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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  How to help 15yo Type O  "tune in" to the world?
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How to help 15yo Type O  "tune in" to the world?  This thread currently has 2,059 views. Print Print Thread
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DoS
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 10:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

L (a-b+); Slight-Taster; INFJ; Warrior
Ee Dan
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Sounds like a teacher...
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PCUK-Positive
Sunday, November 13, 2011, 11:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer Rh+, NN, (lewis a+ b-) [Duffy Fy(a+b+) ]
Kyosha Nim
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Location: UK
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we used to give Emily pizza on Sunday nights because all her finds got it, used to let her have juice at the coffee shop because her finds had it, etc etc.

now all her Friends have water, they are all stopping drinking milk, they all have plain crisps because Emily has them, all her finds want to know what wonders she has in her lunch box at school.

because she is so leve headed and sweet and attentive and calm, she is winning them all round and other parents are really taking notice.

when we see another one in the play ground losing weight that had be grilling me two weeks before about diet. it's encouraging , even though they never acknowledge anything lol

even Emily's teacher keeps commenting an how bright she is, and she keeps getting certificate after certificate, whereas in the past she got none. people came up to see her picture today that she was drawing  in a coffee shop, they wanted to know if a relative was an artist they were that impressed, all four of them,

I urge everyone to just bite the bullet and really go complaint and do a few crazy things like a teaspoon of flax oil, and a reduction of sugar and grain (for O's) It'll just improve your lives and your kids. I'm still gob smacked at the difference in just not cheating (sweets, pizza, juice)



Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
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Patty H
Monday, November 14, 2011, 4:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
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Age: 56
Quoted from ruthiegirl
The meat is at family dinners (which you'll find me agonizing over on a separate thread, with "meal plan" in the title.) One night a week I make pizza (mozzarella cheese and spelt flour dough) but usually I make beef or turkey (or a mixture of the two, if it's meatball night) and I'm trying to branch out into fish for dinner, to better balance out my SWAMI portion reccomendations with DD1's. Except for pizza night (when she often eats leftover meat at lunch) dinner consists of a meat, a grain (which she usually doens't eat), an orange veggie (sweet potatoes, carrots, or squash) and a green veggie (green beans, broccolli, or salad.) She consistenly eats the orange veggie, but the green veggie is totally a matter of texture. Salad she won't touch, but she'll eat the green beans or broccolli if it's cooked "just right" but not if it's undercooked or overcooked. I don't worry too much since there's spinach in the veggie soups and the broccolli quiche that she has for breakfast most days.

What I think I might do with the chocolate is make another batch of the kind I can eat: melt unsweetened baking chocolate, mix in molasses, let it cool. Then she's getting the minerals from the molasses rather than the "empty calories" of the sugar. If she likes this mixture, she'll have a healthier alternative to commercial chocolate chips.


Ruthie, I know that finances are difficult for you.  However, I might recommend that you try to figure out a way to be sure that she gets animal protein at each meal.  IMHO, I might consider cutting out some of the supplements you purchase in order to afford more animal protein.  Or maybe there is something else you can cut out in order to purchase more animal protein.  Ground beef, which is much less expensive would be good.  I think it is always best to try to get your nutrients from food rather than supplements.

Also, I think you should work on cutting out all the sugar, whether it is a chocolate mixture you make for her or one that you buy.  No one should live on chocolate.  It sounds like she eats it all the time.  Chocolate should be an occasional treat - not an every day food source, whether it is sweetened with sugar or with molasses.  This boils down to good habit formation.  The formation of the understanding of "everything in moderation".  

It sounds like you have real concerns.  Have you actually sat down and discussed these concerns with her?  Have you set up a conference with her teachers to see if you can get more information about her ability to focus in class?  If not, I would recommend this as soon as possible.  Then when you sit down with her to discuss your concerns and a game plan, you can focus more on what her teachers say so it is not just about you worrying.  I always like to have teachers information because it makes it less between you and her and more a concern for her academics and her fututre prospects for college, etc.  Sometimes I think the dynamic between mothers and daughters can be difficult, so having the information from teachers or another outside source takes away some of the tension between you (I am not implying there is tension, just saying I understand that there can be  ).

I liked EquiPro's rules.  I think those are good rules for any teenager.  I always had food rules for my kids.  

