.

Ruthie, if you think she's an Explorer and she likes apples, how about an apple with goat cheese and pecans.  All I can think is how demineralizing the chocolate chips may be.  Can Explorers have chocolate?
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SquarePeg
Friday, November 11, 2011, 6:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Explorers can have chocolate and whey protein IIRC.  But my SWAMI tells me to avoid most dairy.  I guess it assumes Os to be intolerant of lactose.  So to me, chocolate = cocoa or baker's chocolate.

There are non-dairy chocolate chips.  If the child has issues with dairy products, they might help.  I buy them for my vegan daughter, in fact.


My SWAMI diet is a blend of BTD and GTD Explorer, but I'm not totally compliant.  Also I try to choose foods that have a Low Glycemic index.  DW and DD are A+, probably also Explorer.
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ruthiegirl
Friday, November 11, 2011, 7:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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PC- the cookies aren't bought, they're baked by me from compliant ingredients. Whole spelt flour, eggs, and I can sneak in extra nutrients like ground flax seeds, and I can use honey instead of sugar (though I haven't been doing so lately.) I could call them granola bars if it makes you feel better, but theyr'e less messy when baked as discrete cookies rather than bars.

The chocolate chips are Trader Joe's semi-sweet chocolate chips. Ingredients: cane sugar,chocolate liquor, cocoa  butter, soy lecithin, vanilla extract. They're compliant for Os; my only concern is the quantity of sugar. The pizza is made from whole grain spelt flour. At a typical dinner (when not making pizza) she usually skips the grains entirely and gets her carbs from sweet potatoes.

I can't  "not keep much fruit in the house" when DD1 is supposed to have 3 cups per day on  her SWAMI. And she DOES eat green things; namely broccolli quiche and I put spinach and parsley into the  veggie soups. If I could just get her to eat more

The bottom line is that she's a young adult, not a  big child. I don't have that much control over her, and it would damage our relationship if I tried to micro-manage her diet. I like having  teenagers who can talk to me about anything and everything, and I want to keep it that way.

I need to educate and encourage her to eat better, not force her by intenionally running out of the things she'll actually eat. PC- everything you described is perfectly appropriate when feeding a 4 or 5 year old, which is what you were doing. But it just won't work for a 15yo.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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DoS
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Perhaps all of this has nothing to do with trying to effect her diet. Perhaps what you need to do is just talk with her and explain your side of how it is giving you stress. If she is a young adult maybe she will start to take on some responsibility once she understands the concerns.
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ruthiegirl
Friday, November 11, 2011, 8:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The thing is, though, that there's something "un-balanced" about her physically. She keeps getting thrown off-balance by relatively minor stresses that can't be avoided. I want to figure out what it is that her body is missing, so that I can share that information with her and help her make healthy changes.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Maria Giovanna
Friday, November 11, 2011, 8:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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great resolve Ruthiegirl !


INTJ Italy celiac��
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Sahara
Friday, November 11, 2011, 9:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
The thing is, though, that there's something "un-balanced" about her physically. She keeps getting thrown off-balance by relatively minor stresses that can't be avoided. I want to figure out what it is that her body is missing, so that I can share that information with her and help her make healthy changes.


Can she really tolerate grains?  The Explorer genotype isn't one I get really well.  Does she need to exercise do you think?  I had an about face when I was her age when I started doing aerobics but I'm a Hunter.
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Ee Dan
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
The thing is, though, that there's something "un-balanced" about her physically. She keeps getting thrown off-balance by relatively minor stresses that can't be avoided. I want to figure out what it is that her body is missing, so that I can share that information with her and help her make healthy changes.


Blood sugar can certainly do just that. It can make you irritable. Also liver can do that.

Sugar is not good for her... it is going to be bad for blood sugar and liver. Both of which will be increased by lack of exercise.
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PCUK-Positive
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 1:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer Rh+, NN, (lewis a+ b-) [Duffy Fy(a+b+) ]
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All those foods are fine ruthie darling if she were fine, but she is not fine she needs to black dot all those sugars, sugar in spelt, honey, chocolate, soy.

If she is a non secretor then spelt would be an avoid.

Honey is between 52 and 70 fructose. and an avoid for O nonies

sot leitten is and avoid

vanilla is an avoid.

