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 Are you interested in your family history?
Yes. I've researched my genealogy. (31 votes)
54.39%
Yes. I want to learn more about my family's past. (21 votes)
36.84%
No, I live in the present. (5 votes)
8.77%
57 Votes Total Last vote Thursday, August 6, 2009, 5:32am by 5814
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Ancestry  This thread currently has 3,445 views. Print Print Thread
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BohemianChris
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 2:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
I've been finding ancestors on other ancestry.com member trees and building a family tree that goes back to all the old countries. It wasn't hard to link my grandma's Mom's grandparents back to Ireland, but her Dad's family led me way back into Canadian and American history. I even found a few relatives who had to flee Salem, Massachusettes after being accused of witchcraft.

I suppose most of these ancestors passed on traits like my hair color, eye color, build, etc., but the origin of my B blood type is more mysterious. Its a thin genetic thread from a single Bohemian ancestor on my Mom's Dad's side undiluted by the sea of O's and A's in my European family's blood.

And according to Dr. D'Adamo's Blood Type Encyclopedia, that B blood type is essentially an Asian blood type that migrated through Semitic groups into Eastern Europe. That is a piece of history that my overwhelmingly Catholic family is oblivious to.

I hope DNA can help me understand the migration from Asia to Bohemia in the Czech Republic and eventually to America intact of this key piece of info. A thread links me to the distant past and guides my body's inflammatory survival strategy, my risks for diseases, even personality traits. Call it thread theory. One seemingly trivial family heirloom can shape my entire life and self-knowledge is the key to reaching my genetic potential.


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Lola
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
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''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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BohemianChris
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
Thanks Lola. The Genographic Project is the DNA test I was thinking about. First because its the least expensive and second because it contributes to overall scientific knowledge.


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Maldo
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 3:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Posts: 300
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Location: New York
Age: 45
I did the genographic test with national geographic - its so interesting and I highly recommend it.   (Although, I cant make the connection to genotype - I guess it doesnt make sense to make such a connection)

I also found out that one of my ancestors got put to death around 1150 in england for certain misdemeanors...


"You're not disabled by the disabilities you have, you are able by the abilities you have." - Oscar Pistorius
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BohemianChris
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 4:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
There's a passage in Deep Ancestry by Spencer Wells which is the official book for the National Geographic Genographic Study that describes how Lewontin turned preexisting ideas of genetic variation on its head by discovering, using DNA, that 85% of genetic variation occurs within groups of people, not among different nationalities of races. Also in Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes describes his controversial mitochondrial DNA finding that 80% of modern European DNA is hunter-gatherer and 20% is more recent farmer genetics.

What this means is that the diversity of survival strategis that seperates, say, a Hunter from a Teacher is very much intact and well distributed among populations. Type O is interesting for its resilience. Because its recessive, it can lay dormant for generations and then just pop up! My hope is that these unique people don't have problems fitting in.


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BohemianChris
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 4:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
To clarify the last point. My Dad is type A and he's lost a lot of weight by mostly eating bread. I'm Type B and I thrive on a diet much lower in carbs. Of course, I grew up eating plenty of wheat and it didn't seem to hit me until I was 20 and I lost weight and had digestive problems. The gastoenterologist I went to was a nice man, but he actually said to my parents "Diet doesn't matter in Crohn's Disease." He couldn't be more wrong. But I guess from his perspective, he can't control what people eat and he doesn't know specifically what any individual patient should eat. This, one has to find out for oneself (with a little help from this site


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bdavid
Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 9:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I am B+ and my mother's side of the family is from Ireland (pretty darn close to 100% heritage) and my father's side is from Bohemia (i am third generation on his side so they came right off the boat) I can't figure out how I got mine either.
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RedLilac
Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 12:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI tweaked Explorer Super Taster from Illinois
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,042
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Location: Lombard, Illinois (Chicago suburb)
Age: 63
I waffled between Yes and I want to know more.  I decided that I want to know more.  My O+ Mother is Polish.  She had dark brown hair and brown eyes.  I have light brown hair and green eyes.  Some of her siblings had hazel eyes and blond hair from picture of her parents it looks like my grandfather was the light eyed light haired one and my Grandmother was the dark haired beauty.  Grandfatherís side has been linked to Bella Russia and Lithuania.  My Grandfather was born in Warsaw Poland.  My Grandmother was born in Michigan, USA.  Iím curious where her ancestors came from.  They both died when my mother was growing up.

My AB- Father is Ĺ WASP & Ĺ Jew.  He had light brown hair and blue eyes. Both sides of the family disinherited them when they married.  My Grandfatherís family can be traced to 1635 in America from both my Fatherís Grandfatherís family and his Grandmotherís family.  That side of him is Dutch, English and Welsh.  The Jewish side is English &German.  They came to America in the 1800ís.  My uncles went to the Mormon Tabernacle in Utah to trace part of that side of the familyís ancestry because a relative stopped off there for supplies during the gold rush and everyone was required to give their history.

