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inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer's  This thread currently has 929 views. Print Print Thread
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Chloe
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 5:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Spring
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 7:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Wow, those comments on the article at CNN were emotional to say the least. If I were some of those people I wouldn't be getting all riled up so about the difference in the percentages of men and women getting AD. I've seen more men die with brain cancer than women, and that is really awful too. Whatever the percentages, AD is a very horrible disease for anyone. I know one man, though, who has been brilliant and successful in every way but has in the last couple of years been diagnosed with AD. It devastated him and his family, but his doctors have him on all kinds of alternative treatments, and he has shown considerable improvement even though it had been very progressive. I have read articles about ways people can keep their minds active doing different things to help avoid AD, but this man was an inventor whose mind was forever inclined toward inventions of one sort or another and had the patents and royalties to prove it. He was and still is more active than anyone his age I know, but it didn't spare him from AD.

I've known people who were more forgetful nearly than anybody, but they never got AD. There just doesn't seem to be any rhyme or reason for who will get it.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Chloe
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 8:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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scary....40 years ago when DDT was being used, then banned....well, it's still lingering in the environment....in people's bodies...

http://www.scientificamerican......-alzheimers-disease/


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Spring
Thursday, April 10, 2014, 10:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My dad used DDT like it was "going out of style" which it certainly was, and he never had any mental problems at all unless using DDT was a symptom! But, of course, back then when they first started using the stuff, people didn't know how long-lived it was and how terrible it was for their health. Of course, that was over fifty years ago.  People had better food in those days, though, than we do now. The land was not so worn out. I never knew anyone who used DDT on food crops.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Chloe
Friday, April 11, 2014, 12:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
My dad used DDT like it was "going out of style" which it certainly was, and he never had any mental problems at all unless using DDT was a symptom! But, of course, back then when they first started using the stuff, people didn't know how long-lived it was and how terrible it was for their health. Of course, that was over fifty years ago.  People had better food in those days, though, than we do now. The land was not so worn out. I never knew anyone who used DDT on food crops.


Based on how each genotype detoxes environmental pollution and other poisons, it's likely  your dad could clear toxins easily. DDT didn't stay in his system...and then of course, there must
be a genetic predisposition for some to get AD and others, not.. Why was your dad using so much
DDT?  It seems more related to cancer than neuro degenerative diseases.

DDT was one of the first chemicals in widespread use as a pesticide. Following World War II, it was promoted as a wonder-chemical, the simple solution to pest problems large and small. Today, nearly 40 years after DDT was banned in the U.S., we continue to live with its long-lasting effects:

Food supplies: USDA found DDT breakdown products in 60% of heavy cream samples, 42% of kale greens, 28% of carrots and lower percentages of many other foods.
Body burden: DDT breakdown products were found in the blood of 99% of the people tested by CDC.
Health impacts: Girls exposed to DDT before puberty are 5 times more likely to develop breast cancer in middle age, according to the President’s Cancer Panel.


http://www.panna.org/issues/persistent-poisons/the-ddt-story





"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Spring
Friday, April 11, 2014, 4:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It wasn't as if he actually used so much of it because it was so "effective" he didn't have to, but he used it for any known bug around, especially termites. There has never been any breast cancer even in my extended family.

Of course, anywhere cotton was grown planes were flying around spraying the stuff right and left to fight the boll weevil. Ironically, there is one town somewhere in the South that has a statue honoring the boll weevil. The reason being that it put the farmers out of the cotton business into growing peanuts. So, at least, that farmland did not get ruined with DDT. Actually, the farmers had no idea how much they really did owe the boll weevil even though at first they thought they were going to go broke. They may have owed the little rascals their lives!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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KimonoKat
Friday, April 11, 2014, 9:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I thought O's were more susceptible than other blood types. No?  


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.
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susanC
Friday, April 11, 2014, 6:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Very interesting Spring. So now they're growing peanuts in the soil that was heavily sprayed with DDT?
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Spring
Friday, April 11, 2014, 6:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from susanC
Very interesting Spring. So now they're growing peanuts in the soil that was heavily sprayed with DDT?


