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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  ›  Preventing Menopause
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Preventing Menopause  This thread currently has 2,484 views. Print Print Thread
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funkymuse
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 3:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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How To Stop Menopause Before it Starts

http://www.preventingmenopause.com

I happened upon this book by extreme accident and have read it and am now giving it to my Naturalpath who is planning to read it and work with me this issue before I go into full blown 'ovarian failure' which is what menopause is.  

Anyone who has hit menopause or is close to menopause or experiencing the symptoms of peri SHOULD DEFINITELY read this book.  

It is new research and facts by a gal - Beth Rosenshein - who was suffering greatly from all the effects of her hormones shifting and decided to try and figure out what was really happening to her.

I hope this helps as I see many threads relating to hormonal suffering and struggles.

Happy New Year and Blessings to All!

Revision History (1 edits)
ironwood55  -  Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 3:31pm
Edited message subject per Forum Etiquette guidelines.
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italybound
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 3:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Does this book apply to someone who has had a complete hysterectomy?



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Hopeful
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 4:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Menopause is immeadiate after a complete hysterectomy and cannot be reversed.
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funkymuse
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 4:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Possibly not because Menopause is 'ovaian failure' so if you have no ovaries left...

But if you are on replacement hormones, you might want to research this anyway.  She goes into great detail about HRT and bio-identical hormones versus non-bio-identical, etc.
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ISA-MANUELA
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 4:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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omG...I think here is someone trying to go over the boards about normal female bodyfunctions
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funkymuse
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 5:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Before you make such assumptions, you should read the book.

We have been 'taught' about what 'normal female function' is "supposed" to be.

Again, before making such comments you should read the book and then you will understand why I feel this is very important if not to anyone else, certainly to me.

It's nice to know there is someone who has gone deeper and found out we don't have to have ovarian failure but can preserve what Mother Nature intended for us for many many years which is good hormonal health.

Peace...
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ISA-MANUELA
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 7:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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fmuse, it wasn't intended to offend you, not at all; but only my opinion...and what's that, behind or beyond all...is everytime the point *to do sales*....so far thatswhy I allowed myselve to do this statement....Menopause is a normal statement for every woman to go threw, and here somebody tries to play *godess* games, sorry that my feeling here.....and we are often malinformed only to go for further sales ....even by our FDA's or whatsoever....if you see the foodpyramids...I am getting but I will read this book, and then we might go into further discussions ..ok?

p.s.
I am always looking what's the kind of psychogram of the initiator of the scripts
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bec-australia
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 9:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks for the link funkymuse!!!  I'm ordering it in from my bookstore now.
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Lola
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 9:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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who has read the health series book on menopause?

Dr D has taken all aspects into consideration, and ha developed an easy to follow complete guide!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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ISA-MANUELA
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 9:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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ahem have tried to get those books here in the bookstores...very hard
I only have the encyclop & diabetic & cancer books and of course ER4YT & LR4YT
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Dewdrop
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 9:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I am reading the Menopause book by Dr D now...and will be going forward with all of his suggestions.
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Lola
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 11:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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great read!

so uncomplicated!! that s what I like about the whole concept!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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ISA-MANUELA
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 7:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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äääää   I do have problems to get to acknowledge that menopause should be seen as a desease.... you might intervent..yup but prevent...nah !    

Revision History (1 edits)
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 7:35am
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Peppermint Twist
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 1:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm with Tomatilla all the way on this one.  I find it an awful notion to think of "preventing menopause", it reminds me of the pills they have now to make it so a woman only menstruates every three months or whatever the interval is.  And I find the term "ovarian failure" to be really offensive to anyone who respects nature and the cyclical nature of everything (including us) that is a part of it.  Menopause is not a failure of one's ovaries.  It is a natural part of the female life cycle.  You cannot prevent menopause or, if you can, imho, you shouldn't.  It is like holding back an ocean tide, damming a river, stopping your periods, removing a dog's vocal chords because the barking is inconvenient or declawing a cat...I could go on.  Menopause is a universal, natural part of the female life cycle.

Sure, take natural supplements, etc., to minimize any challenging symptoms and to balance your system out as much as possible, but that is as far as any "tampering" with the process should go, imho.

This is not meant in any attacking way towards funkymuse, btw, if there was any doubt.  Just to express my abhorrence of the ideas and phrases that the book being discussed puts out there, like "preventing menapause" and, even worse/more objectionable, "ovarian failure".  I'm with Tomatilla.  I have a big problem with both of those ideas/loaded phrases, on so many levels.  I will not be reading that book.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (2 edits)
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:32pm
*cringe*:  corrected spelling of menopause.
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 1:49pm
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OSuzanna
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm with PTwist and Tomatilla on this one. Do I want to be 80 and having periods!?! Methinks not!!! This is a natural process, menopause, one to be handled with as much love and grace as possible (and sassy attitude), not prevented. I will be curious to see the science behind this, but in the meantime, color me skeptical.


