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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  Psychic shock/trauma, cortisol/adrenaline, & diet
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Psychic shock/trauma, cortisol/adrenaline, & diet  This thread currently has 4,740 views. Print Print Thread
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Curious
Friday, December 28, 2007, 12:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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PT, your post has been very clear to me.
I agree on the rescue remedy, it is great stuff.
If a disturbing event happens and this event triggers a strong emotion, my psychologist receommended 'just sit with it'.
To explain what I mean by this (or what she means by this), here is a quote "Just don't move. Let yourself be completely present to the emotion. Welcome it. If a negative emotion arises, don't run away from it; don't run off to the refrigerator to eat some food to cover it up; don't turn on the television to distract yourself from it; don't call your friends to disperse its energy by gossiping about it. Just stop and FEEL it. Just let yourself be PRESENT to it. You'll find if you don't try to distract yourself from it, or push it away, or, worse still dump it on someone else; if you STAY STILL, if you are really PRESENT to it - in the very core of the feeling you will find peace. So when you feel a powerful emotion, just let it be - don't move. Weldome it." The quote is from Brandon Bays book "the journey", p. 54.
I have tried it and it has worked wonders for me.
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Kristin
Friday, December 28, 2007, 12:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think when you are reeling from something shocking, and then it turns out not to be true, it is something like a double whammy for your body as it produces one huge physiological response to the shock, and then another response to the relief. Both are taxing in their own way. I am thinking about a friend of mine in college who's father got a call to come identify her body down at the morgue in the middle of the night. Obviously, it turned out not to be her body at the morgue... but can you imagine being woken out of a sound sleep to such devastating news, preparing your heart, mind and soul to face such a tragedy... and then the enormous relief at it not being true? Wonderful ending, yes... but still traumatic!

I would do like some of the others... time alone moving, and breathing, and being by myself. Soothing teas and warm drinks often provide that comfy feeling too... hanging out with friends... whatever I would find relaxing. Rescue remedy has been very helpful for me when other methods provide little relief. And I would watch for signs of imbalance establishing down the road....


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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TJ
Friday, December 28, 2007, 1:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Whimsical
No worries, I think people can follow the evolving thread.


I'm sure that every thread on the forum that has more than 1 page has evolved...

I feel you PT, sometimes you have to talk for a while before you finally find the right words to say what you mean!
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Victoria
Friday, December 28, 2007, 2:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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PT, you could do a little test on the effectiveness of rescue remedy by trying it.  

I have used it for 20 years on my family at times when one of them (such as one of the kids) was having an emotional melt-down.  I found it to calm them by the second dose (5 minutes apart).  These tests convinced me because they did not know they were being treated with the R.R.  I would just put a few drops in whatever they were drinking.  

When I take it, I feel the calming effects instantly.  My heart rate slows, breathing becomes deeper, and the feeling of panic dissipates.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Whimsical
Friday, December 28, 2007, 3:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto
Kyosha Nim
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The first time I tried Rescue Remedy was when I was going through a very emotionally crazy time in my life.  I saw the box in a store and on the box it said "to comfort & reassure".  Those were exactly what I needed!  So even though at that time I thought anything homeopathic was c**p, I bought it, thinking that it was worth trying for the price.  At the very least, any sort of placebo effect would be worth it if it made any difference in how I felt.

If I am stressed or sad or whatever, I have a lot of trouble at night and usually cannot sleep.  I took Rescue Remedy in water before bed and found myself feeling peaceful and serene before bed and fell asleep with no problem!  My problems were the same, but I felt like I could find some inner peace from them...  I was truly amazed.  

That was my first experience with anything even resembling homeopathy and I have since seen homeopathic medicine used to achieve unbelievable things on myself, other people, and even pets.  When you see a major shift in an animal, you know this is for real.  Now homeopathy is a major interest for me and will likely be a major part of my practice when I am an ND.


MIFHI E-185
Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Ribbit
Friday, December 28, 2007, 4:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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We use RR a lot too.  If I were having trouble winding down from a sudden stressful situation, I think I'd down a few drops of RR and "live in the moment," as Curious suggested.  A benefit to feeling it when it's there, fully, and welcoming it as reality (even if you find out later it's not), is that you don't have to deal with it later.  When you squelch stress it goes chronic and then years later the issue pops back up and you have to deal with it emotionally then.  Better to deal with it when it happens.  I know ...  of what....I speak.