I wouldn't worry so much about adding more greens so much as reducing sugar.

whilst i appreciate what you said about age and i realise Emily is more controllable, I still think you either have to bite the bullet or just keep having problems for ever there is no in between by the sounds of it. i seems you will just go from one crises to another.

the sleeping habits and health problems are i suspect all to do with the sugar that she gets whilst in the house plus perhaps what ever she gets on top of that whilst out of the house.

I would do this regardless of her age.

if she is ill or sleep all day i would not buy any biscuits, I would not provide piazza exceed as a rewards for sleeping successfully all week and going to college. and i would explain this to her. as a parent i would consider it a given to do this.
i would provide only low sugar fruist for the whole family (obviously if at all possible) and you are right i would not punish the other children for the 15' year olsd health problems but I wouldn't let her get the benefits of them being good or else they would learn a very bad lesson.

And of course i would do all of this up front and fairly and i would be very close if ever there was a crisis for moral support.

You know that too much sugar is bad for the immune system and that some children have sleep issue when over loaded with sugar. you know all this as you are thoughtful enough to advise others of this -

I'm gong to email you a book that may be useful to you , with the best of intention as always


Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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Andrew
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 4:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ruthiegirl:
First of all - a great big pat on the back for all of your efforts with not just DD2 (the subject of this thread), but also for DD1 and SS. Not only are you raising the family single handedly, with a non main stream lifestyle, you also find sufficient time to help the many members of these forums. Thank you.

DD2 is 15. There are many things going on physically, mentally and above all emotionally, as the body develops to attain adulthood. Given her age and present disposition and your preferred household atmosphere, perhaps you are doing all that you can for her, right now.

It may just come down to the old adage about leading a horse to water but one cannot make the horse drink.  

The kids are good. Right? Let us count our blessings and not make this too big of a deal. I have experienced this in my family (3 SS presently aged 23 to 29 - still living at home. The economy will improve. Some day.   )

Keep the communications open. And listen to them! (And no, it is not easy.)

Hugs to you and your family
Andrew


Lefty! Environmental Allergies (Mold, Grasses, Trees, Weeds especially ragweed), Food Intolerance (Gluten and Dairy)
(Y-Chrom R1b1 M343) (Father's mtChrom A)

Exploring a new, epigenetic, frontier - one meal at a time!
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Spazcat
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 5:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Andrew
Ruthiegirl:
First of all - a great big pat on the back for all of your efforts with not just DD2 (the subject of this thread), but also for DD1 and SS. Not only are you raising the family single handedly, with a non main stream lifestyle, you also find sufficient time to help the many members of these forums. Thank you.

DD2 is 15. There are many things going on physically, mentally and above all emotionally, as the body develops to attain adulthood. Given her age and present disposition and your preferred household atmosphere, perhaps you are doing all that you can for her, right now.

It may just come down to the old adage about leading a horse to water but one cannot make the horse drink.  

The kids are good. Right? Let us count our blessings and not make this too big of a deal. I have experienced this in my family (3 SS presently aged 23 to 29 - still living at home. The economy will improve. Some day.   )

Keep the communications open. And listen to them! (And no, it is not easy.)

Hugs to you and your family
Andrew


I agree!  I think you are doing a great job!  Your kids are miles ahead of so many their age wrt health an nutrition, I think you're doing great.  Keep on imparting your knowledge, maybe point out that sugar *may* be an issue for dd2, and perhaps come up with an alternative, maybe some extra-dark chocolate rather than the chips (I am familiar w/those TJ's c chips, they are to die for!)    What you share with her *will* sink in, even if you don't see it now.   Keep on keepin' on and keep the lines of communication open.  You're right, you really can't control everything she eats at this point, you can only set the stage for her future habits and provide the best food for her that you are able.  The rest is up to her.
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Victoria
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 5:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from PCUK-Positive
All those foods are fine ruthie darling if she were fine, but she is not fine she needs to black dot all those sugars, sugar in spelt, honey, chocolate, soy.

If she is a non secretor then spelt would be an avoid.

Honey is between 52 and 70 fructose. and an avoid for O nonies

sot leitten is and avoid

vanilla is an avoid.



