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misspudding
Wednesday, July 30, 2014, 6:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Check this out.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/next/body/epigenetics-abuse/

Obviously, if childhood abuse can turn genes on or off, imagine what food or drugs or supplements or exercise can do?

Epigenetics blows my mind!!!




misspudding

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Averno
Wednesday, July 30, 2014, 7:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you for this, misspudding. Really encouraging work.

Quoted Text
Normally, cortisol molecules dock in receptors that are coded for by NR3C1 in the brain and white blood cells, which signals the body to calm down and return to its normal operating mode, and revives the immune system. But if NR3C1 is methylated, the body won’t be able to produce enough receptors, hobbling its ability to regulate stress. The body can still produce cortisol, but without enough receptors, Pollak says, there’s nothing to reign in the heightened state. “It’s the brake that’s not working.”

When the body can’t signal itself to calm down, the short term results are kids who, Pollak says, are “on alert all the time.” They often misinterpret innocent behavior as threatening; they can be aggressive, and they struggle with change.

Fortunately for abused children, there’s reason for hope. Szyf’s experiments in rats suggests that NR3C1 isn’t necessarily permanently silenced: when the abused pups were returned to nurturing mothers, the extra methylation disappeared. “The idea that these things aren’t fixed is really encouraging,” Pollak says.


Looks like the physical and metaphysical are intersecting after all, as Bruce Lipton postulates here:

http://www.terapiasesenciales.com/images/7_mind-over-genes-the-new-biology.pdf


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misspudding
Wednesday, July 30, 2014, 11:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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They indicated that when children are placed in a different, nurturing environment, the methylation disappeared. Wonder if that's true for adults who were raised in an abusive childhood?

Obviously, we can change our gene expression through what we eat and expose ourselves to as adults, but I'm very curious about the psychological stuff. I had a very stressful childhood (parents fought all of the time and were verbally abusive, and it was frightening). I've done a lot of therapy since then and overcame a lot of the bad stuff, by my stress response is still hair trigger.

Thankfully, I just gave up coffee. Woohoo! That should help. Haha.




misspudding

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susanC
Thursday, July 31, 2014, 5:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for the two for great links.  


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Amazone I.
Thursday, July 31, 2014, 6:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think ...this is it..why Bruce Lipton always mentiones: mind over genes.....
and also P.D. revealed it in his beautiful work.........

upcoming therapists should learn how to work onto diff. levels at the same time... exactly the way P.D. is exercing it since decades ..... but helas... here in CH-landly they still agree with *specialismes*  and boring unidiversification instead getting global .... .....

True artwork in healings is *only* to get adjusted involved patterns and body-mind-epigenetic levels -entre-autre...........called- multy-level-task...


MIfHI K-174
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Easy E
Thursday, July 31, 2014, 2:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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This is why trauma can be devastating and can carry on and on if it isn't dealt with.  I am a counselor and see long term effects of trauma, or at least did so more when working on the mental health side of it.  

I am doing addictions counseling now, working with opiate addiction.  Often the onset of opiate use came from a prescription for pain killers after an injury.  There is often emotional aspects that coincide with addiction too, as well as a strong biological aspect.  Maybe they work together.

I believe qigong and tai chi with the right herbs can heal addiction and trauma.  The trauma is imbedded in the cells of the body.  And praying!
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misspudding
Thursday, July 31, 2014, 7:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Indeed. I struggle with getting addicted to things like alcohol. I'm pretty good at reigning myself in when I see it getting bad (like this last week, I was incredibly stressed out early in the week, and I just trying "needed" wine). I really don't feel like I can handle it anymore and am considering becoming a teetotaler. I wonder how much of my need to drink that is from my chaotic upbringing.




misspudding

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Mrs T O+
Friday, August 1, 2014, 2:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Most alcohol is bad for Os, so maybe quitting drinking might help. Try it for a few months & see what happens.


Interested in nutrition, lactation, religion, politics; love to be around people; talkative, sensitive, goofy; a "fishy Christian" ><>; left-handed; lived on a farm, small town & big city; love BTD/GTD; A staunch La Leche League veteran; b. 10/1947 Check BTD/GTD on facebook!
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misspudding
Friday, August 1, 2014, 8:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm an explorer and have a gene for clotting. Red wine is a neutral (at least on my son's SWAMI, and he and are pretty much the same...O negative, we're both almost certainly nonnies based on everything I've read).