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geminisue
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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????I had a tubular ligation in the seventies and had uterus removed in the 80's, never been on hormones, never had hot flashes but had some crying spells years ago.  Is it to late for me to benefit from the book??  
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Peppermint Twist
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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from osuzanna
Do I want to be 80 and having periods!?! Methinks not!!!



Now here I was trying to explain why the whole idea and phrasing in the book (at least what I've seen posted and discussed of the book) is cosmically and spiritually abhorrent and offensive to me, and you come along and put it in a much more down-to-earth, clear way **!!!!  omg, too funny.

Seriously, just to get back to the phrase (this phrase is really BUGGING me the more I think on it) of "ovarian failure", it is so loaded!  Who says your ovaries are "failing" just because they are reaching or have reached the end of their productive phase?  They aren't failing, they are "retiring".  So throw an appreciative retirement party, complete with gold watch and many speeches thanking them for their years of service and, if you have kids, the beautiful, miraculous job they did.  Celebrate them and then let them relax at Club Med for the duration.  Don't call them "failures"!  A failure implies that something has gone wrong, that they are failing to work as they are supposed to.  When a machine fails, it fails to work as designed, fails to work properly.  Well, menapause is not that at all!  It isn't that something or a system isn't working as designed, it is proceeding just as planned by nature!  They (your ovaries) have completed their years of service and are now relaxing in the background as nature intended while other things in life take center stage.  All part of the plan, nothing has failed!

But anyway, I'm getting all cosmic again and I really think Osuzanna put it in a much better way *L*!  I'll reiterate her quote again and my response to it, which rang out far and wide from my cubicle:

Quoted from osuzanna
Do I want to be 80 and having periods!?! Methinks not!!!






"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

my Facebook page

Revision History (4 edits)
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:58pm
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:57pm
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:57pm
ironwood55  -  Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 2:55pm
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Lola
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 6:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Dr D doesn t make a big deal about menopause........eating right and supplementing right as well as leading a right lifestyle will Carry you through this, nicely!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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semmens
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 6:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I'm on the same page with those who think "preventing" menopause is treating it like a disease. Pregnancy has had the same thing happen...it's completely medicalized for most people and instead of being a natural process, it's something a woman is supposed to turn over to the appropriate medical authorities.

I have not read Dr.D's menopause book but will have to check it out.
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Janet
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 7:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Well I'm smack bang in the middle of it!!!
Would I change that...actually no!!
I'll tell you why, because when I had my very first hot flush it was in 1999....off I went and started taking HRT. The medics told me that it would take me 'through' the menopause (and they still tell people the same today) but the truth is that it puts the menopause on 'hold'.
So when I stopped taking it....back they came...on and on.....

My SIL had to go through the menopause well into her 60s because of HRT.
I couldn't imagine anything more unnatural than delaying the menopause or never having to go through it....as has been said before, it is a natural part of being a woman and cannot be equated with a malfunction of the body.



Janet
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san j
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 9:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I, for one, am loving Menopause...the book and the process.  Like PT, I equated the content of the thread to a TV ad for a drug that prevents menstruation: That scared the bj's outa me. Do I wanna be 80 and having periods? Heck, do I wanna be 55 and having periods? Not really.

I was BORN for menopause...I seem to have an amazing amount of energy, consistently, rather than "cycling".


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
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semmens
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 9:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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One more thing....the more I read about "bioidentical hormones" the more skeptical I am. No matter where a hormone comes from (a lab or a wild yam) if it is the same substance your body will react to it the same way. Plus I agree with those who feel that though well-intentioned, compounding pharmacies cannot be consistent with quality or dosage.
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eh
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 1:57am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Sam Dan
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The title of the book alone had me laughing so hard my bum just about fell off - it is soooo Internetish. Genius level.

Let's start a "How to Stop..." series.

Other titles in the 'How to Stop' series to look out for:

How to stop Puberty Before it Starts;

How to Stop Menstruation Before It Starts;

How to Stop Adolescence Before it Starts;

How to Stop Pregnancy Before it Starts (aka the pill)

How to Stop Adulthood Before it Starts;

How to Stop Eating Before it Starts;

How to Stop Thinking Before it Starts;

How to Stop Sex Before it Starts;

How to Just Stop.