Are you saying soy lecithin is an avoid?  It is neutral for blood type O's.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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PCUK-Positive
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 12:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I thought it was an avoid Victoria, i get confused because it looks like the girl is using a combination of explorer and blood type O diet. and she might be a nonnie since her mum is.

Soy lecithin is an avoid for all of us.


Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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EquiPro
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 1:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ruthie, you and I live parallel lives...we must meet when I get to NYC.

My daughter, like yours, is a super-taster (which I'm sure that you've tested) and is EXTREMELY PICKY about her food. What others don't understand about this situation is that you can't just substitute one thing for another, like dried fruit for chocolate chips.  They simply won't put them in their mouth.  If you somehow manage to get them to take a tiny bite, they will usually gag or even throw up.  This isn't manipulation... this is a physical reaction to the taste, smell and sometimes the mouth-feel of food.  My daughter can, easily, differentiate between different brands of the same item, one being eatable to her and the other not.

I'm not sure that there is a solution to this other than letting them grow up to the point where they can work on their food issues themselves.  What I do, in the meantime, is enforce a few basic rules.  They are:

1) animal protein at each meal (3x per day).  I don't care what protein that is or what form it takes, but it has to be eaten FIRST.  Hard-boiled eggs - whites only, thoroughly cleaned (she has to do that part) - are a staple for this.  I count the whites of 1-1/2 eggs as acceptable.

2) at least 1 real serving, each day, of fruit and 1 serving, each day, of veggies.  Since her options on these are extremely limited, it often means carrot (with ranch dressing) and strawberries (she likes them macerated) ever day, day in and day out.  I just deal with it.

I find that she is completely happy to eat the same things, over and over again.  Luckily, she's just as fussy about sweets as she is about everything else.   For instance, she will ONLY drink water or, occasionally, apple juice.  She'll drink some milk on rare occasions, but doesn't like dairy in general.

I know that these are low standards, but it's been a major battle just to put those into place.  If I were trying to force anything else into place, she simply wouldn't eat.  She's perfectly capable of not eating if the only other option is to try to eat something that makes her gag. If she's at a friend's house and they don't have anything that she eats (she doesn't eat pizza, which is what the other parent's often order if there is a gaggle of girls at their house, for instance, or won't eat a pb&j, if it isn't the correct brand of pb,j or bread), she just won't eat, telling the other parents that she just not hungry.  It's as extreme as the "rain man" character and I often wonder if it is a piece of the puzzle of autism.

Dorothy can be extremely flaky.  I think that that is part of her extreme artistic nature.  However, all of the years and years of dance have developed a part of her brain that is almost computer-like.  And, no, she's not autistic, nor does she have Asperger's.  She's extremely social and interacts well.  But she is a spacey flake a lot of the time (if you ask her a question, she'll, regularly, give you some bizarre answer having to do with something else, someone else or some other time - this happen regularly), yet was consistently tested as Gifted and Talented.  She's popular and has lots of friends, but will often choose to be by herself to read.

I would think that, as suggested by others, getting her involved with something that she loves but that also gets your daughter moving regularly would help.  If you can find the thing that taps into her mentally and emotionally, it might help the "space-out" factor.  Like I said,  Dorothy can be a complete flake, yet she can remember ever piece of choreography that she has ever learned since she was 3.  She can't tell you what she did yesterday in the correct sequence, but can learn a complicated dance combination, in one try, when a teacher simply tells it to her.  She has difficulty reading and following language arts passages (as far as plot and progression), yet can easily, at age 13, do long division of multiple polynomials.  

I truly believe that children of this type posses many of the traits of autistic savants, but are able to function in the real world.  The thing to do is to find what feeds their need for order and brain processing.  Dorothy knew, at age 2, that dance was it for her.  I'm not sure that she would be as well-rounded, social and have such good self-esteem if she didn't have it in her life.

I'm not really offering much advise here...just letting you know that I understand the food issues.  Try to be easy on yourself.  You can only do so much...the rest will have to be addressed by your daughter, either now or in the future.