I used RR last night.  My husband got his second round of the stomach virus we've been dealing with (it came it two parts for everybody except me).  He was shaking so bad with the fever that it was beginning to scare me.  I took his temp and it was only 100.8.  Good grief, I thought.  Why's he doing this?  100.8 is no big deal.  Then I realized maybe he was shivering because it was going up so fast, not because it was high.  Anyway, I looked through my cabinet to see what was there, and I found RR and Feverfew tincture.  I mixed up a concoction and made him drink it.  Within minutes he stopped shaking, started breathing normally, stopped saying over and over that he was freezing, and eventually he went to sleep.  Amazing stuff.  He even kept down his dinner (lamburgers, sweet potatoes and steamed broccoli).

When my son was born (at home with a midwife), he showed some stress, evidenced by rapid breathing.  (And no wonder he was stressed--he got stuck at the shoulders for a few more minutes than was good for him--and no wonder he was stuck at the shoulders--he was a huge, 10 lbs. 5 oz., barrel-chested baby).  My midwife gave him a few drops of RR and his respirations immediately became normal.

I know stress.  I know chronic stress mostly.  (Ah, the things families can do to us.)  But just recently I found out a guy I knew growing up left the same religious cult I left 6 years ago.  I found out on a Friday night.  I knew I wouldn't be able to contact him until Monday.  On Saturday morning I began experiencing the exact same (exept more extreme, strangely) physical symptoms that I experienced when I left.  It was like I was leaving all over again.  The fear, the paranoia of them coming after me, knowing they were trying to find me, knowing what they were saying about me, knowing the lies they'd make up, knowing I was losing my entire family...talk about adrenaline and cortisol!  I made myself so sick worrying about this guy that I came down with a migraine, I vomited, and my legs started aching.  (When my chiropractor adjusted me a few days later she felt my neck and said, "Hm.  Rough weekend?")  We're now e-mailing each other, and I'm trying to encourage him as gently as I can to remain an ex-member and not panic and go back, even though his family has shunned him.  

Well, I didn't mean to go into all that.  I just wanted to say that when I get uptight about something, I use RR to calm myself.  It's not just psychological--I use it on my children too.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 1:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Amazone I.
I guess here the real problem might be catecholamines ...not anything else ----laaaaa.....  and pr-menopausal issues

Isa, I'll try to clarify one last time as to the intended topic of this thread/discussion:  it is not to do with perimenapause, ongoing stress, depression, hormone imbalance or anything like that.  It is specifically about just how Kate (Whimsical) posted that she took it, as well as several other participants in the thread who do grok the topic:  it is about "tips, tricks and tonics" (as this one guy always says on a gardening show on PBS) to attempt to stay on track with diet when one's brain has released a ton of adrenaline and/or cortisol into one's body due to a crisis, emergency and/or trauma type event.  Such an extreme influx of stress hormones is functional if one needs to run away from a bear or even go to a hospital emergency room with a loved one and stay up all night, or keep oneself alive when one's car plunged into a ditch at night, etc.  Adrenaline and cortisol do serve a purpose, that is why our bodies evolved to release them into our systems in certain situations.  But if you have such an influx of hormones and then you don't DO something with them, the challenge then becomes clearing them out of your system because, as Dr. Nicholas Perricone says, they are "bad actors" in the system.  They wreck havoc and cause a lot of damage.  They only belong in our bodies for short periods of time when we need a burst of energy, focus, etc.  When they stick around longer than needed, they become the aforementioned "bad actors".  The very best and most effective way to try to clear them out is via aerobic exercise and/or exercise such as yoga, all depending on your type.  This thread is about specific suggestions and insights on exercises, foods and supplements to keep one from being totally derailed by such an event, and to get one back on track if one is knocked completely off the rails.

Victoria, is "holy basil" the regular type of fresh basil one can buy at most stores?  I meant to ask yesterday but had to spend so much time explaining the nature of the topic that I didn't have time.  Speaking of time, gotta go, work is shaping up to be wacky today, but I'll be back later.