And then there's the retrospective 'How to Stop Series' including:

How to Stop Your Own Conception;

How to Stop Death Before it Starts; and best of all,

How to Stop the How to Stop Menopause Before it Starts.

eh


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Lola
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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but I bet the 'how to stop binging' would be a huge success!!! lol


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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OSuzanna
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sam Dan
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Quoted from eh

The title of the book alone had me laughing so hard my bum just about fell off - it is soooo Internetish. Genius level.

Let's start a "How to Stop..." series.

Other titles in the 'How to Stop' series to look out for:

How to stop Puberty Before it Starts;

How to Stop Menstruation Before It Starts;

How to Stop Adolescence Before it Starts;

How to Stop Pregnancy Before it Starts (aka the pill)

How to Stop Adulthood Before it Starts;

How to Stop Eating Before it Starts;

How to Stop Thinking Before it Starts;

How to Stop Sex Before it Starts;

How to Just Stop.



And then there's the retrospective 'How to Stop Series' including:

How to Stop Your Own Conception;

How to Stop Death Before it Starts; and best of all,

How to Stop the How to Stop Menopause Before it Starts.

eh




OSuzanna
A Before Picture , In the Process of Becoming an After Picture
FOOD for THOUGHT, Super Beneficial 4 All Blood Types!
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi,

My name is Beth Rosenshein and I am the author of Preventing Menopause.

At one time in my life I too looked forward to menopause. To me, it meant not worrying about birth control. When I realized that something much more than just the end of my periods was happening I began researching what could cause such changes. I was very surprised to see words like ovarian failure and hypogonadism and it made me question how such words could be the same as menopause. At the time this was happening to me I knew that I didn't want my children to suffer the same fate. I still don't. That said, I realize that each person must pick their own journey. I choose a journey that some want to take and others don't. I feel good about the path I took because I understand it.

Is this a normal process? Having experienced it I would say it is as normal as any other part of our body aging. For instance, every person over 50 will need reading glasses. It happens to everyone so it's normal. Do we ignore it? No, we wear glasses. Same thing for our teeth, joints, hearing, etc.

I continue to read the medical literature on menopause and have become accustomed to seeing the words hypogonadism and ovarian failure. It is what it is. So whether we like it or not we've got it and each of us must decide if we want to treat it. I wish I knew all of this before and was better prepared for 'the change'. I wrote my book so that women can have the necessary information to make the choice of treatment or no treatment for themselves. Please understand that I am not a proponent of HRT as it is currently prescribed to women because it is not based on ovarian function. It is based on a good marketing plan. I am currently trying to get the first ever trials on HRT based on actual ovarian function started because I think it is important that this be done.

Thanks,

Beth
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Debra+
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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Hi,

My name is Beth Rosenshein and I am the author of Preventing Menopause.

At one time in my life I too looked forward to menopause. To me, it meant not worrying about birth control. When I realized that something much more than just the end of my periods was happening I began researching what could cause such changes. I was very surprised to see words like ovarian failure and hypogonadism and it made me question how such words could be the same as menopause. At the time this was happening to me I knew that I didn't want my children to suffer the same fate. I still don't. That said, I realize that each person must pick their own journey. I choose a journey that some want to take and others don't. I feel good about the path I took because I understand it.

Is this a normal process? Having experienced it I would say it is as normal as any other part of our body aging. For instance, every person over 50 will need reading glasses. It happens to everyone so it's normal. Do we ignore it? No, we wear glasses. Same thing for our teeth, joints, hearing, etc.

I continue to read the medical literature on menopause and have become accustomed to seeing the words hypogonadism and ovarian failure. It is what it is. So whether we like it or not we've got it and each of us must decide if we want to treat it. I wish I knew all of this before and was better prepared for 'the change'. I wrote my book so that women can have the necessary information to make the choice of treatment or no treatment for themselves. Please understand that I am not a proponent of HRT as it is currently prescribed to women because it is not based on ovarian function. It is based on a good marketing plan. I am currently trying to get the first ever trials on HRT based on actual ovarian function started because I think it is important that this be done.

Thanks,

Beth


What do you mean by this?

Debra



"Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves." C.G. Jung"

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Revision History (1 edits)
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 6:12am
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Vicki
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Is the target audience people who are trying to get pregnant before the clock?
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi Debra,

As we age our entire body ages. It is no surprise that over time our eyes loose the ability to see sharply, so we put on glasses. As our teeth age, we go to a dentist to keep them strong. As our kidneys age we take medication to help them work better. Whether you interpret the failure of the ovaries as predetermined and natural the body does not change its physiology to accomodate this change and so our bodies suffer and begin to feel the effects of hypogonadism. In fact, the brain continues to try to get the ovaries to work for the remainder of our lives by sending out special hormones to stimulate the ovaries. The effects of hypogonadism are felt in every organ system in the body. There are very real unhealthy changes that take place and yet women are told that treatment is unecessary. Men who suffer from testicular failure and have the exact same symptoms as a woman with menopause are routinely counseled to receive treatment because of the health benefits and are given appropriate HRT. The aging process is going to happen. Why single out women to not receive appropriate care for something as significant as hypogonadism?
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi Vicki,

My target audience is all women. I want women to understand what is happening in their bodies as they age and what they can do about it so they can make an informed choice about the treatment they want to receive for hypogonadism (menopause).