FRESH START TODAY!!!
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Jane
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 2:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Fascinating post, Equipro.  I had some of the same issues with my older son who is now 36.  His thing was music and I don't think it was as extreme.  He was reading at 3, tested at 8th grade level by the 3rd grade.
Ruthie, as I said before, I think you are doing an awesome job with you kids.  It's exhausting, believe me I remember.  Just make sure to take care of yourself.
Jane
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EquiPro
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 2:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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This week has been "parent's observation" at her studio, so I have been at all 22 hours of classes, video taping.  As soon as I've gone through the vids and edited them, I'll post a quick clip of the girls learning the ballet combinations.  It's just astounding, and some can "get" it, and some can't...


FRESH START TODAY!!!
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Momotaro
Saturday, November 12, 2011, 4:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
OK, so if step one is "make sure the child has enough calories" then I'm even more hesitant to cut out the chocolate chips! She does seem pretty intuitive about which foods do and don't agree with her. She craves apples, which are an Explorer superfood. She doesn't seem to like any nuts or seeds. She does eat plenty of meat- not too much at one time, but she never feels satisfied if we don't have meat so we have it almost every day, and plenty of cheese and/or fish on other days. I make sure to always have healthy "real food" available to her- veggie soups,  broccolli quiche, and cookies she can take with her to school.

Momotaro- I just reserved that book you suggested, even though it's labeled as a book to help kids with autism- is ADD considered part of the spectrum?


How does she eat the chocolate chips?  Plain, straight out of the bag?  If so, would she be satisfied enough if it were incorporated with other ingredients, such as cookies?  If she doesn't seem to like nuts or seeds, what if it were mixed with the chocolate chip cookies into trail mix, would she eat it then?

She currently eats cheese, but has she ever been dairy free?  I know with the blood type diet, some blood types are given the allowance to eat certain dairy.  However, I keep returning to the site dogtorj.com every so often to reconsider what is written there.  It says that powerful, industrial strength glues are made from gluten, casein, and soy (I keep visualizing the one he said about the rearview mirror to the windshield!).  And corn too except it makes for adhesives not as strong (cardboard).  They are so sticky, and that's why they cause trouble in the intestines.  So I don't know, but that site sure has food for thought!  The author of the book also recommends cutting dairy.

Would she eat okra/is it a beneficial for her?  If so, I learned that okra is one of the best foods to "lock" the lectin and it is the gooey substance in the okra that does that.

I don't know if ADD is part of the spectrum, but I don't think it matters..... she can help anyone with nutrition since she is a dietitian.  Actually my son is not on the spectrum either.  He only was/is dealing with food intolerances.  But he was dropping really fast on his growth chart and had too-numerous-to-count symptoms from the food intolerances.  So when someone suggested to me her counseling/book, I looked it up.  

There were several things that made me go for her services.  She is a registered dietitian (vs. a nutritionist) so she has had the accredited schooling and clinical experience, and most likely needs to keep up to date with continuing education.  The best thing that, in my opinion, qualified her (for me to go with her services) is that she also -as a registered dietitian - has had personal experience dealing with this with her own son, and getting frustrated with traditional medical care, she had to search out what really works.  That combo was great in my opinion since I wanted long-term healing, not a quick, short-term band-aid fix, for my son which I knew would not come with "mainstream" doctors or dietitians who do not know about alternative type care (no offense to them... in fact, I have friends who could be considered "mainstream" dietitians).  And then to top it off, I saw that she worked at a place that I had personal, first-hand experience (insider's view) of seeing what kind of employees the company would hire.  So although not necessarily keen on the company itself, I liked the knowledge and quality of  the employees there (at least those that I had contact with/in that department).
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PCUK-Positive
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 2:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Have you tried Iodine supplementation, (early in the day), to avoid causing being awake at night.



Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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ruthiegirl
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 3:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Momotaro


How does she eat the chocolate chips?  Plain, straight out of the bag?  If so, would she be satisfied enough if it were incorporated with other ingredients, such as cookies?  If she doesn't seem to like nuts or seeds, what if it were mixed with the chocolate chip cookies into trail mix, would she eat it then?
She eats chocolate chips straight out of the bag. If I baked them into cookies, she'd still eat the cookies, but it wouldn't take away from her desire for plain chips at other times. If I made trail mix with the chips, she'd pick out the chips and leave the nuts and seeds. I should probably try to find some dried fruit she'll eat- there was one kind of dried papaya she liked, but only sold in one store that's a 20 minute drive away, in an area without any other needed errands. I haven't been there in months.