Also remember that as the purchaser of the food and the person who controls the purse strings, you do have control over what you bring into the house.  That is why I recommended going through food lists to see what it is she would consider eating, taking her shopping and letting her choose foods and then consistently having those foods on hand.  For instance, it sounds like EquiPro must keep bushels of strawberries on hand.  With a teenager, even if they were an avoid for their BT/GT, I would consider this a much better choice than eating chocolate chips as a main food staple.  Most kids expand their food choices as they get older.  We just have to get them through those tough years by giving them good food choices and buying healthy food you know they will consistently consume!  I ate a ton of oranges as a kid.  My mother could not keep enough of them in the house.  Now I know that oranges are not great for me, but certainly eating an orange is a better choice than eating sugary snacks, so sometimes with older kids it boils down to the lesser of the two evils.  

Have you started to teach her how to cook?  I also found that teaching teens to cook helps them to have a much better appreciation of food.  Both of my kids are really good cooks now and I find that as they expand their cooking skills, they also expand their willingness to try new and different foods.

Keep up the great work.  I feel for you and I do understand!  (((HUGS)))


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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 5:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
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Yup, I've tried teaching her to cook. Sometimes she's interested in helping, but most of the time she's too "spaced out" to help me when it's time to cook; or she was playing earlier and finally got started on homework when I need help cooking.

She told me earlier this weekend that she's getting tired of the kind of cookies I'd been baking for her (brown sugar, eggs, spelt flour) and wants something different. So I made a completely different kind of dough (which I'll bake in a few minutes.) This has pureed raisins and oats, eggs, ground flax seed, molasses, rolled oats, and spelt flour. No refined sugar in this batch, plus it has fruit (raisins) and vegetable protein (flax.) I also decided not to buy more chocolate chips the next time I'm in Trader Joe's (there's still about 1/4 package in there.)

I'm not  going to limit her consumption of "real foods" even if they are high in sugars, such as apple juice (which she only drinks when she needs to get her  blood sugar up quickly and doesn't have any appetite yet) or whole apples. I'll try to find dried fruits she likes, to eat at times she would otherwise reach for chocolate. I'll try to sneak as much nutrition into those soups and the cookies as possible.

I really don't spend a whole lot of money on supplements, and anyway I just placed a huge order at Swanson's (taking advantage of a coupon) so I'm well stocked on the ones we use, and don't need to spend more money on them. I have two kinds of multivitamins (chewable/not fully compliant and compliant capsules), fish oil capsules, liquid CLO for DS, B-complex capsules, B-12 in  both capsule and chewable form, and 3  different kinds of elderberry (proberry caps, proberry liquid, and Sambuca syrup for DS.) plus vitamin D in 5,000 iu capsules and in liquid drops.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Patty H
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster
Ee Dan
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
Yup, I've tried teaching her to cook. Sometimes she's interested in helping, but most of the time she's too "spaced out" to help me when it's time to cook; or she was playing earlier and finally got started on homework when I need help cooking.

She told me earlier this weekend that she's getting tired of the kind of cookies I'd been baking for her (brown sugar, eggs, spelt flour) and wants something different. So I made a completely different kind of dough (which I'll bake in a few minutes.) This has pureed raisins and oats, eggs, ground flax seed, molasses, rolled oats, and spelt flour. No refined sugar in this batch, plus it has fruit (raisins) and vegetable protein (flax.) I also decided not to buy more chocolate chips the next time I'm in Trader Joe's (there's still about 1/4 package in there.)

I'm not  going to limit her consumption of "real foods" even if they are high in sugars, such as apple juice (which she only drinks when she needs to get her  blood sugar up quickly and doesn't have any appetite yet) or whole apples. I'll try to find dried fruits she likes, to eat at times she would otherwise reach for chocolate. I'll try to sneak as much nutrition into those soups and the cookies as possible.

I really don't spend a whole lot of money on supplements, and anyway I just placed a huge order at Swanson's (taking advantage of a coupon) so I'm well stocked on the ones we use, and don't need to spend more money on them. I have two kinds of multivitamins (chewable/not fully compliant and compliant capsules), fish oil capsules, liquid CLO for DS, B-complex capsules, B-12 in  both capsule and chewable form, and 3  different kinds of elderberry (proberry caps, proberry liquid, and Sambuca syrup for DS.) plus vitamin D in 5,000 iu capsules and in liquid drops.