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 1:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Kristin
I think when you are reeling from something shocking, and then it turns out not to be true, it is something like a double whammy for your body as it produces one huge physiological response to the shock, and then another response to the relief. Both are taxing in their own way. I am thinking about a friend of mine in college who's father got a call to come identify her body down at the morgue in the middle of the night. Obviously, it turned out not to be her body at the morgue... but can you imagine being woken out of a sound sleep to such devastating news, preparing your heart, mind and soul to face such a tragedy... and then the enormous relief at it not being true? Wonderful ending, yes... but still traumatic!

This was very much the dynamic of the specific situation I'm talking about, almost to the letter.



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 2:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Curious
PT, your post has been very clear to me.
I agree on the rescue remedy, it is great stuff.
If a disturbing event happens and this event triggers a strong emotion, my psychologist receommended 'just sit with it'.
To explain what I mean by this (or what she means by this), here is a quote "Just don't move. Let yourself be completely present to the emotion. Welcome it. If a negative emotion arises, don't run away from it; don't run off to the refrigerator to eat some food to cover it up; don't turn on the television to distract yourself from it; don't call your friends to disperse its energy by gossiping about it. Just stop and FEEL it. Just let yourself be PRESENT to it.

This is excellent, very wise advice.  As kk (kimonokat of this forum) once said to me years ago "be comfortable with your discomfort".  Just let.  This is hard for me on a good day, let alone in a traumatic situation, yet so important to processing it in a healthy, healing way.

I have tried to do that, and also tried the equally important business of consciously "IMing my brain" with the message that things are okay, so that hopefully I can help redirect my brain from crisis mode, from stress-hormone dumping mode, into baseline, relatively calm (!) mode.  I mean, my baseline is a stressed-out, anxious person (what?  no?  you, PT?), but that is a seperate issue *lol*!  There is a big difference between ongoing stress and a shock and awe event.

The shock and awe event did throw me for a loop, completely off track, where I had only been back for about a week and I was lovin' it!!!!  I think I might--might--have been okay, dietwise, had the next day not been Christmas and I found myself surrounded by all these tempting avoids where I was.  But I can't blame Christmas, it was just as the quote in this post describes, I was trying to avoid feeling the experience by eating comfort foods.  And not good, nourishing, BTD comfort foods like homemade soup or stew or something, no, I'm talking baaaaaaahd junk.  Once adrenaline and cortisol is cursing through your system, not to mention the emotional component of it all, if that stuff is available and you are the type of person to turn to it for comfort, it is pretty much a fate accompli.  I don't beat myself up too much for that, but I am trying the slow climb out to get back on track.

So, what have we learned thus far (because I gotta go yet again--the thing I left to do earlier had to be put off for about half an hour, but now it is getting about that time)?  Well, here's my thinking on coping with adrenaline/cortisol, as well as the emotional components of a crisis situation, once the crisis abates:

1.  EXERCISE.  This is one sure way to clear out the stress hormones before they can do their worst in your system.

2.  Talk to your brain.  Sounds silly at best and insane at worst *lol*, but telling yourself clearly and simply that things are okay, etc., can really help.

3.  Allow yourself to feel the difficult stuff.  Just let.  Let the feelings flow in and out of you like the ocean tides, knowing you can't control them and don't need to try.  Accept the feelings as they come and go.  They don't need to be rational or make sense, either.  They are feelings.  Let.  Accept.

4.  Numbers 2 and 3 are not in conflict.  You can tell yourself all is well without judging yourself if you feel bad or sad, shaken up, etc.  You can tell yourself all is well in a loving, accepting way, that still allows for the free flow of any and all feelings that come.

5.  Eat right for your type!  FAR easier said than done at a time like that, but do try.

6.  Okay, what specific supplements and remedies are we liking as a group in this thread?  Rescue Remedy seems VERY big with the BTD crowd!  And on the strength of your recommendations and points you've made, I'm actually thinking of shelling out for this stuff again.  But I'm still very skeptical...still, Don made a great point about water remembering "energy signatures" and everyone else has personally attested to how effective this stuff is.  The point about how witnessing it work in pets is impressive does seem valid, although the alcohol content alone could be calming to the pet, no?  I don't know, I honestly don't.  On the one hand, the personal testimonials to this stuff are extremely impressive.  On the other hand, the whole theory behind it, honestly, I just am very skeptical about.  But I gotta go again versus elaborate because I just got a call that the computer I need is ready for me.  So, real quick, specific foods and supplements suggested to this point are:  holy basil, Rescue Remedy (a Bach Flower Essence), Catechol, Rhodiola...and I'm probably leaving stuff out, but later guys!  Great thread, I'm glad you guys get the topic, because I think it is an important one.  I am so with Perricone that stress hormones are "bad actors" (love that term, it is so apt and comprehensive) in the body unless you really do happen to be being chased by a bear for ten miles, or you need to lift a Mack truck off a toddler, or whatever.  At such times, adrenaline is truly a gift from God.  And, bless our brains, when they "release the hounds", they think it is such a situation and they are only trying to help, only doing their jobs.  So then it becomes our jobs to help the brain and body calm down, let go, let in, let out, and heal from such a sitch.

