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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi,

My name is Beth Rosenshein and I am the author of Preventing Menopause.

At one time in my life I too looked forward to menopause. To me, it meant not worrying about birth control. When I realized that something much more than just the end of my periods was happening I began researching what could cause such changes. I was very surprised to see words like ovarian failure and hypogonadism and it made me question how such words could be the same as menopause. At the time this was happening to me I knew that I didn't want my children to suffer the same fate. I still don't. That said, I realize that each person must pick their own journey. I choose a journey that some want to take and others don't. I feel good about the path I took because I understand it.

Is this a normal process? Having experienced it I would say it is as normal as any other part of our body aging. For instance, every person over 50 will need reading glasses. It happens to everyone so it's normal. Do we ignore it? No, we wear glasses. Same thing for our teeth, joints, hearing, etc.

I continue to read the medical literature on menopause and have become accustomed to seeing the words hypogonadism and ovarian failure. It is what it is. So whether we like it or not we've got it and each of us must decide if we want to treat it. I wish I knew all of this before and was better prepared for 'the change'. I wrote my book so that women can have the necessary information to make the choice of treatment or no treatment for themselves. Please understand that I am not a proponent of HRT as it is currently prescribed to women because it is not based on ovarian function. It is based on a good marketing plan. I am currently trying to get the first ever trials on HRT based on actual ovarian function started because I think it is important that this be done.

Thanks,

Beth
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Debra+
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 6:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Hi,

My name is Beth Rosenshein and I am the author of Preventing Menopause.

At one time in my life I too looked forward to menopause. To me, it meant not worrying about birth control. When I realized that something much more than just the end of my periods was happening I began researching what could cause such changes. I was very surprised to see words like ovarian failure and hypogonadism and it made me question how such words could be the same as menopause. At the time this was happening to me I knew that I didn't want my children to suffer the same fate. I still don't. That said, I realize that each person must pick their own journey. I choose a journey that some want to take and others don't. I feel good about the path I took because I understand it.

Is this a normal process? Having experienced it I would say it is as normal as any other part of our body aging. For instance, every person over 50 will need reading glasses. It happens to everyone so it's normal. Do we ignore it? No, we wear glasses. Same thing for our teeth, joints, hearing, etc.

I continue to read the medical literature on menopause and have become accustomed to seeing the words hypogonadism and ovarian failure. It is what it is. So whether we like it or not we've got it and each of us must decide if we want to treat it. I wish I knew all of this before and was better prepared for 'the change'. I wrote my book so that women can have the necessary information to make the choice of treatment or no treatment for themselves. Please understand that I am not a proponent of HRT as it is currently prescribed to women because it is not based on ovarian function. It is based on a good marketing plan. I am currently trying to get the first ever trials on HRT based on actual ovarian function started because I think it is important that this be done.

Thanks,

Beth


What do you mean by this?

Debra



"Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves." C.G. Jung"

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Revision History (1 edits)
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 6:12am
fixed
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Vicki
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Is the target audience people who are trying to get pregnant before the clock?
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi Debra,

As we age our entire body ages. It is no surprise that over time our eyes loose the ability to see sharply, so we put on glasses. As our teeth age, we go to a dentist to keep them strong. As our kidneys age we take medication to help them work better. Whether you interpret the failure of the ovaries as predetermined and natural the body does not change its physiology to accomodate this change and so our bodies suffer and begin to feel the effects of hypogonadism. In fact, the brain continues to try to get the ovaries to work for the remainder of our lives by sending out special hormones to stimulate the ovaries. The effects of hypogonadism are felt in every organ system in the body. There are very real unhealthy changes that take place and yet women are told that treatment is unecessary. Men who suffer from testicular failure and have the exact same symptoms as a woman with menopause are routinely counseled to receive treatment because of the health benefits and are given appropriate HRT. The aging process is going to happen. Why single out women to not receive appropriate care for something as significant as hypogonadism?
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 7:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi Vicki,

My target audience is all women. I want women to understand what is happening in their bodies as they age and what they can do about it so they can make an informed choice about the treatment they want to receive for hypogonadism (menopause).

