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Cookie Cooking Expert Needed  This thread currently has 569 views. Print Print Thread
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BluesSinger
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 8:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Ok so I make these cookies and they came out rather dry and kind of crumbly. But I substituted some ingredients.  Can one of the Cookie Cooking Experts tell me what I did wrong or if substituting caused these cookies to turn out this way?  Also I am cooking on pottery baking pans not metal.. could that make a difference in cooking time?  Both sets of cookies kind of got burnt on the bottoms and were done way sooner than the recipe told me to bake them for.

Teff Peanut Butter Cookies
1-1/2 Cups Teff Flour
1/2 Tsp. Sea Salt
1/2 Cup Maple Syrup (I used Agave)
1/2 Cup Canola Oil (I used Walnut)
1 tsp. Vanilla
1 Cup Peanut Butter (I used Almond)


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Drea  -  Monday, April 29, 2013, 2:36am
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ruthiegirl
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 9:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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My first thought would be the temperature of your oven- perhaps your oven is hotter than it *should be*? Also, are you at a high elevation? I've heard that it's necessary to bake at lower temperatures, for longer periods of time, at higher elevations, but I have no personal experience with that. I've only live in Long Island NY, and Baltimore and Silver Spring Maryland. (And DE for a time, but not when I was doing any serious cooking.)

I know that agave burns faster than sugar, but I'm not sure how it compares to maple syrup.

Also, small cookies bake faster than  big ones- is it possible you made your cookies smaller than the recipe recommended?


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Brighid45
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 9:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Nut oils and butters burn very easily, so I would suggest taking the oven temperature down to 325-350F. You might also try raising the rack up one level, if the bottoms are burnt.

I'd suggest you experiment a bit to see what size the cookies should be--depending on your oven, they may need to be a little smaller or a little bigger. I've found making smaller cookies and baking them at a lower temperature helps keep the chance of burning down to a minimum. Hope this is helpful


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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BluesSinger
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 10:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Brighid45
Nut oils and butters burn very easily, so I would suggest taking the oven temperature down to 325-350F. You might also try raising the rack up one level, if the bottoms are burnt.

I'd suggest you experiment a bit to see what size the cookies should be--depending on your oven, they may need to be a little smaller or a little bigger. I've found making smaller cookies and baking them at a lower temperature helps keep the chance of burning down to a minimum. Hope this is helpful


Thank you!.  Well maybe I should use the Maple syrup and use Rice Bran Oil... I'll try that next time.  The cookies are definitely too crumbly as well as lowering the oven temp.
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ruthiegirl
Monday, April 29, 2013, 1:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Cookies often get too crumbly when they're overcooked and dry out. The exact same batter might have been less crumbly if it hadn't baked as long.

In the future, it's always a good idea to check on things SOONER than the recipe suggests. If it says "30-40 minutes" I'll set the timer for 25 minutes, check on it, and then reset the timer for more time if needed. For a 10 minute cookie recipe, I'd probably check on it after 6 or 7 minutes the first time I make a new recipe.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 1:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
Cookies often get too crumbly when they're overcooked and dry out. The exact same batter might have been less crumbly if it hadn't baked as long.

In the future, it's always a good idea to check on things SOONER than the recipe suggests. If it says "30-40 minutes" I'll set the timer for 25 minutes, check on it, and then reset the timer for more time if needed. For a 10 minute cookie recipe, I'd probably check on it after 6 or 7 minutes the first time I make a new recipe.


thank you!
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Rodney
Monday, April 29, 2013, 1:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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first thought if you can tolerate it would be to add an egg and chill the dough 30 - 60 minutes before cooking them. and as mentioned check them and take them out of the oven earlier.
Hi all
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Enobattar
Monday, April 29, 2013, 2:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BluesSinger
Also I am cooking on pottery baking pans not metal.. could that make a difference in cooking time?


Besides all the other great tips above, concerning your cookie sheet not being metal.... it is best (I have read) to preheat the ceramic.  Simply pop it into the oven while it is preheating.  Following this procedure allows the cookie to cook at about the same time period if using metal sheets.

I like to use ceramic (pottery?) because there is less of a chance of burning the bottoms if you happen to forget to check them on time.



Romans 5:1-11  

BTD since 1997, GTD since 2007, SWAMI since 2011, Compliant since 3/13   Husband A+ sec.
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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 2:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Rodney
first thought if you can tolerate it would be to add an egg and chill the dough 30 - 60 minutes before cooking them. and as mentioned check them and take them out of the oven earlier.
Hi all


I was wondering about this!  Yes I can have eggs... so what exactly would the egg do?
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Chloe
Monday, April 29, 2013, 3:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Ruthie is right about agave burning easily and the need to lower the baking temperature by about
25 degrees. The highest I bake my cookies when I use agave is 325.  And I agree....roll your cookie
balls smaller and tighter and press down with a glass or your hand to flatten them a bit. Without
any baking powder or baking soda, they won't rise.....