Beth
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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 8:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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beyond all this, do I see it correct a fear of aging and a welcoming of anti-aging medicine
to name things like you do, its' a sort of fixing in names ...what we accepted in further times, now it should be converted to sickness or we are called to interact as usual; no more a normal statement of peri- or post-or just menopausal women are accepted...but we have to interfere...every time we have to act...for or against something....hmm do you think that this is healthy
Mostly for the benefits of several firms ....but not for our needs.....when a colleague of mine told me recently to go for HRT...I said to him, I think it's big time to change my doc....
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OSuzanna
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 1:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sam Dan
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Thank you for speaking directly to us, Beth. I appreciate it. Although my final opinion may or may not change, I like to see both sides of a debate.
"...each person must pick their own journey..."   So true, yes?
P.S. I'm gonna hazard a guess the term "ovarian failure" was coined by a male doctor!


OSuzanna
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FOOD for THOUGHT, Super Beneficial 4 All Blood Types!
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Peppermint Twist
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 1:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Age: 52
Beth, as a participant in this discussion, I appreciate your coming here and taking the time to help us understand where you as the author are coming from, and your respectful tone even though some of us (me included) had a very negative reaction to some of the phrases and concepts in your book.  Fair point that the medical literature uses the term "ovarian failure" in describing what happens with the ovaries during menopause, I didn't know that was the term in use.  I am still offended by it and see it as a symptom of patriarchy and a misogynistic point of view infusing all of our language, but that is not your fault as the author of your book, your point is that you are just using the generally-used term.  Point taken.  Although I for one think the term "ovarian failure" is really an unfortunate one and I'm sorry to hear that is how doctors in the field speak and write about what happens during menopause, I mean, what a weird way to phrase a natural end to the productive life of the ovaries.  I don't like it.  But I now get that you didn't make it up, it was already out there.  Thanks for informing us of that.

Now, about comparing the idea of "treating" menopause to something like getting prescription glasses when your vision starts to go (honey, I'm feeling that example!), it isn't quite the same.  Ideally, one's eyes could remain at perfect vision for a lifetime.  So glasses are a "treatment" if this isn't the case...or actually, not a treatment (as they do not improve vision unless they are worn), but a palliative measure.  But unlike vision changes, there is no way that menapause is not going to happen to everyone.  It is as natural as the fact that all women will get periods once they reach a certain point in adolescence.  So I really don't like the title "Preventing Menopause", because that is not possible and, more importantly, not desirable, not something we need to wish we could do.  Nature dictates that we go through menapause, so let's embrace her wisdom!

Bottom line is, I guess it is the phrasing more than anything that I have a problem with.  I mean, I have no problem with a woman taking supplements to balance out the changes going on in the body, or doing other supportive measures to smooth the symptoms of menopause, of course.  But talking about "preventing" it?  That I have a problem with.  And as for the phrase "ovarian failure", I retract my irkedness about that in terms of your book and you using it, as, like I said at the top of this post, you say it is out there and you are just using the accepted language to describe a process.  Fair enough.  I retract what I said about that phrase being in your book, and ADD that I object to that phrase, PERIOD, being the phrase used by the medical establishment to describe the ovaries reaching the end of their productive lives.  They haven't failed, they have done exactly what they were designed to do and have stopped doing it exactly when they were programmed to stop doing it.  That's my whole point there.  I think only a patriarchal, misogynistic medical establishment would come up with "ovarian failure".  And I don't think I'm just being "PC" about semantics, I'm really not like that.  But I do very much think accuracy in language is important and I don't think "ovarian failure" is accurately describing what is happening, as the ovaries are programmed to stop producing eggs at a certain point, so it isn't a failure, it is them doing what they are programmed to do, hence, I see the patriarchal bias in that term and it bugs me royally, what can I tell ya?  If a woman's ovaries were to "fail" in her 20's or 30's, then I think the doctors could use that term, "ovarian failure", as in, "something has gone wrong here".  But to use that term for menopause, for the ovaries natural progression to a non-productive state, I think is inaccurate.  But it isn't your term and thanks again for popping in to clarify that.  I appreciate it and understand now why you used that term in your book.  