Beth
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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 8:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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beyond all this, do I see it correct a fear of aging and a welcoming of anti-aging medicine
to name things like you do, its' a sort of fixing in names ...what we accepted in further times, now it should be converted to sickness or we are called to interact as usual; no more a normal statement of peri- or post-or just menopausal women are accepted...but we have to interfere...every time we have to act...for or against something....hmm do you think that this is healthy
Mostly for the benefits of several firms ....but not for our needs.....when a colleague of mine told me recently to go for HRT...I said to him, I think it's big time to change my doc....
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OSuzanna
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 1:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you for speaking directly to us, Beth. I appreciate it. Although my final opinion may or may not change, I like to see both sides of a debate.
"...each person must pick their own journey..."   So true, yes?
P.S. I'm gonna hazard a guess the term "ovarian failure" was coined by a male doctor!


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Peppermint Twist
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 1:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Beth, as a participant in this discussion, I appreciate your coming here and taking the time to help us understand where you as the author are coming from, and your respectful tone even though some of us (me included) had a very negative reaction to some of the phrases and concepts in your book.  Fair point that the medical literature uses the term "ovarian failure" in describing what happens with the ovaries during menopause, I didn't know that was the term in use.  I am still offended by it and see it as a symptom of patriarchy and a misogynistic point of view infusing all of our language, but that is not your fault as the author of your book, your point is that you are just using the generally-used term.  Point taken.  Although I for one think the term "ovarian failure" is really an unfortunate one and I'm sorry to hear that is how doctors in the field speak and write about what happens during menopause, I mean, what a weird way to phrase a natural end to the productive life of the ovaries.  I don't like it.  But I now get that you didn't make it up, it was already out there.  Thanks for informing us of that.

Now, about comparing the idea of "treating" menopause to something like getting prescription glasses when your vision starts to go (honey, I'm feeling that example!), it isn't quite the same.  Ideally, one's eyes could remain at perfect vision for a lifetime.  So glasses are a "treatment" if this isn't the case...or actually, not a treatment (as they do not improve vision unless they are worn), but a palliative measure.  But unlike vision changes, there is no way that menapause is not going to happen to everyone.  It is as natural as the fact that all women will get periods once they reach a certain point in adolescence.  So I really don't like the title "Preventing Menopause", because that is not possible and, more importantly, not desirable, not something we need to wish we could do.  Nature dictates that we go through menapause, so let's embrace her wisdom!

Bottom line is, I guess it is the phrasing more than anything that I have a problem with.  I mean, I have no problem with a woman taking supplements to balance out the changes going on in the body, or doing other supportive measures to smooth the symptoms of menopause, of course.  But talking about "preventing" it?  That I have a problem with.  And as for the phrase "ovarian failure", I retract my irkedness about that in terms of your book and you using it, as, like I said at the top of this post, you say it is out there and you are just using the accepted language to describe a process.  Fair enough.  I retract what I said about that phrase being in your book, and ADD that I object to that phrase, PERIOD, being the phrase used by the medical establishment to describe the ovaries reaching the end of their productive lives.  They haven't failed, they have done exactly what they were designed to do and have stopped doing it exactly when they were programmed to stop doing it.  That's my whole point there.  I think only a patriarchal, misogynistic medical establishment would come up with "ovarian failure".  And I don't think I'm just being "PC" about semantics, I'm really not like that.  But I do very much think accuracy in language is important and I don't think "ovarian failure" is accurately describing what is happening, as the ovaries are programmed to stop producing eggs at a certain point, so it isn't a failure, it is them doing what they are programmed to do, hence, I see the patriarchal bias in that term and it bugs me royally, what can I tell ya?  If a woman's ovaries were to "fail" in her 20's or 30's, then I think the doctors could use that term, "ovarian failure", as in, "something has gone wrong here".  But to use that term for menopause, for the ovaries natural progression to a non-productive state, I think is inaccurate.  But it isn't your term and thanks again for popping in to clarify that.  I appreciate it and understand now why you used that term in your book.  

