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Millet help  This thread currently has 760 views. Print Print Thread
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Possum
Sunday, February 23, 2014, 9:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from ginnyTN
The pre ground millet flour can have a slightly bitter taste, but to me using whole millet that has been rinsed off and then dried thoroughly and then ground is way too much work to think about.
That bitterness would be the saponins - the natural pesticide which is very high (particularly) in certain grains (quinoa for one) and even some sea life... And is the reason it is extra important to soak and re-soak, before cooking until the water is no longer soapy and frothy...

Munchkin - I sometimes throw millet in the rice maker but more often than not I just add it to the stew/casserole I am making for my Hunter husband... It cooks very quickly and thickens nicely!!

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Victoria
Sunday, February 23, 2014, 9:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Possum
That bitterness would be the saponins - the natural pesticide which is very high (particularly) in certain grains (quinoa for one) and even some sea life... And is the reason it is extra important to soak and re-soak, before cooking until the water is no longer soapy and frothy...


I'm no longer eating millet, for various reasons.  But I prepared it for years and always soaked it overnight, then rinsed and drained it well in the morning.

Then, I dumped the grains into a medium/medium pre-heated heavy skillet and stirred them constantly.  They start making popping sounds and eventually stop popping.  At that point, I'd transfer them from the skillet into a pot containing about 3 x the amount of water or broth as the amount of grain and some good quality sea salt.  I would have the liquid already heated, but short of boiling, so that it didn't boil over when the hot grain was added.

This is more liquid than most recipes call for, but I liked it more moist.  I would cover and simmer until the liquid was absorbed, then remove from the heat and let sit, still covered, for another 10 minutes, minimum.



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ginnyTN
Sunday, February 23, 2014, 11:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Munchkin,

Let us know if you were able to fry the millet.  Every time in the past I tried that it softened up and went back to the "porridge" or polenta state.  That was fine with me because I like it that way.

It is possible that it could set up enough to be fried if you use a lot less water than I do when you originally cook it.  Looking forward to your report.  

Ginny


6 years on ER BTD, went from sick and dying to healthier And 30 pounds slimmer.  

Dec 2013: Started Swami Xpress - I'm 48% Explorer with hybridized Explorer/BTD list. A new adventure for this old lady!  -- LOST 5 more pounds on SWAMI! 
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Munchkin76
Monday, February 24, 2014, 7:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ginnyTN
Munchkin,

Let us know if you were able to fry the millet.  Every time in the past I tried that it softened up and went back to the "porridge" or polenta state.  That was fine with me because I like it that way.

It is possible that it could set up enough to be fried if you use a lot less water than I do when you originally cook it.  Looking forward to your report.  

Ginny


Hi Ginny

As per Victoria and Possum's comments, I soaked the millet for a few hours then rinsed it several times till the water ran clear. I then heated it in the pot to dry it out/toast it slightly (ala Victoria's way) and then added 2.5 times the volume (liquid:millet) of (hot) good vegetable stock, a pinch of pink Himalayan salt, and a dash of turmeric. Once boiling. I covered the pot tightly (I put a tea towel between the lid and the pot and jammed it on to get a tight seal), turned the heat to the lowest setting and simmered, covered for 15 mins. After 15 mins take off the heat and leave to stand (still covered) to steam for at least another 10 mins or more. It's important not to peek or uncover the millet until at least the 25 mins (total time) is up. This is the Japanese way of cooking rice (obviously using only water) and the way I do brown basmati and quinoa too.

It was firm enough for me to cut a square out to put in the pan without falling apart. However, it was still a bit crumbly, so in the end I just smooshed it up in the pan and cracked my egg right into the middle of it to cook. Was delish!

So I'm afraid, no new polenta marvel with this experiment.

Andy


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

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Munchkin76
Monday, February 24, 2014, 7:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Possum
That bitterness would be the saponins - the natural pesticide which is very high (particularly) in certain grains (quinoa for one) and even some sea life... And is the reason it is extra important to soak and re-soak, before cooking until the water is no longer soapy and frothy...

Munchkin - I sometimes throw millet in the rice maker but more often than not I just add it to the stew/casserole I am making for my Hunter husband... It cooks very quickly and thickens nicely!!



Thanks Poss, I duly soak and rinse. Good reminder though about grains and soaking.

I'll try throwing some into my next soup or stew recipe, thanks!!

Andy


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

Andy Pandy��


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Munchkin76
Monday, February 24, 2014, 7:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami: Hunter (66%) / RH- / ENFJ / Libra-Dragon
Ee Dan
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Location: Colchester, UK
Age: 37
Quoted from Victoria


I'm no longer eating millet, for various reasons.  But I prepared it for years and always soaked it overnight, then rinsed and drained it well in the morning.

Then, I dumped the grains into a medium/medium pre-heated heavy skillet and stirred them constantly.  They start making popping sounds and eventually stop popping.  At that point, I'd transfer them from the skillet into a pot containing about 3 x the amount of water or broth as the amount of grain and some good quality sea salt.  I would have the liquid already heated, but short of boiling, so that it didn't boil over when the hot grain was added.

This is more liquid than most recipes call for, but I liked it more moist.  I would cover and simmer until the liquid was absorbed, then remove from the heat and let sit, still covered, for another 10 minutes, minimum.


Thanks Victoria - great minds! This is almost identical to the way I prepare it!


Listen to all, plucking a feather from every passing goose, but follow no one absolutely. CHINESE PROVERB

Andy Pandy��


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ginnyTN
Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 4:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

76 and still going
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Thanks to all for sharing your cooking methods!  I've been using millet "flour" so obviously can't soak and drain it but when the flour is gone I will buy the whole seeds so I can rinse them like I do with quinoa.

I sort of suspected that perhaps millet might be coated with saponins like quinoa is and that was maybe why the flour tastes sort of bitter.  


6 years on ER BTD, went from sick and dying to healthier And 30 pounds slimmer.  

Dec 2013: Started Swami Xpress - I'm 48% Explorer with hybridized Explorer/BTD list. A new adventure for this old lady!  -- LOST 5 more pounds on SWAMI! 
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