No, they were already put out of business by the time DDT came along.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Jane
Friday, April 11, 2014, 7:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Interesting.  I didn't know that.   My mother had AD.  My father ended up with colon cancer but kept working as a hydraulic engineer until the day he died.  My mother was a stay at home mom.  I think my father's work, some of which was groundbreaking, kept him young.  He had associates all over the world and he was a great networker.  My mother's world was very small.  
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Chloe
Friday, April 11, 2014, 8:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Poisons like DDT and other environmental pollution are the very things that
turn a genetic predisposition for a disease into an actual disease. There is a switch that gets turned
on for some people exposed to particular poison...but not everyone is vulnerable to same toxicity.

The oddest thing for me is that we moved from NY to Atlanta, Georgia when I was 7...My mother was diagnosed with Hodgkins Lymphoma when I was 9, less than 2 years after my youngest sister was born.  She lived for 12 years with it... So, here's what I find curious...Within a 2 mile radius of where we lived, 3 women were diagnosed with hodgkins Lymphoma...2 died before my mother did.  Many of my mother's friends had cancer...Many of our neighbors had cancer.  I would have loved to have figured out the common denominator....a virus spread through our drinking water? ....was something sprayed from airplanes to kill pests?....was the government doing experiments.?..WHY would 3 women have the same type of cancer living  in such close proximity?  My sisters and I keep thinking that something was in our drinking water. Something that was covered up.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Averno
Friday, April 11, 2014, 10:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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They sprayed it everywhere, even in suburban communities to control mosquitos.  There were public service TV spots showing children running behind the vehicles in the fog.

It's still sanctioned by the WHO for use in Africa to reduce malaria, it's original intended use. Better sick than dead, I guess...  


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Spring
Friday, April 11, 2014, 10:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe
  My sisters and I keep thinking that something was in our drinking water. Something that was covered up.


I think "covering up" is still alive and well in this country as we write. I remember only too well how Rachel Carson was hated. Everything she said was true.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Chloe
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 9:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/alzheimers_statins.html

Not sure if this link is relative to the subject header, but I find it totally fascinating that a few years
after my daughter in law's mother was put on statins, her memory became fuzzy.  It's been 6 years
since she started statin drugs to lower her mildly elevated cholesterol ...(and although I've sent the family articles like this before, the PCP
who prescribed this drug does not see a connection)....so she is still on the drug....is now 82 with a definitive diagnosis of Alzheimers...She's ready to be living either with full time help at home or in a facility that specializes in this disease.  She's blood type O which this article states that AD could have an h pylori connection. Infection related.  Wonder if studies have been done on people who have
AD and H pylori...  This poor woman was always so vain and conscious of her weight that she ate an almost fat free diet.....egg white omelets, salads without dressing, food cooked without fat. Also
ate a lot of wheat....dry toasted bagels...fat free cream cheese..  Her belief was always that fat caused fat bodies.  Doesn't seem possible that her diet and statins caused her AD diagnosis, but sadly it appears very likely that there could be a connection.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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C_Sharp
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 11:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe
This poor woman was always so vain and conscious of her weight that she ate an almost fat free diet.....egg white omelets, salads without dressing, food cooked without fat.


I did fat free for a while until my mother pointed out that the brain was 60% fat.


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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jeanb
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 1:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The APOE4 gene seems to travel down the female lines in my family.  I inherited the gene from my mother.  

My mother, her sister and their mother all suffered from Alzheimer's.  My grandmother spoke 7 languages, my mother and her sister had very full lives and careers. Interesting to note my brother and my sons didn't inherit the APOE4 gene.

None of the men in my maternal family suffered from the disease.  Only 1 female relative we can trace survived the war into old age.  She recently died of AD at the age of 87.  Her son did not inherit the gene.  

My bet is that APOE4 is one factor, in my family, it travels in the female genetic make-up.  My guess, for my mother's generation, the smoking, lack of exercise and other factors may have turned it on.  My grandmother had rheumatic fever as a child and ended up with serious heart issues in her mid 60's, she also had her first baby when she was 16 and had a hard life, which may or may not have contributed to AD.  