But "preventing menopause" as a title?  Why?  Why not "Sailing Through Menopause" or "Smoothing Out the Rough Edges of Menopause" or something...(I know, both of those need work *lol*, but you get my point).  Anyway, thanks again for sharing your point of view with us.  I appreciate it and it has helped me to better understand where you are coming from.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (9 edits; 4 reasons shown)
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:36pm
apparently not, found another place where I spelled it incorrectly...oh, the humanity...
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:35pm
corrected spelling of menopause...man, will I ever be done editing?
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:12pm
aaaand, I accidentally deleted a paragraph space when I deleted the line...I am SO done now...no, really
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 2:11pm
I know, I know, I need in-patient treatment for over-editing of posts, but I had a totally redundant sentence in there, it had to go!
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Beth_Rosenshein
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 3:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I interpret the evolution of the term ovarian failure in the following way. From a medical point of view the physical needs of the body are suddenly not being met so from that point of view it is a failure to deliver, hence the term ovarian failure. That is the way medical vocabulary is structured, liver failure, kidney failure, heart failure, etc.

As for the title of my book, I choose Preventing Menopause for two reasons. First, I wanted to give the information needed to a woman to maintain the health benefits of Ovarian Hormone Replacement (ORT) which is not the HRT that is currently prescribed to women. ORT is based on ovarian function. My goal was to help maintain these health benefits by giving the body what it needed to age at a slower pace than it does without ovarian function. Secondly, I realized early on in my research that the ovaries can function and at the same time be infertile. Hence, preventing menopause through effective treatment  (ORT) or helping the ovaries work longer while being infertile.

Research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is showing that the dramatic increase in breast cancer, approximately 30 fold increase, is caused by the loss of all ovarian hormones, not just estrogen. It is the ovaries and all the hormones they produce, working together, that protect the breast tissue from breast cancer. This information rarely makes it to the news. Research from the NIH is showing that ORT can prevent breast cancer. Remember the 'HRT' that is given to women generally only contains estrogen and estrogen alone will not replace the balance of all of the ovarian hormones.

A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.

The ovaries are not just reproductive organs. They provide very important endocrine function which affect every part of the body, some parts more than others. I had to prove to myself via the research that is available that using ORT had more health benefits. I did that. The same situation arises in men who have testicular failure, and they are routinely effectively treated because their treatment is based on testicular function. Not providing this information to the public I believe creates an unequal access to women to medical care.
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mhameline
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Secondly, I realized early on in my research that the ovaries can function and at the same time be infertile.

A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.



I think this is the catagory I fall into exactly - I'm 33yrs old and for years I didn't ovulate - over the last few years I have stared ovulating again, but even though my ovaries function I am still unable to get pregnant.  I've never been able to understand why I could ovulate and be regular with the length of my periods and still go years with no pregnancy?  



Blessings,
Missy

Married to Kris a B+
Pursuing domestic infant adoption.
Jordan Alexandra - born 5/12/08
Placed in our arms - 5/21/08


Revision History (1 edits)
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:19pm
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semmens
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted Text
Remember the 'HRT' that is given to women generally only contains estrogen and estrogen alone will not replace the balance of all of the ovarian hormones.


I am currently reading a just-published book on menopause ("Is it Hot In Here or Is It Just me?") and they state repeatedly that estrogen alone is given only to women who have had their uterus removed. Since most women in menopause or past it still have a uterus, they are given estrogen PLUS progesterone as HRT. This disputes your staement, right?

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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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oups .... I just have been informed, that in USA more than 30% less of breastcancer patients, because of cessing the HRT's!!!
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Peppermint Twist
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
I interpret the evolution of the term ovarian failure in the following way. From a medical point of view the physical needs of the body are suddenly not being met so from that point of view it is a failure to deliver, hence the term ovarian failure. That is the way medical vocabulary is structured, liver failure, kidney failure, heart failure, etc.