But "preventing menopause" as a title?  Why?  Why not "Sailing Through Menopause" or "Smoothing Out the Rough Edges of Menopause" or something...(I know, both of those need work *lol*, but you get my point).  Anyway, thanks again for sharing your point of view with us.  I appreciate it and it has helped me to better understand where you are coming from.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (9 edits; 4 reasons shown)
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:36pm
apparently not, found another place where I spelled it incorrectly...oh, the humanity...
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:35pm
corrected spelling of menopause...man, will I ever be done editing?
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:12pm
aaaand, I accidentally deleted a paragraph space when I deleted the line...I am SO done now...no, really
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:11pm
I know, I know, I need in-patient treatment for over-editing of posts, but I had a totally redundant sentence in there, it had to go!
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I interpret the evolution of the term ovarian failure in the following way. From a medical point of view the physical needs of the body are suddenly not being met so from that point of view it is a failure to deliver, hence the term ovarian failure. That is the way medical vocabulary is structured, liver failure, kidney failure, heart failure, etc.

As for the title of my book, I choose Preventing Menopause for two reasons. First, I wanted to give the information needed to a woman to maintain the health benefits of Ovarian Hormone Replacement (ORT) which is not the HRT that is currently prescribed to women. ORT is based on ovarian function. My goal was to help maintain these health benefits by giving the body what it needed to age at a slower pace than it does without ovarian function. Secondly, I realized early on in my research that the ovaries can function and at the same time be infertile. Hence, preventing menopause through effective treatment  (ORT) or helping the ovaries work longer while being infertile.

Research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is showing that the dramatic increase in breast cancer, approximately 30 fold increase, is caused by the loss of all ovarian hormones, not just estrogen. It is the ovaries and all the hormones they produce, working together, that protect the breast tissue from breast cancer. This information rarely makes it to the news. Research from the NIH is showing that ORT can prevent breast cancer. Remember the 'HRT' that is given to women generally only contains estrogen and estrogen alone will not replace the balance of all of the ovarian hormones.

A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.

The ovaries are not just reproductive organs. They provide very important endocrine function which affect every part of the body, some parts more than others. I had to prove to myself via the research that is available that using ORT had more health benefits. I did that. The same situation arises in men who have testicular failure, and they are routinely effectively treated because their treatment is based on testicular function. Not providing this information to the public I believe creates an unequal access to women to medical care.
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mhameline
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Secondly, I realized early on in my research that the ovaries can function and at the same time be infertile.

A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.



I think this is the catagory I fall into exactly - I'm 33yrs old and for years I didn't ovulate - over the last few years I have stared ovulating again, but even though my ovaries function I am still unable to get pregnant.  I've never been able to understand why I could ovulate and be regular with the length of my periods and still go years with no pregnancy?  



Blessings,
Missy

Married to Kris a B+
Pursuing domestic infant adoption.
Jordan Alexandra - born 5/12/08
Placed in our arms - 5/21/08


Revision History (1 edits)
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:19pm
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semmens
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted Text
Remember the 'HRT' that is given to women generally only contains estrogen and estrogen alone will not replace the balance of all of the ovarian hormones.


I am currently reading a just-published book on menopause ("Is it Hot In Here or Is It Just me?") and they state repeatedly that estrogen alone is given only to women who have had their uterus removed. Since most women in menopause or past it still have a uterus, they are given estrogen PLUS progesterone as HRT. This disputes your staement, right?

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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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oups .... I just have been informed, that in USA more than 30% less of breastcancer patients, because of cessing the HRT's!!!
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Peppermint Twist
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
I interpret the evolution of the term ovarian failure in the following way. From a medical point of view the physical needs of the body are suddenly not being met so from that point of view it is a failure to deliver, hence the term ovarian failure. That is the way medical vocabulary is structured, liver failure, kidney failure, heart failure, etc.

But liver failure, kidney failure, and heart failure are all abnormal.  The ovaries ceasing to be productive at menopause is normal.  That's the difference.  Who are we to say the needs of the body are not being met, when nature designed it that way?  The needs of a fertile woman in her childbearing years are not being met, but the needs of a woman in the next phase are, it could be argued...couldn't it?
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is showing that the dramatic increase in breast cancer, approximately 30 fold increase, is caused by the loss of all ovarian hormones, not just estrogen. It is the ovaries and all the hormones they produce, working together, that protect the breast tissue from breast cancer. This information rarely makes it to the news. Research from the NIH is showing that ORT can prevent breast cancer.

Now THAT is interesting!
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.

This is also very interesting!
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
The ovaries are not just reproductive organs. They provide very important endocrine function which affect every part of the body

Very true, yet they were not designed by nature to continue in the same way after menopause that they do before, so should we mess with that to any great degree?  I don't know.  But you do make some interesting, provocative points.  Thanks again for participating in this thread!!!