There's a line in the GTD book, if I recall, that says something like there's a paradox in that the people who need red wine the most are those are the most likely to get addicted to it. Pretty sure it's in the explorer profile. That's totally me.

I've pulled it out of my diet right now since I can't afford it and if I don't buy it for a few days (thanks, dopamine), I can usually stop drinking it for a while. I'm hoping to stop drinking completely for a few months and reset myself. Hopefully that helps.




misspudding

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Chloe
Friday, August 1, 2014, 9:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from misspudding
if I recall, that says something like there's a paradox in that the people who need red wine the most are those are the most likely to get addicted to it. Pretty sure it's in the explorer profile.


WOW, this sounds like my sister who drinks a lot of red wine. She and her husband share a bottle
every night or maybe more than a bottle..  I don't know if this amount of wine is considered an addiction, but a day doesn't go by that she isn't drinking red wine every night. So the habit of drinking every might might seem to be an addiction, but I think many people drink wine every night as well.   Yet, I don't think my sister is an Explorer.  She's right handed and although she does have that Explorer characteristic of "I'll do it my way", other than that, she looks just like a Teacher, blood type is A and clearly has the visible wrist tendons that are so typical of Teachers.. (of which I do not have)  I'm wondering if all this red wine has helped her avoid the known health risks related to being a smoker.

Personally, I don't like alcohol of any kind, don't like how sleepy I get from wine, and can't see how I could ever become addicted because I'd be fast asleep before I could ever finish drinking one glass. I start yawning after the first sip.  I honestly feel the sulphites in wine get to me...even
organic red wine puts me to sleep.




"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"

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ruthiegirl
Friday, August 1, 2014, 10:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I personally can't imagine having more than one glass a day. I remember my late father in law used to have half a glass of red wine with lunch and another half glass with dinner, on the advice of his cardiologist. I don't know his blood type, as he passed away long before I'd heard of BTD, and the topic never came up.

Interesting article. It's clear that epigenetics is about more than just food, even though epigenetic nutrition is Dr D's focus.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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susanC
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Here's a case for silent (unexpressed) genes.  I have the gene for substance addiction, but I have never liked feeling high, so even moderate drinking has never worked for me.  I do love red wine in particular and will enjoy a glass occasionally, when it agrees with my system.  Sometimes it does--sometimes not.  Sometimes a sip or two can make me feel slightly light-headed, and when that happens that's the end of my drinking for that evening.  I'm a real lightweight for sure.

So--even though I have two copies of the addition gene--not even tempted.  

Looking at a pretty crappy genetic profile I'd like to think that many of my other baddie genes will be unexpressed as well.
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Kumar
Sunday, August 3, 2014, 9:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks misspudding for sharing this. Really and excellent report!



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Spring
Sunday, August 3, 2014, 8:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I agree that these are great links! I had a very protective father, who worked very hard at making us aware of anything that might harm us. It had the effect of creating a high state of alert in me even though it did not effect my siblings quite that way. At least not as severely. Thankfully, there is quite a bit of help out there for people once they figure out what they need. But tying that in with nourishing the body at the same time was something I figured out at a young age not having a clue about how fundamental such a thing was! Or how foreign it was to most people my age! I think I got that from my mother. She was always thinking outside the box.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Spring
Sunday, August 3, 2014, 8:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ruthie, from my reading I feel that Dr. D has spent a good part of his life focusing on other things besides food, wouldn't you  think so?  


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Easy E
Monday, August 4, 2014, 3:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from misspudding
I'm an explorer and have a gene for clotting. Red wine is a neutral (at least on my son's SWAMI, and he and are pretty much the same...O negative, we're both almost certainly nonnies based on everything I've read).

There's a line in the GTD book, if I recall, that says something like there's a paradox in that the people who need red wine the most are those are the most likely to get addicted to it. Pretty sure it's in the explorer profile. That's totally me.

I've pulled it out of my diet right now since I can't afford it and if I don't buy it for a few days (thanks, dopamine), I can usually stop drinking it for a while. I'm hoping to stop drinking completely for a few months and reset myself. Hopefully that helps.