Quoted Text
She currently eats cheese, but has she ever been dairy free?
No, she hasn't. I'm nervous about cutting out dairy when I also need to make sure she  gets enough animal protein.

Quoted Text
Would she eat okra/is it a beneficial for her?  If so, I learned that okra is one of the best foods to "lock" the lectin and it is the gooey substance in the okra that does that.
Okra is beneficial or diamond for Os, Hunters, Gatherers, and Explorers. So I guess it would definitely be good for her, but I've never cooked with it and I'm not sure exactly what to do with it, and I have no clue if she'd like it or not.

PC, no, I haven't tried iodine supplementation. I'll see if I an get her to do that iodine patch test when she wakes up this afternoon.



Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Sahara
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 4:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Just a few other thoughts about what might help...

*Maybe she has a candida overgrowth from the chocolate chips and would benefit from a homeopathic protocol or some kind of cleanse:
http://www.aquaflorainc.com/

*She does need to lose 15 lbs & the only way is to make her eat the diet and exercise.  I was 15 lbs overweight at her age which caused me a lot of problems socially.  She needs to learn something about fitness even if it's just doing something like Zumba dancing.  The concern is that if she goes away to school (or whatever her post hs plans may be) with a weight problem and hasn't learned anything about diet/exercise, how will she ever be happy?  Weight problems are an energy drain.

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Patty H
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 9:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ruthie, I empathize with you.  It is very difficult to control or manage what a teenager eats.  Trust me, I know this from personal experience, not just with my own teens (who are now in their early 20's) but also with several foreign exchange students.

The one glaring thing I have been wondering about is meat - where is the meat/animal protein in her diet?  What is she eating for protein.  As an O, she should be eating meat, poultry and fish.  Will she eat these things?  How about olive oil?

Sorry if I missed this someplace else in the thread.  I read all of the first page posts and skimmed through the second page.  I'll go back and read each of the second page posts when I have more time.

I would get rid of the chocolate chips.  I think the sugar is causing some of the problems.  Why don't you talk to her about this and see if she is willing to go through the food lists to pick out an alternative food to the chocolate chips, such as nuts.  Sugar is bad, bad, bad.  Take her grocery shopping and let her pick out the healthy food she is wlling to eat.  I always used to do that with the foreign exchange student when they came to live with me.  That way I learned what they ate and had it on hand for them.

I hope some of this is helpful.  Good luck.


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ruthiegirl
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 9:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The meat is at family dinners (which you'll find me agonizing over on a separate thread, with "meal plan" in the title.) One night a week I make pizza (mozzarella cheese and spelt flour dough) but usually I make beef or turkey (or a mixture of the two, if it's meatball night) and I'm trying to branch out into fish for dinner, to better balance out my SWAMI portion reccomendations with DD1's. Except for pizza night (when she often eats leftover meat at lunch) dinner consists of a meat, a grain (which she usually doens't eat), an orange veggie (sweet potatoes, carrots, or squash) and a green veggie (green beans, broccolli, or salad.) She consistenly eats the orange veggie, but the green veggie is totally a matter of texture. Salad she won't touch, but she'll eat the green beans or broccolli if it's cooked "just right" but not if it's undercooked or overcooked. I don't worry too much since there's spinach in the veggie soups and the broccolli quiche that she has for breakfast most days.

What I think I might do with the chocolate is make another batch of the kind I can eat: melt unsweetened baking chocolate, mix in molasses, let it cool. Then she's getting the minerals from the molasses rather than the "empty calories" of the sugar. If she likes this mixture, she'll have a healthier alternative to commercial chocolate chips.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Chloe
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 10:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Equipro, your daughter sounds a lot like my granddaughter.  Genius IQ...socially does well with
her friends but will often retreat to read...behaves like a space cadet around parents and grandparents. Seems clueless.  One
day when asked to put her glass in the dishwasher, she put it in the sink...She honestly thought
a dishwasher is where the dishes are washed. (by an adult)  It sounds funny on some level...but she's so
"out there" that we're all perplexed. ..She's also a dancer...Goes to dance class 4x a week...the
way she gets out of her head and into her body. She has a computer like mind....often moody....hardly ever eats....Sometimes I think she's living on another planet.. Her favorite food is chocolate.  Doesn't ever know when she's hungry. Going on 15 in January.  5'6"....super lanky....blood type A+  Eats like a pigeon.  It often appears to me that her blood sugar is too low..
and this is why she zones out.  Give her food that might quickly raise her blood sugar and her personality seems to change.  She becomes more engaging and talkative.  Like she returns to
the human race.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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DoS
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Sounds like a teacher...
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PCUK-Positive
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 11:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Age: 53
we used to give Emily pizza on Sunday nights because all her finds got it, used to let her have juice at the coffee shop because her finds had it, etc etc.