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (5 edits; 4 reasons shown)
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:34pm
Weird:  why do I keep spelling "menopause" incorrectly?  Inexplicable.
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:20pm
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:20pm
ironwood55  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:19pm
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mhameline
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I would really be interested in what you've learned about making a woman's ovaries work better who are still in the reproductive phase of life and wanting to get pregnant - specifically ME!!  


Blessings,
Missy

Married to Kris a B+
Pursuing domestic infant adoption.
Jordan Alexandra - born 5/12/08
Placed in our arms - 5/21/08

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funkymuse
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 9:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Wow... I left the Board for a few days when it had 4 entries and now 38!  

I'm surprised that Beth wrote.  How did you find out about this Board Beth?

I read the book and as stated before have given it to my NP to help me work with my personal hormonal balances and imbalances.  I want to work to avoid all those diseases that might come from hormonal imbalance.   They may not come to me but at least I want to do all I can to avoid them.  I know too many whacked out people, men included who are suffering possibly because of hormonal imbalances.  My Mother, my sister and many other personal friends.  And... my husband was suffering (many times during our intimacy times) until he got his hormonal levels tested and adjusted.

Our hormones are really amazing as far as how they affect our health and well-being.  

The information in this book was enough for me to at least want to try.  No harm in that what-so-ever.  

And being that the research is new, there will be people on both sides of the fence debating; and we will each do what we feel to do!

Blessings to all...


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Jane
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 9:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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As someone whose periods didn't stop until I was 58, I'm with you PT, etc.  I tried a very low dose of hormones for one month and got my period for my 60th birthday.  I called the Dr. that day and that that wasn't what I wanted for my 60th birthday.  I took the patch off and never looked back.  Eventually the night sweats stopped on their own.
It's just part of our "life cycle" and NO I wouldn't want to be having periods at 80! !
Jane
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bec-australia
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I'm really interested in this (the book is on order) because I'm starting to go through the beginning stages of ovarian failure at 25.  My doctor is great to work with, so I'll no doubt be taking in the book to discuss with him and look at how it works with the current regime (I'm on high dose progesterone cream to control the endometriosis growth).  

Personally, I'm glad that someone doesn't think that this process is normal.  It was hard at 21 to deal with never being able to have children (the effects of ovarian cysts & endo) but it gets even harder to deal with when suddenly you're dealing with the fact that you could lose ovarian function completely at around 28.
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MyraBee
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In my opinion.....midlife "ovarian failure" Is normal!

Just my opinion---and thanks Beth for posting here.

My.


"We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience." Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
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Victoria
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There's a big difference between stopping periods in one's 50's and having hormone imbalances with endo. when in ones 20's.  I hope you get the successful help that you need Omen&Bec.

Surely these are bio identical hormones.  Is it basically an approach using estrogens and progesterones?  What about testosterone?



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
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Beth_Rosenshein
Friday, January 5, 2007, 7:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi All,

The current regimen for a woman without a uterus is estrogen only. This does not make sense to me because the entire body uses all of the ovarian hormones (estrogen, testosterone, progesterone). The uterus is not the only organ in the body that uses progesterone. In fact, one of the reasons women seek out hormonal therapy is to improve their sleep. There are studies to document that sleep is improved with a combination of bio-identical estradiol (the main hormone from the ovary) and progesterone. This is one example of why treatment with ORT (Ovarian Replacement Therapy) should be independent of whether a woman has a uterus or not.

As for helping the ovaries work better I believe there are ways to do that. The ovaries are in a feedback loop with the brain. This means that if the ovaries produce lower amounts of hormones the brain then sends out stronger signals (FSH goes up) to stimulate the ovaries to produce more. If the ovaries put out more hormones then the brain lowers its stimulation of the ovaries by lowering the FSH level. As we age this feedback loop begins to not work as well. When it doesn't work well the way the eggs are matured is not as efficient as when the feedback loop works well. I believe this in one mechanism that nature put in to lower the fertility of women as they age. Lower fertility means fewer children. Fewer children mean less people to share resources and a better chance there will be enough resources for those children already born. Helping that feedback loop work better will, I believe, result in higher fertility. Believe it or not, one of the hormones that can help this feedback loop work better is testosterone. Testosterone is not a male hormone, it is a human hormone. The ovaries and the testes are gonads and all gonads produce the same sex hormones. I was surprised when I learned that. There is some research at the NIH on this concept and I am keeping an eye on it.

