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plantar fasciitis  This thread currently has 8,662 views. Print Print Thread
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Victoria
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 4:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I have a friend who is dealing with plantar fasciitis, and her doctor only suggests cortisone injections.  Do any of you have any suggestions that I can offer her that might help to correct this problem, and, of course, ease her pain?



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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speedy
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 10:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1Hunter
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It does take a long while to heal - she will have to be patient especially if she is older - nothing to do really just keep going gently and time will heal

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pixelland
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 11:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ouch!..  been there myself...

First experience was in my late 20's from spending too much time in poorly designed work boots, walking on concrete...  without sufficient arch supports. I was also about 70 lbs overweight, which is an important factor. I had it in both feet, but didn't know what it was. I just knew my feet hurt like hell when I tried to stand in the morning, or after sitting for even half an hour. I guess it eventually went away because my job changed, and probably so did my shoes.... plus I dropped the weight!

It came back about 2 years ago just in my right foot. My weight was back up maybe 25 lbs, and I had also been "favoring" my right foot because of a plantars wart on the heel, and I think that is what started it....  VERY painful....

The "catch 22" was how to lose the weight when my foot hurt. It is inflammation of the tendon, and you don't want to aggravate the condition by the method of exercise. While walking can be the best way to ease into fitness for most, it doesn't work well if the problem is in your feet...      

I first went to the podiatrist...  stuck my right foot up and said "HELP"!!! His solutions were chemo for the wart (didn't work!) and cortisone injections for the PF...  I put off the injections for several visits before I finally caved in and let him torture me by sticking a long needle into my heel from the side....   Didn't work!!!! It did ease the symptoms a bit, but it didn't make the problem go away... I also have one of those silly foot braces in a closet somewhere...  couldn't sleep with it on!

A local pharmacist who also believes in natural cures (now that's a rare one!) recommended duct tape for the wart...  and it was gone in one week...

My chiropractor fixed my PF. I had been to several chiros before, but this guy is amazing. He works with more than just the spine, adjusting the entire body (legs, feet, arms, hands...). He's modest, and won't claim credit...  but I think I would still be hobbling around if not for his adjustments to my lower back and hips. I also got custom orthotics through him that I wear when I spend a lot of time on my feet.

My recommendations? If she's heavy, find low-impact ways to help her lose weight. For me it was cycling and yoga. Make sure her shoes have adequate arch supports...  no more cutsie shoes with flimsy soles.. Consider chiropractic treatment, being sure to tell the practitioner her problem. Consider a high-quality orthotic to help realign her arches.

Two exercises the podiatrist recommended did help ease the pain. When she wakes up, have her hang her legs over the side of the bed and "write the alphabet" with her feet. Feels a bit silly the first few time, but it helps stretch the tendon before she stands up. The reason it hurts in the morning is that we relax our feet when we sleep, allowing the tendon to draw up tight. Sudden standing will aggravate an alread inflamed condition. Also, rolling her foot on a tennis ball or a soup can can help massage out the tendon.

There is one yoga postion that would help too... sit on your knees, and then lean forward shifting your feet up onto the toes... then sit back up, putting as much weigh on your feet as you can stand. It is a simple position, but it can hurt like hell for some people. Do this gently twice a day, maybe morning and evening, to help stretch the tendon.

I hope some of this helps. I know the pain and misery of it. Please tell her that it CAN go away. My feet haven't hurt in over a year..



"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein

Revision History (1 edits)
pixelland  -  Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 11:57am
forgot to include the yoga!
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Peppermint Twist
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 12:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
I have a friend who is dealing with plantar fasciitis, and her doctor only suggests cortisone injections.  Do any of you have any suggestions that I can offer her that might help to correct this problem, and, of course, ease her pain?

In a word:  Crocs.  Cayman style, specifically.  They fixed me!



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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ruthie
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 12:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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There is another thread on this out somewhere, which I can't find.

2 or 3 years ago, my left food would ache so badly that i could hardly stand it.  One day my step-girl was visiting and asked me what was wrong.  When I told her, she said i have had that for years.  So i asked her why she was not limping.  The short story is that she went to a podiatrist who told her she had plantar faciatist.  Well I thought it was just one of the aches of old age and had never heard of this.  She said she had purchased some inserts for her shoes from him.  She went to his office and brought me inserts in my size.  From the first day, I had relief and have been wearing them ever since.
I can't go barefoot, which I have always loved...especially in the morning dew.  Funny thing is that these inserts are made in Poland, and right and left is in Polish.
namaste
ruthie


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pixelland
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 1:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthie
She went to his office and brought me inserts in my size.