now all her Friends have water, they are all stopping drinking milk, they all have plain crisps because Emily has them, all her finds want to know what wonders she has in her lunch box at school.

because she is so leve headed and sweet and attentive and calm, she is winning them all round and other parents are really taking notice.

when we see another one in the play ground losing weight that had be grilling me two weeks before about diet. it's encouraging , even though they never acknowledge anything lol

even Emily's teacher keeps commenting an how bright she is, and she keeps getting certificate after certificate, whereas in the past she got none. people came up to see her picture today that she was drawing  in a coffee shop, they wanted to know if a relative was an artist they were that impressed, all four of them,

I urge everyone to just bite the bullet and really go complaint and do a few crazy things like a teaspoon of flax oil, and a reduction of sugar and grain (for O's) It'll just improve your lives and your kids. I'm still gob smacked at the difference in just not cheating (sweets, pizza, juice)



Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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Patty H
Monday, November 14, 2011, 4:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
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Age: 56
Quoted from ruthiegirl
The meat is at family dinners (which you'll find me agonizing over on a separate thread, with "meal plan" in the title.) One night a week I make pizza (mozzarella cheese and spelt flour dough) but usually I make beef or turkey (or a mixture of the two, if it's meatball night) and I'm trying to branch out into fish for dinner, to better balance out my SWAMI portion reccomendations with DD1's. Except for pizza night (when she often eats leftover meat at lunch) dinner consists of a meat, a grain (which she usually doens't eat), an orange veggie (sweet potatoes, carrots, or squash) and a green veggie (green beans, broccolli, or salad.) She consistenly eats the orange veggie, but the green veggie is totally a matter of texture. Salad she won't touch, but she'll eat the green beans or broccolli if it's cooked "just right" but not if it's undercooked or overcooked. I don't worry too much since there's spinach in the veggie soups and the broccolli quiche that she has for breakfast most days.

What I think I might do with the chocolate is make another batch of the kind I can eat: melt unsweetened baking chocolate, mix in molasses, let it cool. Then she's getting the minerals from the molasses rather than the "empty calories" of the sugar. If she likes this mixture, she'll have a healthier alternative to commercial chocolate chips.


Ruthie, I know that finances are difficult for you.  However, I might recommend that you try to figure out a way to be sure that she gets animal protein at each meal.  IMHO, I might consider cutting out some of the supplements you purchase in order to afford more animal protein.  Or maybe there is something else you can cut out in order to purchase more animal protein.  Ground beef, which is much less expensive would be good.  I think it is always best to try to get your nutrients from food rather than supplements.

Also, I think you should work on cutting out all the sugar, whether it is a chocolate mixture you make for her or one that you buy.  No one should live on chocolate.  It sounds like she eats it all the time.  Chocolate should be an occasional treat - not an every day food source, whether it is sweetened with sugar or with molasses.  This boils down to good habit formation.  The formation of the understanding of "everything in moderation".  

It sounds like you have real concerns.  Have you actually sat down and discussed these concerns with her?  Have you set up a conference with her teachers to see if you can get more information about her ability to focus in class?  If not, I would recommend this as soon as possible.  Then when you sit down with her to discuss your concerns and a game plan, you can focus more on what her teachers say so it is not just about you worrying.  I always like to have teachers information because it makes it less between you and her and more a concern for her academics and her fututre prospects for college, etc.  Sometimes I think the dynamic between mothers and daughters can be difficult, so having the information from teachers or another outside source takes away some of the tension between you (I am not implying there is tension, just saying I understand that there can be  ).