So some I know, but Iíd like to more about the different paths backward in my ancestry.  I suspect the B in me comes from my Jewish side.

My B+ son is even more of a mutt than I am.  His Father was Ĺ Swedish and Ĺ Arian German.  My sonís hair is brown but when he gets out in the sun it turns almost blond.  He had blond hair when he was a child.  His eyes are blue.  His father was blond haired & blue eyed.  We know nothing of his ancestry.  His Fatherís dead, so unless he decides to do some research later on in life, we wonít know.


I am B- NON-Sec Explorer; my son is B+ SEC Nomad; my Mother was O+; and my Father was AB-
SWAMI Thanksgiving present 2008
Revised from Arlene B- NonSec to RedLilac on 3/31/06
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TJ
Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 2:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,486
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Location: Midvale, UT, USA
Age: 39
I haven't gotten into family history myself, but my mother and her father were big into it.  Grampa did genealogical research for other people (for hire).  My B gene comes from dad's side, and there isn't nearly as much of the family history work done on his side.  One of these days I want to get into it myself, but I just can't get motivated right now.
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 7:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,647
Gender: Female
Location: Denmark
Age: 42
Bīs are pretty common in  Eastern Europe......

My grandmother( Type B) on my dad side -had Ukraine/ East German ancestors (Great Great grandparents - and we always joked that my dad ( AB) looked like a real Cossack ( Dark hair -very blue eyes- the way he walked )
while my Mothers family( all Oīs)  are mainly Danish; Norwegian, and something else that I forgot.

I havenīt used much time with my own family- but I have used a lot of time on my step dads family
He is born in USA - and there was so many tales about his past that I decided to use my Historian background - and it was really interesting what we found out.

His mother had always told him that is fathers family was jewish and came from Prussia ( the Eastern part of Germany- well the actually came from Rhineland - and was not jewish at least not in 1670   - so sometimes a little thing gets completely messed up- it I always wise to find to independent sources that tells the same story  


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
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Maldo
Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 9:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+ INTJ
Autumn: Harvest, success.
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Location: New York
Age: 45
Quoted from BohemianChris
There's a passage in Deep Ancestry by Spencer Wells which is the official book for the National Geographic Genographic Study that describes how Lewontin turned preexisting ideas of genetic variation on its head by discovering, using DNA, that 85% of genetic variation occurs within groups of people, not among different nationalities of races. Also in Seven Daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes describes his controversial mitochondrial DNA finding that 80% of modern European DNA is hunter-gatherer and 20% is more recent farmer genetics.


I found Sykes Seven Daughters a great book.   Im from the South Pacific and there was some amazing insights into how the human race moved into that region and evolved...


"You're not disabled by the disabilities you have, you are able by the abilities you have." - Oscar Pistorius
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Sky
Sunday, October 5, 2008, 5:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 174
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Location: EL Centro, California
Age: 36
My dad's family is of Scandanavian descent (Knudsen/Jensen so Norway); my mom Russian (Molokon Christians, kicked out by the last Czar of Russia, Alexander). Both A's.

Growing up, I joked that I look German since that was the middle-ground people.

Now I live in the land of Mestizos (Spanish slang term for people of Mexican heritage who are a mix of European and Native American ancestries).

In college, my dorm roommate was "Black Irish," since he could tan darkly and when his brown hair grew out, would get real curly and thick. His explanation was some of the survivors of the Spanish Armada that tried to invade England included Moorish slaves, and some people had to land on Catholic Ireland to survive.
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Ribbit
Monday, October 6, 2008, 1:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 36
Knudsen?  Like the organic juice brand?


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Henriette Bsec
Monday, October 6, 2008, 8:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,647
Gender: Female
Location: Denmark
Age: 42
Quoted from Maldo


I found Sykes Seven Daughters a great book.   Im from the South Pacific and there was some amazing insights into how the human race moved into that region and evolved...


me too - facinating read  

BTW Knudsen and especially JENSEN is much more common in Denmark than in Norway  


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
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Sky
Wednesday, October 8, 2008, 3:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
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Age: 36
Yes, you are correct. I keep forgetting the Danish background.
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, October 8, 2008, 5:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,647
Gender: Female
Location: Denmark
Age: 42


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
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Ribbit
Thursday, October 23, 2008, 2:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 36
DH just told me about another circle in my family tree.  My great-grandmother married my great-grandfather on opposite sides of the family, in their old age.  It would be like if my father died and my husband's mother died, my mother marrying his father.  In a way it's sort of sweet, them having known each other for many years, but then again....."They probably weren't allowed to marry outside the church," I told DH.  DH said, "They probably weren't allowed to marry outside the family."    Now that's redneck.  Small town, podunk Alabama with a population made up of....family.  Woo-hoo!