Alcohol like wine or beer is more beneficial for non secretors.  I find a good beer rejuvinating, even two or three sometimes.  But I dont need it or have to have it.  I have a beer or two about four nights a week.
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paul clucas
Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 12:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Easy E
This is why trauma can be devastating and can carry on and on if it isn't dealt with.  I am a counselor and see long term effects of trauma, or at least did so more when working on the mental health side of it.  

I am doing addictions counseling now, working with opiate addiction.  Often the onset of opiate use came from a prescription for pain killers after an injury.  There is often emotional aspects that coincide with addiction too, as well as a strong biological aspect.  Maybe they work together.

I believe qigong and tai chi with the right herbs can heal addiction and trauma.  The trauma is imbedded in the cells of the body.  And praying!
Epigenetics modify the gene expression in each cell of the body, so epigenetic damage does definitely happen this way.  I know a man who got diabetes from the trauma of being thrown from his bike.  Diabetes seems to come in different degrees of seriousness which might depend on the location and extent of the trauma.



My weight loss goal: 220 lbs.  A 6'4" dyslexic oddball: the size of a line-backer, the silhouette of Winnie-the-Pooh.
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paul clucas
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Quoted from misspudding
I'm an explorer and have a gene for clotting. Red wine is a neutral (at least on my son's SWAMI, and he and are pretty much the same...O negative, we're both almost certainly nonnies based on everything I've read).

There's a line in the GTD book, if I recall, that says something like there's a paradox in that the people who need red wine the most are those are the most likely to get addicted to it. Pretty sure it's in the explorer profile. That's totally me.

I've pulled it out of my diet right now since I can't afford it and if I don't buy it for a few days (thanks, dopamine), I can usually stop drinking it for a while. I'm hoping to stop drinking completely for a few months and reset myself. Hopefully that helps.
Hi.  Do you mean that clotting too much is a problem or that not clotting enough is a problem?

Although I am not a councillor, if you can say goodbye to alcohol for an indefinite length of time simply on the basis of cost, it seems that you are not chemically addicted to alcohol.  I am the same way.  I used to drink like a fish during my late teens and early twenties.  Why I am not an alcoholic is probably because of the protective aspect of being a nonnie.

One useful detoxification that worked for me was fasting.  I have yet to succeed in the Explorer liver flush, even though I keep trying a few times each year.


My weight loss goal: 220 lbs.  A 6'4" dyslexic oddball: the size of a line-backer, the silhouette of Winnie-the-Pooh.
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paul clucas
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Quoted from Easy E


Alcohol like wine or beer is more beneficial for non secretors.  I find a good beer rejuvinating, even two or three sometimes.  But I dont need it or have to have it.  I have a beer or two about four nights a week.
Beer, to my lasting sorrow, is not going to be an option for most O nonnies.  Red wine has enough goodness for people to benefit from developing an appreciation moderate consumption.



My weight loss goal: 220 lbs.  A 6'4" dyslexic oddball: the size of a line-backer, the silhouette of Winnie-the-Pooh.
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misspudding
Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 9:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from paul clucas
Epigenetics modify the gene expression in each cell of the body, so epigenetic damage does definitely happen this way.  I know a man who got diabetes from the trauma of being thrown from his bike.  Diabetes seems to come in different degrees of seriousness which might depend on the location and extent of the trauma.



Holy c**p, seriously?

Though I have heard of people developing celiac after a particularly traumatic event or surgery.




misspudding

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misspudding
Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 9:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from paul clucas
Hi.  Do you mean that clotting too much is a problem or that not clotting enough is a problem?

Although I am not a councillor, if you can say goodbye to alcohol for an indefinite length of time simply on the basis of cost, it seems that you are not chemically addicted to alcohol.  I am the same way.  I used to drink like a fish during my late teens and early twenties.  Why I am not an alcoholic is probably because of the protective aspect of being a nonnie.


Too much clotting. I have at least one "bad" MTHFR polymorphism.

Yeah, I am able to stop drinking for a while. It takes about two days of me consciously not drinking for me to not "need" it anymore. Same with coffee. I've been off wine for several days and am not craving it at all. So yes, perhaps I'm not technically an alcoholic...but if I start drinking it again, I need more and more. It's such a dopamine feedback loop. Same exact thing with coffee. I don't even think it's a physical addiction...it's all mental.