I liked EquiPro's rules.  I think those are good rules for any teenager.  I always had food rules for my kids.  

Also remember that as the purchaser of the food and the person who controls the purse strings, you do have control over what you bring into the house.  That is why I recommended going through food lists to see what it is she would consider eating, taking her shopping and letting her choose foods and then consistently having those foods on hand.  For instance, it sounds like EquiPro must keep bushels of strawberries on hand.  With a teenager, even if they were an avoid for their BT/GT, I would consider this a much better choice than eating chocolate chips as a main food staple.  Most kids expand their food choices as they get older.  We just have to get them through those tough years by giving them good food choices and buying healthy food you know they will consistently consume!  I ate a ton of oranges as a kid.  My mother could not keep enough of them in the house.  Now I know that oranges are not great for me, but certainly eating an orange is a better choice than eating sugary snacks, so sometimes with older kids it boils down to the lesser of the two evils.  

Have you started to teach her how to cook?  I also found that teaching teens to cook helps them to have a much better appreciation of food.  Both of my kids are really good cooks now and I find that as they expand their cooking skills, they also expand their willingness to try new and different foods.

Keep up the great work.  I feel for you and I do understand!  (((HUGS)))


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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 5:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yup, I've tried teaching her to cook. Sometimes she's interested in helping, but most of the time she's too "spaced out" to help me when it's time to cook; or she was playing earlier and finally got started on homework when I need help cooking.

She told me earlier this weekend that she's getting tired of the kind of cookies I'd been baking for her (brown sugar, eggs, spelt flour) and wants something different. So I made a completely different kind of dough (which I'll bake in a few minutes.) This has pureed raisins and oats, eggs, ground flax seed, molasses, rolled oats, and spelt flour. No refined sugar in this batch, plus it has fruit (raisins) and vegetable protein (flax.) I also decided not to buy more chocolate chips the next time I'm in Trader Joe's (there's still about 1/4 package in there.)

I'm not  going to limit her consumption of "real foods" even if they are high in sugars, such as apple juice (which she only drinks when she needs to get her  blood sugar up quickly and doesn't have any appetite yet) or whole apples. I'll try to find dried fruits she likes, to eat at times she would otherwise reach for chocolate. I'll try to sneak as much nutrition into those soups and the cookies as possible.

I really don't spend a whole lot of money on supplements, and anyway I just placed a huge order at Swanson's (taking advantage of a coupon) so I'm well stocked on the ones we use, and don't need to spend more money on them. I have two kinds of multivitamins (chewable/not fully compliant and compliant capsules), fish oil capsules, liquid CLO for DS, B-complex capsules, B-12 in  both capsule and chewable form, and 3  different kinds of elderberry (proberry caps, proberry liquid, and Sambuca syrup for DS.) plus vitamin D in 5,000 iu capsules and in liquid drops.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Patty H
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
Yup, I've tried teaching her to cook. Sometimes she's interested in helping, but most of the time she's too "spaced out" to help me when it's time to cook; or she was playing earlier and finally got started on homework when I need help cooking.

She told me earlier this weekend that she's getting tired of the kind of cookies I'd been baking for her (brown sugar, eggs, spelt flour) and wants something different. So I made a completely different kind of dough (which I'll bake in a few minutes.) This has pureed raisins and oats, eggs, ground flax seed, molasses, rolled oats, and spelt flour. No refined sugar in this batch, plus it has fruit (raisins) and vegetable protein (flax.) I also decided not to buy more chocolate chips the next time I'm in Trader Joe's (there's still about 1/4 package in there.)

I'm not  going to limit her consumption of "real foods" even if they are high in sugars, such as apple juice (which she only drinks when she needs to get her  blood sugar up quickly and doesn't have any appetite yet) or whole apples. I'll try to find dried fruits she likes, to eat at times she would otherwise reach for chocolate. I'll try to sneak as much nutrition into those soups and the cookies as possible.

I really don't spend a whole lot of money on supplements, and anyway I just placed a huge order at Swanson's (taking advantage of a coupon) so I'm well stocked on the ones we use, and don't need to spend more money on them. I have two kinds of multivitamins (chewable/not fully compliant and compliant capsules), fish oil capsules, liquid CLO for DS, B-complex capsules, B-12 in  both capsule and chewable form, and 3  different kinds of elderberry (proberry caps, proberry liquid, and Sambuca syrup for DS.) plus vitamin D in 5,000 iu capsules and in liquid drops.