GOT to go, sorry my posts have been so rushy-rushy in this thread because I do think the topic deserves thoughtful responses, yet TIME seems to be in short supply today.  Later, dudes.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Rodney
Friday, December 28, 2007, 2:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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As I think GCG said Yoga!
I practice yoga everyday and since it is now an everyday thing in my life I forget the benefits since they are with me all the time {like breathing.. ya don't have to tell yourself to do it it comes natural}
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/yoga/MM00650
forward bends and downward facing dog are some of my favorites, they allow more circulation to the thyroid and brain among other organs. Once you get in the practice of yoga you will always have that friend to fall back on and take control of you mind and body. My 2 cents for the day.
{btw a few years ago we had some REAL BAD news come to our front door on the 4 of July I picked up some paints and painted a huge mural on the side of my house, my niece is still gone but I did something [vented] with the anger and hurt from her death}
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gulfcoastguy
Friday, December 28, 2007, 3:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
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If you have the time and  a little privacy here is a little chi kung exercise. Stand with your feet shoulder distance apart and the toes facing slightly inward, let the knees be slightly bent. As you breath in slowly though the nose raise your hand in time with the inhale palm upto chest high. Then exhale out the mouth pushing your hands palm out away from your chest. Inhale bringing your hands back to the chest. It is natural to rise a little higher when inhaling and sink a little lower when exhaling. Exhale slowly pushing your hands palm down. Repeat this cycle. After the first couple of cycles imagine inhaling blue or green light/energy down into your diaphram and exhaling toxic black smoke/stress up your lungs and out your hands. When you feel calm , sense your shoulders, if they are hunched high and forward lift them higher then sit them back down lower and back.
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 4:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Ribbit
I know stress.  I know chronic stress mostly.  (Ah, the things families can do to us.)

Word up.  As drive55 would say, "I feel you".  A lot of the ideas in this thread would be helpful for chronic, ongoing stress, too.  In fact, we are designed to be able to cope well with short bursts of stress, but it is the ongoing stress that is the killer, especially when we have hormones like cortisol floatin' around in us at elevated levels on a regular basis.  I think I have that, big time.  And while this topic is really focused on eradicating the extreme bursts of those hormones that infuse your system in a traumatic situation, you could certainly apply basically all of it to alleviating chronic stress as well.

I know I need to pay more attention, focus and action into stress-busting strategies and protocols.

What has been rough for me with this situation is as Victoria describes, the gear shifting.  One minute, I'm settling in to enjoy a much-needed holiday, tuning in one of my two fave movies of all time, "It's a Wonderful Life", and snuggling under a quilt with a kitty I didn't think would still be here for Christmas, looking forward to the next day and spending it visiting friends and then hanging with my mom, relaxing and counting blessings.  The next minute, there is a knock at the door and I found myself confronted with a horrible crisis, thinking it was my loved one injured or dead.  And that is the short version, but it was something to then find out, no, it's not her, but it is SOMEONE and its awful, but now we're all just supposed to forget it and have a merry Christmas?  I'm not wired that way.

So, I like the advice about just letting yourself feel what you feel, even if it is upsetting.  Let yourself be upset.  At the same time, it is good to remind yourself that it is okay now, etc.

I'm thinking another good thing besides all the above great ideas would be to get a good massage.  I'm talking deep tissue here!  That will physically "break up" and release a lot of the stress that actually settles in and makes itself at home in your body.

Gotta go AGAIN, sorry.  I keep reading and responding to this thread in dribs and drabs.  I'm off to get a jackfruit shake at the Vietnamese place, as I decided recently that jackfruit is da bomb.  Later, dudes.