But liver failure, kidney failure, and heart failure are all abnormal.  The ovaries ceasing to be productive at menopause is normal.  That's the difference.  Who are we to say the needs of the body are not being met, when nature designed it that way?  The needs of a fertile woman in her childbearing years are not being met, but the needs of a woman in the next phase are, it could be argued...couldn't it?
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
Research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is showing that the dramatic increase in breast cancer, approximately 30 fold increase, is caused by the loss of all ovarian hormones, not just estrogen. It is the ovaries and all the hormones they produce, working together, that protect the breast tissue from breast cancer. This information rarely makes it to the news. Research from the NIH is showing that ORT can prevent breast cancer.

Now THAT is interesting!
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
A by product of my research was that I realized that while women are still reproductive they could improve their chances of getting pregnant and potentially reduce the risk of birth defects by helping their ovaries work better. There is very little research in this area which is too bad because it could positively affect many lives.

This is also very interesting!
Quoted from Beth_Rosenshein
The ovaries are not just reproductive organs. They provide very important endocrine function which affect every part of the body

Very true, yet they were not designed by nature to continue in the same way after menopause that they do before, so should we mess with that to any great degree?  I don't know.  But you do make some interesting, provocative points.  Thanks again for participating in this thread!!!



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Revision History (5 edits; 4 reasons shown)
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:34pm
Weird:  why do I keep spelling "menopause" incorrectly?  Inexplicable.
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:20pm
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:20pm
debra  -  Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:19pm
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mhameline
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 5:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I would really be interested in what you've learned about making a woman's ovaries work better who are still in the reproductive phase of life and wanting to get pregnant - specifically ME!!  


Blessings,
Missy

Married to Kris a B+
Pursuing domestic infant adoption.
Jordan Alexandra - born 5/12/08
Placed in our arms - 5/21/08

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funkymuse
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 9:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Wow... I left the Board for a few days when it had 4 entries and now 38!  

I'm surprised that Beth wrote.  How did you find out about this Board Beth?

I read the book and as stated before have given it to my NP to help me work with my personal hormonal balances and imbalances.  I want to work to avoid all those diseases that might come from hormonal imbalance.   They may not come to me but at least I want to do all I can to avoid them.  I know too many whacked out people, men included who are suffering possibly because of hormonal imbalances.  My Mother, my sister and many other personal friends.  And... my husband was suffering (many times during our intimacy times) until he got his hormonal levels tested and adjusted.

Our hormones are really amazing as far as how they affect our health and well-being.  

The information in this book was enough for me to at least want to try.  No harm in that what-so-ever.  

And being that the research is new, there will be people on both sides of the fence debating; and we will each do what we feel to do!

Blessings to all...


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Jane
Thursday, January 4, 2007, 9:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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As someone whose periods didn't stop until I was 58, I'm with you PT, etc.  I tried a very low dose of hormones for one month and got my period for my 60th birthday.  I called the Dr. that day and that that wasn't what I wanted for my 60th birthday.  I took the patch off and never looked back.  Eventually the night sweats stopped on their own.
It's just part of our "life cycle" and NO I wouldn't want to be having periods at 80! !
Jane
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I'm really interested in this (the book is on order) because I'm starting to go through the beginning stages of ovarian failure at 25.  My doctor is great to work with, so I'll no doubt be taking in the book to discuss with him and look at how it works with the current regime (I'm on high dose progesterone cream to control the endometriosis growth).  

Personally, I'm glad that someone doesn't think that this process is normal.  It was hard at 21 to deal with never being able to have children (the effects of ovarian cysts & endo) but it gets even harder to deal with when suddenly you're dealing with the fact that you could lose ovarian function completely at around 28.
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In my opinion.....midlife "ovarian failure" Is normal!