The cookies sound good.  Keep plugging at it and keep up the good work.  I can relate to all of this because my 23 year old daughter has no desire to go wheat or dairy free.  If I want to have a good relationship with her, I just have to let it go.  Once in a while if she is sick, she will listen to me or ask for my advice, but on a daily basis, her diet is not so great unless she is eating dinner with us.  The older they get, the less control you have.  Also, what was difficult for my husband and me was that we had our food routines and shopping lists fairly well set and then our daughter came home to live after college and she has her own ideas about food, so that has been an adjustment for all three of us.  



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Jane
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Will she eat pumpkin or sweet potato Ruthie?.  You could add those to cookies or make pie or cakes.
I made a pumpkin pie last week and substituted about 1 cup almond milk and agave( I used 1/4 cup but next time I'll use less) for the sweetened condensed milk that usually is used in pumpkin pie.  I grind pecans up and add just a touch of turbinado sugar and press them into a pie plate that I've melted a small amount of ghee in.  I use the regular spices, cinnamon, nutmeg, a pinch of cloves, a little sea salt, ginger and sometimes add 1 tsp of pure vanilla.  I usually bake it in a deep dish pie plate but have also used a souffle dish. Bake at 425 for 15 minutes then 40-50 minutes at 350.  It's really delicious and filling.
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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sweet potatoes are a dinner staple at our house, and we do make pumpkin pie fairly frequently (though I haven't in a few weeks.) She also gets carrots and butternut squash in those soups I make.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
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I just  finished going through that book on children's nutrition that momotaro reccomended. I had high hopes for it, but there truly was nothing in there applicable to my family. Not that the author wouldn't be able to help DD2 if she saw her, but this book is focused too much on much younger children with much more serious food aversions than DD2 has. There wasn't enough information on dealing with subtle issues.

The whole focus of that "make sure the child gets enough calories" has to do with "ensuring enough calories for growth" ahead of all other concerns. DD2 is almost done growing, and is certainly NOT "underweight for her height." I need to make sure she eats enough to keep her blood sugar stable, as low blood sugar leads to innatentiveness, but the whole "growth" thing simply isn't a concern in her case. Yes, she's super-short, but in her case I'm convinced it's due to genetics. Her dad is only 5'5" tall, one of her aunts (dad's sister) is barely 5 feet, and I'm only 5'2" tall. I don't think that feeding her any more would make her any taller.

So far today she's eaten well and hasn't reached for any chocolate chips.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Sahara
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Well this is kind of an OT suggestion.  You might consider looking at her vedic chart to find out more about her constitution.  The first house and lagnesh shows a lot about the physical body and ongoing health issues are the 6th house.  The vedic chart will tell you what her dominant dosha; ie, vata, pitta or kapha.  

Barbara Pijan Lama probably has the best vedic website online; her fees are quite expensive but there is a ton of info you can work with to do the chart yourself:

http://barbarapijan.com/bpa/bAstrHom.htm
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Easy E
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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I'm A+ but an explorer.  It can be tough for explorers when they consume too many toxins and don't exercise enough to focus and really feel settled and to really listen and pay attention to the whole thing.  This is my experience anyway.

It seems like some other GT's focus is not affected as much by taking in too much of the wrong stuff.  Could be wrong though.
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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 11:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 14442
Well this is kind of an OT suggestion.  You might consider looking at her vedic chart to find out more about her constitution.  The first house and lagnesh shows a lot about the physical body and ongoing health issues are the 6th house.  The vedic chart will tell you what her dominant dosha; ie, vata, pitta or kapha.  

Barbara Pijan Lama probably has the best vedic website online; her fees are quite expensive but there is a ton of info you can work with to do the chart yourself:

http://barbarapijan.com/bpa/bAstrHom.htm


I don't have the mental energy to explore this in depth right now. Could you give me a brief overview of what this kind of analysis uncovers, and how that information is used in a practical way? Would it come up with exercise reccomendations, or a list of specific aromatherapy oils to try, or dietary reccomendations?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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