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist  -  Friday, December 28, 2007, 5:01pm
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jayneeo
Friday, December 28, 2007, 5:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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P,T. your situation sounds so upsetting. Good suggestions, though. So glad it was only a false alarm...(for you, anyway)
And Ribbit, I can't help responding to your sharing...you are very brave!!! God bless you!
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Victoria
Friday, December 28, 2007, 5:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Holy basil is not culinary basil.  It is a relative, called Tulsi, native to India, and perhaps other countries of similiar climate.  You can find supplements in the health food store.  Teas are available, but not strong enough, in my opinion, to be of much therapeutic value.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Rodney
Friday, December 28, 2007, 5:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Another way I was told to get rid of unwanted thoughts and stress was to:
on a full moon night at midnight
go to a secluded place, preferably a hill or high place.
YELL and SCREAM ALL OF WHAT IS BOTTLED UP and bothering you.




it works

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 6:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 11,139
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Quoted from jayneeo
P,T. your situation sounds so upsetting.

It so was.  That's why for once I'm not going into detail, because just for once I've decided to spare you all some drama.  I wish I would have spared myself this particular drama by NOT opening the front door.  THAT is the moral of this story:  NEVER open your door.  If I hadn't, everything would have been just FINE and I wouldn't be haunted by the victim of this horrible scene.  I would have watched "It's a Wonderful Life" as planned and commenced a relaxing, grateful, rejuventating, warm holiday.  But since it was Christmas Eve, and earlier a neighbor child had stopped over with a gift card to, where else, the HFS (how well they know me *lol*), I thought, okay, let's see who's at the door.  No doubt someone wishing me good holiday cheer and bearing egg nog or something.

Wrong.  Again, never answer your front door.  No good can come of it.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 6:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 11,139
Gender: Female
Location: Florida
Age: 53
Quoted from Rodney
Another way I was told to get rid of unwanted thoughts and stress was to:  on a full moon night at midnight
go to a secluded place, preferably a hill or high place.
YELL and SCREAM ALL OF WHAT IS BOTTLED UP and bothering you.

it works

Primal scream therapy is always a winner!  Great suggestion, Rodney!  And the full moon couldn't hurt, either, though I had never heard that was a requisite!


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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TJ
Friday, December 28, 2007, 8:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Peppermint Twist
Again, never answer your front door.  No good can come of it.


Now if you were a good southerner, you'd have already known that decent people always come to your side or back door, and that would have saved you a lot of grief!
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 8:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Victoria
The herb Holy Basil (Tulsi) is useful for clearing excessive cortisol.  I'm not sure what the effect would be on adrenaline.  

And this is not BTD related, but a bottle of rescue remedy is the fastest thing I know of to quickly normalize that fight or flight state in a crises (whether real or imagined).

Okay, girl, I've decided I'm definitely going to get the supplement Holy Basil, if they have it at the HFS.  The supplement pup there is SO good.  He'll steer me correctly.  As for the Rescue Remedy, I can't believe I'm even toying with buying that!  I bought it once long about 2001 for the dog but never gave it to her once I opened it and realized it was, or seemed to me at the time anyway, to be nothing but alcohol, and very expensive alcohol at that.  I ended up throwing it out in disgust.

But you and Brig and Kate and everyone are all so positive about how great it is, that it does give me pause, as you are all very intelligent, wise peeps.  I just might get myself another one.  But the holy basil, definitely is getting purchased.  ...Well, let's see the price first, but very probably.  I don't say definitely because everything has gone up SO much!!!



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 9:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 11,139
Gender: Female
Location: Florida
Age: 53
Quoted from TJ


Now if you were a good southerner, you'd have already known that decent people always come to your side or back door, and that would have saved you a lot of grief!

Okay, you just cleared up a mystery for me!!!  My friend, Stan, always comes into the backyard and scares the living daylights outta me when he taps on the french doors, as the backyard is fenced and he has to go through (or OVER in his case--he is very tall and just steps OVER my three-foot fence!) a hurdle to get there.  He grew up in Florida.  That explains so much, I should have known it would explain his propensity for going to the back door, too!!!

Southerners are a mystery to me.  But, I figure (or, should I say, I reckon?   ), I've got a BA in cultural-anthropology, I should be able to study them and understand their exotic ways *lol*!!!