Please consider having custom inserts made. Like our bodies don't do well with "one-size fits all"... neither do our feet! I'm glad for Ruthie that the generic ones helped, but consider the following analogy:

Person quits SAD, starts eating freshly prepared food, and shows some health improvement...
Same person discovers BTD/GTD... "fine-tunes" their diet..  and therefore fixes the other less obivious health problems and balances the body for the future....

Modern technology is wonderful...  a simple scan of the foot and 1-2 weeks of production time.. and you have an orthotic designed for YOUR feet. My insurance actually paid for mine!   But even if they hadn't, they are worth their weight in gold!


"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein
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funkymuse
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 2:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Been here done this.  Weight gain and pounding my feet during my singing performances brought it on.  Couldn't even hardly walk in the morning.  Went to an orthopedic doc and he gave me these open toe boot like things to wear at night.  They would keep my feet flexed so that when I awoke to stand in the morning my feet wouldn't hurt.  They hurt in the morning because at night your feet relax and work to heal and they are in a relaxed position so all the tendons and fibers heal shortened up.  And thus when you stand... rip, RIP, RIP!  And ouch, OUCH, OUCH!  And all that healing that took place during the night goes to hel...

So the boots keep your feet flexed and all the tendons and fibers heal in the elongated position at night.  These boots  REALLY work.  Cured me right up.  Took a little time but it definitely worked.

As well, stretching the calfs deeply is what all the doc and chiros told me.

I wish you well, it's painful!
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BuzyBee
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 2:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I had the plantar fascitis a few years ago which is very painful. I have high arches. Having a shoe with good arch suppport is key. I wear the Dansko's which totally took my pain away.

She could also try wearing a ace bandage on her ankles. They have ones that slide over the foot and ankle which is like a sock and has good support as well.

If I remember correctly it falling arches and creates pain.

Good shoes is a must have. Invest in a good shoe with arch support.
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pixelland
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 3:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BuzyBee
Good shoes is a must have. Invest in a good shoe with arch support.


I wear "tennis shoes" for work, but many are not so good in the support department. I went to a store that specializes in running shoes for athletes. The sales person was very helpful. I was shocked when he told me that he had suffered from PF since highschool.   He couldn't have been a day over 25 and was thin. Blamed it on wearing popular sport shoes, like those made for basketball. Shoes designed for quick turns have minimal arch support because that might make you turn your ankle.

He knew which shoes to recommend, and let me try them on with a variety of different inserts... both my own and some he sold. Back to recommending custom inserts - the correct insert for your foot is not likely to be the one that feels most comfortable. To correct a problem, inserts put pressure on the areas that need to move....  


"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein
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BuzyBee
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 3:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I wear Dansko's (clogs)which are the best and croc do ok for me to. If I wear another shoe I can't wait to get home to put my Dansko or croc's on.
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jayneeo
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 3:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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deep calf stretches, (grabbing my toes and pulling, straightlegged...but work up to it slowly), doing "point, flex, point, flex" before touching my feet to the floor in the morning...never go barefoot (wah!)....and crocs!!!! (or those orthotics...)
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BuzyBee
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Quoted Text
jayneeo       

     
never go barefoot (wah!)....and crocs!!!! (or those orthotics...)


Never go barefoot. Especially if you have wood or tile floods. My legs will ache. That's where the croc's come in. I wear these around the house while I am doing my chores.
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jayneeo
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 5:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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even when going to the bathroom in the middle of the night...have some kind of shoe, clog, whatever, by the bed.....
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Victoria
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 5:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you so much, everyone!!  

I have sent all your suggestions and warm wishes to my suffering friend, and I know she will try anything and everything!

If you think of anything else that might relieve her pain, please keep the ideas coming.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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pixelland
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 5:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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one more thought, Victoria....

plantar fasciatis is an inflammation of the fascia tendon... She should follow her personal protocols for reducing inflammation, too.  


"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein
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Tea Rose
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 6:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from ruthie
There is another thread on this out somewhere, which I can't find.


This link to "Crocs rock" http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-rost/m-1212506354/s-75/ has quite a bit about plantar fasciitis.




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Peppermint Twist
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 6:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
Thank you so much, everyone!!  

I have sent all your suggestions and warm wishes to my suffering friend, and I know she will try anything and everything!

If you think of anything else that might relieve her pain, please keep the ideas coming.  

I should have elaborated:  Crocs for regular wear, but for long walks/hikes, it is worth going to a podiatrist and having him or her cut you out an insert (singular, in my case, he totally ignored my left foot, even though it had plantar fasciitis, too...probably because my legs are such different lengths so he only wanted the short one, which was also the one with the worst plantar fasciitis, to have the slightly increased height of an insert) that can be moved from shoe to shoe.  I'm not talking about an expensive orthotic something-or-other but just an over-the-counter-looking "Dr. Scholl" type of insole that the podiatrist will cut into how he wants to cut it for your foot.  Then you (or, your friend, more accurately *lol*) can put it in your good walking sneaks for long hikes, or in dress shoes if she absolutely must wear them to work or wherever.  I myself wear Crocs EVERYWHERE and everyone in my life knows to say NOTHING *lol*.