What I discovered from reading studies on ovarian function was that I didn't need to decide if menopause was normal or not. The more important question was “What am I going to do about the condition I am in without the influence of my ovaries.” I couldn't sleep more than 3-4 hours at a time and my husband was fast becoming just a nice man that I was just living with. Whether it was normal or not, I knew I was less healthy because of it and I didn't want to give up good health that easily. I had to prove to myself that this was a healthy thing to do. It was a journey because of all that I had heard about HRT and how unhealthy it was. Still I had to find out why HRT worked in every other area of medicine except this one. The answer was appalling to me. What was being offered as HRT for menopause wasn’t really HRT. While I use ORT and am happy with it, I want to emphasize that treatment is an individual choice. I want women to be able to make an informed decision and not have the decision made for them.

I came to this site after I received an email letting me know that my book was being discussed here. Please let me know if I missed one of your questions.

Beth
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Lola
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you sure are a late sleeper Beth!!! lol

have you had your estradriol and progesterone yet?

(just kidding...)


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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KimonoKat
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Welcome to the forum Beth.

Are you familiar at all with Dr. D'Adamo's work?

I wonder what menopause will be like for future generations of women who have lived and eaten right for their type since birth.



Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.
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Lola
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those will be super generations!!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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KimonoKat
Saturday, January 6, 2007, 12:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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In googling your book, I found this quote:

Quoted Text
The last thing Beth Rosenshein expected to face in her early 40's was premature menopause.

It “was a complete surprise ...a very bad surprise,” she said.


I don't know how recently you wrote your book, or how long it's been since you experienced premature menopause.  But the questions I have would be,

What is your blood type and secretor status?

And, what was, (and currently is) your diet like for the few years surrounding your early onset menopause?


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.

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ironwood55  -  Saturday, January 6, 2007, 12:08am
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funkymuse
Saturday, January 6, 2007, 1:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I know for me... I am not compliant 100% and probably never will be.  I'd have to stay home 24/7 and cook all the time in order to do that.  Being a musician, I do the absolute best I can but it ain't perfect and never will be.  That is the reality I face and if I'm not wrong, many face that same reality.

I know that in the arthritis book Dr. D. himself mentions how his neck and shoulders were getting really tight and so he took at look at really his diet and realized he could be more compliant with more of the beneficials and his diet in general.

Plus being a sugar addict since I was a child (compulsive overeater), any time of regime where I feel restrained or limited or am told I can never have something again, I rebel against.  So I try not to lay any heavy hard core trips on myself like that.  I do try to eat things that make my body feel good and for the most part all of the O foods make me feel good - some actually don't... but occasionally I have a treat that is not under the O guidelines.  

We all have to work with ourselves and our idiosyncrities in all things in life.  

Food is a big one since it affects so much how we feel emotionally and physically.

Some people smoke until they are 90 and die in their sleep.  Others smoke just a little and die of cancer.  Stress is the true killer.  A friend of mine who just had breast cancer surgery was very worried about not being able to have her crispy creme donuts anymore and her doctor told her "if you crispy creme donuts make you happy, eat them."  

It's the happiness that really determines so much of how we react internally.  I ate popcorn for years and years and didn't feel the negative affects and it sure made me damn happy to eat it!  If I eat it now (now that it is on a no no list for me), i feel effects and they aren't good.   Is that because I've now been told that and 'believe it,?" or....because i'm older now and my body can't take it... it's probably alot of things including the blood type science.

The bottom line is I think we have to pull from many sources for our health and well being and we each have to choose what 'we feel' is best for us.
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OSuzanna
Saturday, January 6, 2007, 3:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I feel effects of avoids on me now because I've cleaned up my diet, and an avoid stands out more. Also, it's not all in my head, because I've eaten stuff with avoids unknowingly, and started reactions before finishing the food! Then read the labels on ingredient containers & learned my lesson - read those labels FIRST. Oh well. That said, I love popcorn, but popcorn hates me, and how sick it makes me feel makes it easier to keep my mitts out of the MANY bags that get popped every afternoon in the office! Sigh.


OSuzanna
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Quoted Text
I ate popcorn for years and years and didn't feel the negative affects and it sure made me damn happy to eat it!


Lectin damage can take years before you actually "feel" it, and are aware that you've literally inflammed a good portion of your small intestinal villi.

One of the reasons it takes some so long to be aware of it is because their immune system is literally trying to swim upstream, the load is so hard it's working over time just to maintain a delicate balance.

One of the reasons individuals can immediately telll when they've eaten an avoid is the immune system is functioning at a more efficient level, and is able to sound the alarm so to speak.


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.

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ironwood55  -  Saturday, January 6, 2007, 3:48am
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all good to know!  thanks!
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Quoted from KimonoKat

One of the reasons individuals can immediately telll when they've eaten an avoid is the immune system is functioning at a more efficient level, and is able to sound the alarm so to speak.


Thanks! That makes sense!