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, December 28, 2007, 9:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 11,139
Gender: Female
Location: Florida
Age: 53
P.S.  By the way, drive, are you originally from Richmond?  Because I grew up not too far north of you, in the Maryland burbs of DC.  But that Mason-Dixon line is truly the cultural divide between north and south, isn't it?!  Whew doggies, I set one toe from MD into Virginia and I fell like I've hit the deeeeeeeeeeeeeEEEEEEP south!  Wild, wild stuff.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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honeybee
Friday, December 28, 2007, 10:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INTJ
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,042
Gender: Female
Location: au
three responses i can remember from the last 3 situations of high-cortisol / adrenaline / shock; (..eating seems to be the last thing i want in such states.)

1. drinking glass after glass of water. with sea salt. literally, it was all i could think to do after receiving some dream-breaking news on the telephone -and being alone really helped -couldnt think of anything worse than facing someone and them asking what was wrong. I have never been able to drink so much water in my life, i felt it was what i needed.
I kept up the extra water drinking for the whole week, it seemed to help!? It also made my skin glow..?! and someohow that made me better prepared for the second stage unfolding of said situation.

2. swimming!!! I swam a kilometre when i was reeling from a 'surprise' break-up, it was a really great way to clear the mind and body, combined with extra yoga classes that entire year. swimming is an awesome release, try it!!

3. nothing. Most recent psychic shock was just this last weekend..and besides helping best i could, i felt very calm and sure of what i had to do, it was the aftershock that was difficult to deal with, talking about it with the other people who were involved helped, but i felt shaken for days. I had the rescue remedy, but in the moment it didnt get my second thought. i wish i had of thought of it for the person involved. and myself!
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C_Sharp
Friday, December 28, 2007, 10:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher Rh+ Lewis: a+b-, NN,Taster
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
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Gender: Male
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Age: 54
I wish I had a magic solution.

I do keep a supplement mixture on hand to lower cortisol
(a number of these herbs have already been mentioned)


    Vitamin C
    Chromium
    Vanadium  
    Magnolia Bark Extract (Magnolia officinalis)
    Phellodendron Bark Extract (Phellodendron amurense),
    Holy Basil Leaves Extract (Ocimum sanctum ursolic acid),
    Green Tea Extract (Camellia sinensis),  
    l-theanine (Suntheanine),
    DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone)  
    Banaba Leaf (Laegerstromia speciosa corosolic acid)

---

Alternative nostril breathing helps me more than the herbs.
Although if the shock/terror is too great sometimes I have trouble getting myself calmed down enough to do the alternative nostril breathing.

I hope that my suggestions come too late for you PT.

For me it is horrible to be in a place where we are so emotional freaked out that one cannot calm down enough to do relaxation exercises. I hear that there are some drugs to knock oneself back inline, but I am not comfortable enough with them to use them.  


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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TJ
Saturday, December 29, 2007, 12:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

54% Nomad
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,486
Gender: Male
Location: Midvale, UT, USA
Age: 40
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
P.S.  By the way, drive, are you originally from Richmond?  Because I grew up not too far north of you, in the Maryland burbs of DC.  But that Mason-Dixon line is truly the cultural divide between north and south, isn't it?!  Whew doggies, I set one toe from MD into Virginia and I fell like I've hit the deeeeeeeeeeeeeEEEEEEP south!  Wild, wild stuff.


Nope, I moved here on a whim back in February (see, I told you I'm a Nomad!).  I'm from eastern North Carolina, a little rinky-dink spot in the road called Pollocksville, population <1000.  I agree, there's a big difference between MD and VA, the Mason-Dixon line pretty clearly runs along that border!

You should know that y'all yanks can be quite a cultural mystery to us also!  FYI, if you aren't in the Florida panhandle, you're not really in the South; the peninsula is just an annex of New England!
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Curious
Saturday, December 29, 2007, 12:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+
Ee Dan
Posts: 744
Gender: Female
Location: Australia
PT, this is another push for you to try the Rescue Remedy. I usually don't react to homeopatics (they just don't do anything for me), but Rescue Remedy works for me - it calms me down in an instant.
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Live Right 4 Your Type  ›  Psychic shock/trauma, cortisol/adrenaline, & diet

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