That being said, when I do drink wine more than a glass here and there, I get serious nutritional deficiencies. Magnesium and the B-vitamins go poof! And then I have migraines. Ugh.




misspudding

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Patty H
Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 10:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from misspudding


Too much clotting. I have at least one "bad" MTHFR polymorphism.

Yeah, I am able to stop drinking for a while. It takes about two days of me consciously not drinking for me to not "need" it anymore. Same with coffee. I've been off wine for several days and am not craving it at all. So yes, perhaps I'm not technically an alcoholic...but if I start drinking it again, I need more and more. It's such a dopamine feedback loop. Same exact thing with coffee. I don't even think it's a physical addiction...it's all mental.

That being said, when I do drink wine more than a glass here and there, I get serious nutritional deficiencies. Magnesium and the B-vitamins go poof! And then I have migraines. Ugh.


Misspudding and Easy E, to you think that MTHFR is one of the hallmarks of an Explorer?  I ask this because I really do believe I am an Explorer and not a Hunter.  Dr. Nash did my genotype and she was positive I would type as an Explorer.  She was very surprised when I typed as a Hunter.  I have a rare blood antigen in the MN blood system - I am NMg  I also have one highly unusual fingerprint, a Radial Loop on my left D2.  I am a nonnie.  Those were the things we knew when she typed me.  Add the that the fact that I since discovered that I am toxic in lead and mercury, I have a Factor 2 SNP and one MTHFR SNP.

Are there specific genetic markers that are now known to type as an Explorer?  May as well use my 23andMe for something!!!



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Patty H
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Some of this answered my question, but he does not specifically mention MTHFR:

http://www.4yourtype.com/explorer.asp


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misspudding
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Quoted from Patty H


Misspudding and Easy E, to you think that MTHFR is one of the hallmarks of an Explorer?  I ask this because I really do believe I am an Explorer and not a Hunter.  Dr. Nash did my genotype and she was positive I would type as an Explorer.  She was very surprised when I typed as a Hunter.  I have a rare blood antigen in the MN blood system - I am MNg.  I also have one highly unusual fingerprint, a Radial Loop on my left D2.  I am a nonnie.  Those were the things we knew when she typed me.  Add the that the fact that I since discovered that I am toxic in lead and mercury, I have a Factor 2 SNP and one MTHFR SNP.

Are there specific genetic markers that are now known to type as an Explorer?  May as well use my 23andMe for something!!!


It probably adds to the likelihood of being an Explorer, seeing as having an MTHFR SNP makes your liver a lot slower to process stuff.

But, for example, my husband is such a classic Hunter, it's not even funny. And we know he has at least one MTHFR SNP, too, because our son is homozygous (neither of us have been tested). Perhaps if you have an MTHFR SNP and you had a really fabulous womb environment and access to a lot of high quality, nutrition growing up, then you're less likely to be an Explorer.




misspudding

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DS: O negative; "atypical" IBD - SWAMI 44% Explorer

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Patty H
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Quoted from misspudding


It probably adds to the likelihood of being an Explorer, seeing as having an MTHFR SNP makes your liver a lot slower to process stuff.

But, for example, my husband is such a classic Hunter, it's not even funny. And we know he has at least one MTHFR SNP, too, because our son is homozygous (neither of us have been tested). Perhaps if you have an MTHFR SNP and you had a really fabulous womb environment and access to a lot of high quality, nutrition growing up, then you're less likely to be an Explorer.


Misspudding, this study really resonated with me! I don't think Hamburger Helper and Oreos would qualify as high nutrition.  I did eat a lot of fruit and liked veggies too, but I grew up in a very STRESSFUL environment with emotional and physical abuse (not directed at me) towards my mother and siblings.  I observed all of this from a very young age (5) and was always on high alert.  I was the baby by a lot and my dad's favorite, so I was not a target.  

What was good for me was that I grew up next to a playground with a huge group of kids my age, so my solution was to be at home as little as possible.  I sent the study to my Naturopath because right now I am dealing with adrenal fatigue among other issues.  Lots of things going on in my present situation that exacerbate this as well.  

Basically, I believe I am probably screwed epigenetically from my childhood but I did start watching my health and nutrition by the age of 18, so hopefully the damage is not too severe.



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