OSuzanna
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Beth_Rosenshein
Sunday, January 7, 2007, 6:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Before coming to this message board I had heard of Dr. D’Adamo’s work. I have ordered his book to become more familiar with his recommendations.

It was mentioned that women of the future may have a different experience with menopause and it would appear the future is now. Here is a link to an article that shows women are experiencing menopause at an older age than women just 80 years ago. The author attributes the later age of onset to better nutrition.

http://www.webmd.com/content/article/77/90362.htm
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Vicki
Sunday, January 7, 2007, 7:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Which book did you order?
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from what Beth is saying, I suppose she means the menopause book from Dr D s health series.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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OSuzanna
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Thanks for posting that link, Beth. Also, remember that of any food things listed in the books, the most up-to-date info is here on the site, as in Typebase. For example, in Eat Right 4 Your Type, tho beer was listed as Neutral for O's, updated studies led it to be downgraded to an Avoid for O's. Most of the info stays the same, but I always double-check anyway.


OSuzanna
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MyraBee
Sunday, January 7, 2007, 8:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Before coming to this message board I had heard of Dr. D’Adamo’s work. I have ordered his book to become more familiar with his recommendations.

It was mentioned that women of the future may have a different experience with menopause and it would appear the future is now. Here is a link to an article that shows women are experiencing menopause at an older age than women just 80 years ago. The author attributes the later age of onset to better nutrition.

http://www.webmd.com/content/article/77/90362.htm



I have my own theory--I think it's because of our hormone laden food supply.

Thanks, again, Beth for joining the discussion here.

Love,

Myra


"We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We are spiritual beings having a human experience." Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
http://www.stillspeaking.com

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lstreat
Monday, January 8, 2007, 7:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from MyraBee



I have my own theory--I think it's because of our hormone laden food supply.

Thanks, again, Beth for joining the discussion here.

Love,

Myra



I agree with you on this one Myra.



Warrior: Once you're faced with a challenge, you'll keep ramming a wall until you break through — especially if that challenge is mental. Use your nimble mind and tenacity to conquer life and stick with your GenoType Diet. You're bound to succeed.
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Joyce
Monday, January 8, 2007, 10:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from funkymuse
How To Stop Menopause Before it Starts

!


Admittedly I haven't read the book, and neither am I tempted to do so, because at 61 I can honestly say that not having to bother with hormonal surges and menstruation is one of the really GOOD things about getting older!

Joyce

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Beth_Rosenshein
Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 7:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Here is the book I ordered:

Menopause: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet (Dr. Peter J. D'adamo's Eat Right for Your Type Health Library)

Thank you for letting me know about the additional information on this website. This is all very interesting to me.

Beth
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Debra+
Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 12:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Here is the book I ordered:

Menopause: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet (Dr. Peter J. D'adamo's Eat Right for Your Type Health Library)

Thank you for letting me know about the additional information on this website. This is all very interesting to me.

Beth




Quoted from Beth Rosenshein
Is this a normal process? Having experienced it I would say it is as normal as any other part of our body aging. For instance, every person over 50 will need reading glasses. It happens to everyone so it's normal. Do we ignore it? No, we wear glasses. Same thing for our teeth, joints, hearing, etc.


You may want to pick up the anti-aging book also and see how our foods can help us all.  

Glad to hear that you are interested.

Debra

P.S. And...the Eat Right and the Live Right and the encyclopedia and...I could keep on going.  



"Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves." C.G. Jung"

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KimonoKat
Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 7:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Here is the book I ordered:

Menopause: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet: Fight Its Symptoms with the Blood Type Diet (Dr. Peter J. D'adamo's Eat Right for Your Type Health Library)

Thank you for letting me know about the additional information on this website. This is all very interesting to me.

Beth


Understand that the Healh Library books are adjunct books to Dr. D'Adamo's main books Eat Right 4 Your Type, and Live Right 4 Your Type.  In these books, Dr. D'Adamo goes into detail outlining lectin theory, the effect of polyamines in the body, as well as how "gene linkage" most likely plays a role in determining the level of stomach acid produced by the different blood types, different brain chemicals and the breast cancer gene discovered in 1984.

I would also consider spending some time reading Dr. D's wiki, The Individualist where you can find a considerable amout of scientific evidence to support his theories.

Maybe in time you will share your blood type with us, and what your diet, stress levels, and exercise regemin has been like.  It would also be interesting to know, if, (and if you were willing to share it) as a bio-medical engineer, if at any time in your work career you were exposed to chemical agents, and for how long a period.


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.
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Beth_Rosenshein
Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 7:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks for all of the information. I look forward to learning more about this topic. As for chemical exposure, I am very fortunate that I haven't had any.
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  ›  Preventing Menopause

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