I do wish there was an easy do this, don't do that answer for AD, but I suspect it is far more complex problem to solve.
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Jane
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 4:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Jeanb, Interesting comments.  My mother never had genetic testing.  She was 93 when she died and did have AD. She was diagnosed by a neuologist after some back surgery. Her brother who is in his late 80s was recently diagnosed with dementia.  My mother led a very sedentary life, didn't work outside the home most of her life.  I've often thought that her world was too small and didn't challenge her sufficiently.

It's such a sad disease.  I felt like I was robbed of my mother at least 10 years before she finally passed away.  
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Chloe
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 4:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from jeanb
The APOE4 gene seems to travel down the female lines in my family.  I inherited the gene from my mother.  

My mother, her sister and their mother all suffered from Alzheimer's.  My grandmother spoke 7 languages, my mother and her sister had very full lives and careers. Interesting to note my brother and my sons didn't inherit the APOE4 gene.

None of the men in my maternal family suffered from the disease.  Only 1 female relative we can trace survived the war into old age.  She recently died of AD at the age of 87.  Her son did not inherit the gene.  

My bet is that APOE4 is one factor, in my family, it travels in the female genetic make-up.  My guess, for my mother's generation, the smoking, lack of exercise and other factors may have turned it on.  My grandmother had rheumatic fever as a child and ended up with serious heart issues in her mid 60's, she also had her first baby when she was 16 and had a hard life, which may or may not have contributed to AD.  

I do wish there was an easy do this, don't do that answer for AD, but I suspect it is far more complex problem to solve.



I am APOe 3/4....so far, my brain is working fine.   Nobody in my family ever had the slightest signs of memory loss...Nobody but me ever followed a diet for my blood type.  I agree, it's
not
a simple problem to solve.



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jeanb
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 4:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi Chloe and Jane:

Dr. D. posted something on Facebook about women, APOE4 and persistence of the disease in women after I posted, I haven't had a chance to read the article thoroughly, but it does show some correlation about being female and APOE4 and AD.

As I watch my mother go through AD, my sister, the home and I are all watching my mom's physical health improve (no medications - her high blood pressure, cholesterol and thyroid issues have all resolved themselves) as her AD symptoms become worse and worse.  My sister and I wonder if we should perhaps check into all inclusive resort style living  - stress free and see if our physical aches and pains go away and if the brain disintegrates....
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Jane
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 5:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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jeanb....I'm in with the all inclusive .  
My mother had some health issues but had no cancers that I'm aware of.  She had thyroid issues which I now believe were undertreated and she had some digestive issues, a hiatal hernia which was so large that she was told it was inoperable when she was younger.There were at times it was so bad that she bled internally.  Her hematocrit was so low that they had to give her blood.  I saw confusion from that as well.  There are just so many things that I guess we still don't know.  Dementia really got much worse after her extensive back surgery - two procedures and I think she was out too long - more than 6 hours if I remember correctly.  She was diagnosed with AD while in rehab for her back.
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Chloe
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 6:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Interesting statistics

Alzheimer’s and dementia is most common in Western Europe (North America is close behind)
Alzheimer’s is least prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa. (Alzheimer’s Disease International)



I guess we need to study the people of sub Saharan Africa.


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Jane
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 7:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Maybe the numbers are skewed by how long people live, availability of healthcare and diagnosis????
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Chloe
Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 8:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Jane
Maybe the numbers are skewed by how long people live, availability of healthcare and diagnosis????


Sounds very plausible.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Chloe
Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Captain_Janeway
Thursday, April 17, 2014, 6:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I know two people who have this disease one a community college president who was a good friend of my father died recently and the other is a very talented and intelligent  woman in our church who played the organ and could sing beautifully. So sad to see this disease ravage its victims.

I have heard that there is a "high functioning" form of this disease and it often occurs in seniors who have an above average IQ. But most people that I have known with this disease are normal or well above normal in intelligence. I guess it doesn't discriminate regards its victims.


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