Also never wear Crocs around "sharps", i.e., broken glass, nails, long bougainvillea thorns (learned that one the hard way), etc.

But for most everyday wear, I can't say enough about Crocs for plantar fasciitis.  Everyone's case is different, as it was caused by different factors and everyone's feet are different, BUT Crocs are worth a try.

I honestly didn't think anything was going to help me, but these totally fixed the problem.  I love when a health prob is FIXED.  Love that!  Love that in a health problem *lol*!

edited to add:  you can wear Crocs for long hikes, but it will wear the Crocs out faster (the soles are very thick, yet relatively soft, and they wear out within a few years of the constant use I give 'em--they probably last two to three years) and it is probably better for your feet to go with a customized insole (or two) cut by a podiatrist for such outtings.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (2 edits)
Peppermint Twist  -  Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 6:36pm
we really thought the crocodile rock would last...
Peppermint Twist  -  Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 6:25pm
muah ha ha, ho ho ho, and a couple of sometimes-I-slay-myself's!
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TJ
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 11:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I've had this trouble too.  In my right foot, which is also my shorter leg.  I wear a heel lift in my right shoe to make up the difference in leg length, and that helps my lower back and my foot.  I used to walk and stand more heavily on my right foot, and my right heel always felt like it had a bone spur at the bottom of it.

I've never worn crocs--and never will, if I have anything to do with it! --but Birkenstocks helped mine.  I also wore drug store arch supports in my shoes (on top of the heel lift).  Stretching my hamstrings and calves helped a lot.

Funny, once my foot healed up, I found that I NEEDED to walk around barefooted sometimes, even now.  If I don't, the muscles in my feet get lazy, and my arch starts aching again.  I still use the lift, and I still wear the supports in shoes that don't have good arch support built in.
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Mayflowers
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 11:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I said it in the other thread also.  Stretch the achilles tendon. The doc told me the reason people get planter whatever, is because the achilles tendons are too tight. Place one foot behind you and gently lean forward until you feel the pull in the tendon. He also said to wear supportive shoes..that tied. Mine was cured and I always stretch it when I work out now and I've never had a problem since.

Ms. PT, swears by crocs as a cure for her planter..that. I didn't have crocs at the time so I can't hold a controlled study.  
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Whimsical
Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 11:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Based on my experience...

Hydrotherapy at home for immediate pain relief, chiro and/or physio for short-term symptom relief and learning stretching and other at-home techniques to reduce symptoms, osteopathy for long-term correction of the structural imbalances causing the problem.  

I cannot say enough good about osteopathy.  I have seen several chiros, 2 excellent physios, and used orthotics over the past 5-6 years and after spending a lot of money, time, and effort have seen the most dramatic and permanent results from osteopathy.  After 2 visits, I have doubled the amount of time I can run without pain, which has included plantar fasciitis among other structural issues.  I go for my 3rd treatment next week!


MIFHI E-185
Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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pixelland
Wednesday, August 13, 2008, 12:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Whimsical... what type of treatments? Can you describe them?


"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein
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Whimsical
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Osteopathic treatments?  If you want to learn more about osteopathy, you can read this, which is from Ontario, the province I live in.  

I know that in the US there is some great variation in osteopathy as it seems that many osteopaths operate just like MDs...  However I am sure there are others that have chosen to remain true to the founding principles of osteopathy.  

My experience so far is that osteopathy is at once a very gentle yet deep healing modality that appears capable of effecting truly holistic and permanent changes in the body.


MIFHI E-185
Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Chloe
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pixelland
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Quoted from Whimsical
Osteopathic treatments?  If you want to learn more about osteopathy, you can read this, which is from Ontario, the province I live in.  


Thanks for the link. Very interesting. I do think the American version may differ greatly.  

I am fortunate that my chiropractor is highly intuitive and can read a body well. He is also trained in deep tissue massage, and integrates that into the sessions as needed. Plus his wife is a chiro also, with equal training in nutrition.

Isn't it wonderful to find good therapy!!!


"Don't ever become a pessimist... a pessimist is correct oftener than an optimist, but an optimist has more fun, and neither can stop the march of events."
Robert A. Heinlein
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Victoria
Thursday, August 14, 2008, 3:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Once again, thanks to you all for sharing.  I would not wish chronic pain on anyone, and hope you all stay free from this condition forever!!  

My friend thanks you all, and said that she is already beginning to use some of your suggestions.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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