The cookies sound good.  Keep plugging at it and keep up the good work.  I can relate to all of this because my 23 year old daughter has no desire to go wheat or dairy free.  If I want to have a good relationship with her, I just have to let it go.  Once in a while if she is sick, she will listen to me or ask for my advice, but on a daily basis, her diet is not so great unless she is eating dinner with us.  The older they get, the less control you have.  Also, what was difficult for my husband and me was that we had our food routines and shopping lists fairly well set and then our daughter came home to live after college and she has her own ideas about food, so that has been an adjustment for all three of us.  



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Jane
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Will she eat pumpkin or sweet potato Ruthie?.  You could add those to cookies or make pie or cakes.
I made a pumpkin pie last week and substituted about 1 cup almond milk and agave( I used 1/4 cup but next time I'll use less) for the sweetened condensed milk that usually is used in pumpkin pie.  I grind pecans up and add just a touch of turbinado sugar and press them into a pie plate that I've melted a small amount of ghee in.  I use the regular spices, cinnamon, nutmeg, a pinch of cloves, a little sea salt, ginger and sometimes add 1 tsp of pure vanilla.  I usually bake it in a deep dish pie plate but have also used a souffle dish. Bake at 425 for 15 minutes then 40-50 minutes at 350.  It's really delicious and filling.
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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 6:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
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Sweet potatoes are a dinner staple at our house, and we do make pumpkin pie fairly frequently (though I haven't in a few weeks.) She also gets carrots and butternut squash in those soups I make.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
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I just  finished going through that book on children's nutrition that momotaro reccomended. I had high hopes for it, but there truly was nothing in there applicable to my family. Not that the author wouldn't be able to help DD2 if she saw her, but this book is focused too much on much younger children with much more serious food aversions than DD2 has. There wasn't enough information on dealing with subtle issues.

The whole focus of that "make sure the child gets enough calories" has to do with "ensuring enough calories for growth" ahead of all other concerns. DD2 is almost done growing, and is certainly NOT "underweight for her height." I need to make sure she eats enough to keep her blood sugar stable, as low blood sugar leads to innatentiveness, but the whole "growth" thing simply isn't a concern in her case. Yes, she's super-short, but in her case I'm convinced it's due to genetics. Her dad is only 5'5" tall, one of her aunts (dad's sister) is barely 5 feet, and I'm only 5'2" tall. I don't think that feeding her any more would make her any taller.

So far today she's eaten well and hasn't reached for any chocolate chips.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Sahara
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Well this is kind of an OT suggestion.  You might consider looking at her vedic chart to find out more about her constitution.  The first house and lagnesh shows a lot about the physical body and ongoing health issues are the 6th house.  The vedic chart will tell you what her dominant dosha; ie, vata, pitta or kapha.  

Barbara Pijan Lama probably has the best vedic website online; her fees are quite expensive but there is a ton of info you can work with to do the chart yourself:

http://barbarapijan.com/bpa/bAstrHom.htm
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Easy E
Monday, November 14, 2011, 9:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+ Explorer, non-secretor
Ee Dan
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I'm A+ but an explorer.  It can be tough for explorers when they consume too many toxins and don't exercise enough to focus and really feel settled and to really listen and pay attention to the whole thing.  This is my experience anyway.

It seems like some other GT's focus is not affected as much by taking in too much of the wrong stuff.  Could be wrong though.
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ruthiegirl
Monday, November 14, 2011, 11:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from 14442
Well this is kind of an OT suggestion.  You might consider looking at her vedic chart to find out more about her constitution.  The first house and lagnesh shows a lot about the physical body and ongoing health issues are the 6th house.  The vedic chart will tell you what her dominant dosha; ie, vata, pitta or kapha.  

Barbara Pijan Lama probably has the best vedic website online; her fees are quite expensive but there is a ton of info you can work with to do the chart yourself:

http://barbarapijan.com/bpa/bAstrHom.htm


I don't have the mental energy to explore this in depth right now. Could you give me a brief overview of what this kind of analysis uncovers, and how that information is used in a practical way? Would it come up with exercise reccomendations, or a list of specific aromatherapy oils to try, or dietary reccomendations?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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