Just my opinion---and thanks Beth for posting here.

My.


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There's a big difference between stopping periods in one's 50's and having hormone imbalances with endo. when in ones 20's.  I hope you get the successful help that you need Omen&Bec.

Surely these are bio identical hormones.  Is it basically an approach using estrogens and progesterones?  What about testosterone?



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Beth_Rosenshein
Friday, January 5, 2007, 7:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi All,

The current regimen for a woman without a uterus is estrogen only. This does not make sense to me because the entire body uses all of the ovarian hormones (estrogen, testosterone, progesterone). The uterus is not the only organ in the body that uses progesterone. In fact, one of the reasons women seek out hormonal therapy is to improve their sleep. There are studies to document that sleep is improved with a combination of bio-identical estradiol (the main hormone from the ovary) and progesterone. This is one example of why treatment with ORT (Ovarian Replacement Therapy) should be independent of whether a woman has a uterus or not.

As for helping the ovaries work better I believe there are ways to do that. The ovaries are in a feedback loop with the brain. This means that if the ovaries produce lower amounts of hormones the brain then sends out stronger signals (FSH goes up) to stimulate the ovaries to produce more. If the ovaries put out more hormones then the brain lowers its stimulation of the ovaries by lowering the FSH level. As we age this feedback loop begins to not work as well. When it doesn't work well the way the eggs are matured is not as efficient as when the feedback loop works well. I believe this in one mechanism that nature put in to lower the fertility of women as they age. Lower fertility means fewer children. Fewer children mean less people to share resources and a better chance there will be enough resources for those children already born. Helping that feedback loop work better will, I believe, result in higher fertility. Believe it or not, one of the hormones that can help this feedback loop work better is testosterone. Testosterone is not a male hormone, it is a human hormone. The ovaries and the testes are gonads and all gonads produce the same sex hormones. I was surprised when I learned that. There is some research at the NIH on this concept and I am keeping an eye on it.

What I discovered from reading studies on ovarian function was that I didn't need to decide if menopause was normal or not. The more important question was “What am I going to do about the condition I am in without the influence of my ovaries.” I couldn't sleep more than 3-4 hours at a time and my husband was fast becoming just a nice man that I was just living with. Whether it was normal or not, I knew I was less healthy because of it and I didn't want to give up good health that easily. I had to prove to myself that this was a healthy thing to do. It was a journey because of all that I had heard about HRT and how unhealthy it was. Still I had to find out why HRT worked in every other area of medicine except this one. The answer was appalling to me. What was being offered as HRT for menopause wasn’t really HRT. While I use ORT and am happy with it, I want to emphasize that treatment is an individual choice. I want women to be able to make an informed decision and not have the decision made for them.

I came to this site after I received an email letting me know that my book was being discussed here. Please let me know if I missed one of your questions.

Beth
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Lola
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you sure are a late sleeper Beth!!! lol

have you had your estradriol and progesterone yet?

(just kidding...)


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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KimonoKat
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Welcome to the forum Beth.

Are you familiar at all with Dr. D'Adamo's work?

I wonder what menopause will be like for future generations of women who have lived and eaten right for their type since birth.



Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.
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those will be super generations!!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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KimonoKat
Saturday, January 6, 2007, 12:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

38% HUNTER
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 4,673
Gender: Female
Location: Sherman Oaks, California
In googling your book, I found this quote:

Quoted Text
The last thing Beth Rosenshein expected to face in her early 40's was premature menopause.

It “was a complete surprise ...a very bad surprise,” she said.


I don't know how recently you wrote your book, or how long it's been since you experienced premature menopause.  But the questions I have would be,

What is your blood type and secretor status?

And, what was, (and currently is) your diet like for the few years surrounding your early onset menopause?


Knowledge is power.  SWAMI gives you the diet that will unlock the key to better health, and it's all based on your unique individuality.

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debra  -  Saturday, January 6, 2007, 12:08am
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  ›  Preventing Menopause

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