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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RedLilac
Sunday, November 23, 2008, 4:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI tweaked Explorer Super Taster from Illinois
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,042
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Location: Lombard, Illinois (Chicago suburb)
Age: 63
My Grandfather and his 1st cousin married sisters.  If you looked at my uncle and his cousin side by side you would have thought they were brothers.  They were always very close throughout their life too.  


I am B- NON-Sec Explorer; my son is B+ SEC Nomad; my Mother was O+; and my Father was AB-
SWAMI Thanksgiving present 2008
Revised from Arlene B- NonSec to RedLilac on 3/31/06
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apositive
Monday, November 24, 2008, 10:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~ teacher ~ probably nonnie
Ee Dan
Ee Dan
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BohemianChris,  Let me get this straight . . . your father is type A and the Bohemian ancestor comes on your mother's side of the family?

I hate to break the news, but I am afraid that the current state of DNA testing will not help with the migration from Asia to Eastern Europe, etc.  But DNA studies become more and more refined and precise as time goes on.

When DNA testing was first starting up I heard a lecture about it by someone how was using mitochondrial DNA (which comes down through females only) to confirm genealogies.  The lecturer was working with New England families but he spoke about a researcher in Great Britain (I don't know whether it was Skyes or someone else) who had found one woman who had Great Britain ancestry confirmed centuries back (most can go back to about 1600, provided the church or town hall holding their records was not bombed in WWII) - well, the woman's her mitochondrial DNA was completely atypical of Great Britain but was completely typical of women in the Near East.  So, that blood type B just might have travelled back from the Crusades to England and was passed down to you.  Who knows?


INTJ
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BohemianChris
Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 6:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
The B blood type comes from my maternal grandpa John Sykora. His parents came directly from Bohemia, though I do have some English blood on the paternal side of my maternal grandma Annabelle's side (Prince). Ultimately, the mitochodrial DNA testing would trace the French-Canadian side of her family. Two questions I have are "Were there any native American women in this maternal line since my ancestors were in Canada since the 1700's?" and "If my French ancestors are from Normandy, do they have Celtic blood?"

I think there's inbreeding in every family. Like my maternal great great grandma married her uncle. Life on the frontier may have really limited the gene pool


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Ribbit
Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 1:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 36
I just found out I have Cherokee Indian blood on my mom's mom's mom's (I'm not sure how many yet) side.  So I carry Cherokee mitochondria.  We overheard my mom's cousin mention it at my grandmother's funeral yesterday and nobody (not my mom or her siblings) knew it.  So my husband, who is the family historian, got in touch with that cousin for specifics.  Pretty cool, huh?  And nobody knew!


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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BohemianChris
Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 1:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 86
Gender: Male
Location: Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, USA
That's very cool, Ribbit. I think most Americans have a story or two about native American blood in their family, but aren't necessarily able to prove it. Maybe some of the stories are true and others are mythologies created to help connect us to this country on a spiritual level. Perhaps the mitochondrial DNA is the ultimate authority, but there are also some pretty good written records in archives and churches. I've been surprised by some of my family heritage, but never disappointed.

-Chris


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Judy
Friday, April 3, 2009, 1:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-
Early Spring: Awareness, desire.
Posts: 29
Gender: Female
Location: NW Georgia, USA
Age: 48
Yes, I've researched my genealogy, and I'm still researching.  I'm about as much of a mutt as a person can be.  Besides having Native American ancestry (both Creek and Cherokee), I have ancestors from all over Europe and the Middle East.  However, it seems that all of my ancestors came into the US quite early.  I haven't yet found any that got here after the 1700s, and many were here before that.
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Judy
Friday, April 3, 2009, 1:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-
Early Spring: Awareness, desire.
Posts: 29
Gender: Female
Location: NW Georgia, USA
Age: 48
Quoted from Ribbit
I just found out I have Cherokee Indian blood on my mom's mom's mom's (I'm not sure how many yet) side.  So I carry Cherokee mitochondria.  We overheard my mom's cousin mention it at my grandmother's funeral yesterday and nobody (not my mom or her siblings) knew it.  So my husband, who is the family historian, got in touch with that cousin for specifics.  Pretty cool, huh?  And nobody knew!

That is cool.   I already knew that I had Cherokee ancestry, but I had no idea that I had Creek until I started working on my family tree.  Based on the looks of my family, I suspect there's still more to find.

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Ribbit
Saturday, April 4, 2009, 3:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,156
Gender: Female
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Age: 36
Ha.  Based on my looks you'd think purely northern European.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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