And walnut oil really shouldn't be used for baking or heating.  Best reserved for salads.  I would choose another oil for baking cookies.

Walnut Oil - This expensive, delicate, light-colored, unrefined, specialty oil is generally made in the Perigord and Burgundy regions of France. Unlike other nut oils, unrefined walnut oil is made from nuts that are dried and then cold-pressed. Walnut oil is high in polyunsaturated fats.

It has a rich, nutty flavor that is perfect for salad dressings, to flavor fish and steaks, to toss with pasta, and to jazz up desserts.

Walnut oil is best used uncooked or in cold sauces because when it is heated, it can become slightly bitter. This flavor, however, can be a pleasant taste when experienced in moderation.

Unrefined walnut oil is terrific on salads, particularly when you combine it with bits of walnuts. Add walnut oil to a chicken or turkey salad along with some grapes and chopped walnuts. Brush a thin coat of walnut oil on grilled fish and steaks just before serving. Toss freshly cooked pasta in a mixture of walnut oil and spices. Try using walnut oil in dessert recipes that will be enhanced by the nutty flavor.


An egg is binding and holds ingredients together but if you add more liquid from one egg, you might have to increase the flour a bit.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Spring
Monday, April 29, 2013, 4:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I agree with Rodney about adding an egg. Here is a link to some substitutions:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/449394-can-i-bake-cake-or-cookies-without-eggs/


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Ribbit
Monday, April 29, 2013, 4:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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An egg will save your cookies.  When at all possible, bake with eggs.  It will solve your crumble problem.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

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Jane
Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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I make the almond butter brownies and blondies from Elana's Pantry and I always have to reduce the cooking time or they come out too dry.  These are made with almond butter, eggs, agave, chocolate chips, baking soda, sea salt and cocoa for the brownies.  I make them in a pyrex 9x14 baking dish.
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amyflood
Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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i would add some egg and maybe some ground flax to help hold the cookie together. I also use butter to make cookies with. i only use 1 stick even if i am making a huge batch (5 dozen). teh flas helps to add oil too.
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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 11:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe
Ruthie is right about agave burning easily and the need to lower the baking temperature by about
25 degrees. The highest I bake my cookies when I use agave is 325.  And I agree....roll your cookie
balls smaller and tighter and press down with a glass or your hand to flatten them a bit. Without
any baking powder or baking soda, they won't rise.....

And walnut oil really shouldn't be used for baking or heating.  Best reserved for salads.  I would choose another oil for baking cookies.

Walnut oil is best used uncooked or in cold sauces because when it is heated, it can become slightly bitter. This flavor, however, can be a pleasant taste when experienced in moderation.



Hi Chole.. thanks for the tips.. however I did check my Walnut oil before I used it and I used a Expeller Pressed REFINED Walnut Oil by Spectrum and it says right on the bottle For Medium High Heat and Baking.

I am very happy however to learn about the Agave and from now on will use another form of sweetener or lower the temp!  But this cookbook does not say to do that and in face uses Agave in  many of it's recipes so one would hope that she adjusted the recipes for the Agave usage.

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cajun
Monday, April 29, 2013, 11:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I agree with many of those above.
I am a cookie monster...really...they are my guilty pleasure. Since the BTD/GTD/SWAMI I have adapted many of my favorite recipes.

I always use butter.
I always bake on metal sheets.
I use eggs.
I bake for a shorter time than any recipe calls for....and add a pinch more flour due to my altitude (3500 feet)
I almost always bake at 350 degrees.
I use brown rice flour, or almond flour, or almond meal...no gums or arrowroot or starches.
I use honey, or maple syrup, or molasses.....sometimes, raw sugar.


 Ao  ISFJ   Taster   Rh+  

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prunella
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 1:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I am new to BTD, although not new to gluten free baking.  
I agree about lowering the oven temp. I use almond flour, a tiny bit of rice flour, agave,  grape seed or olive oil, although butter works well. No gums or starches. Often I add chopped dark chocolate.

I find that GF doughs can seem pretty greasy before baking. I am nearly always tempted to add rice flour to soak up some of the oil. It is easy to add too much rice flour and create dry cookies.  

One thing I do that no one has mentioned is that I use baking parchment on metal cookie sheets. This seems to help to bake evenly.

Also, I mix up very large batches of dough and create slice-and-bake logs of it, which I wrap in waxed paper or plastic wrap. If using waxed paper I put the rolls in a large ziploc bag. Sometimes I roll the entire log in chopped pecans or walnuts.
Then I refrigerate or freeze the logs before slicing to bake. The rolls need to thaw about 20 minutes before slicing. I love having several rolls stashed for munchy attack moments.




The sun, with all those planets around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.

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Ribbit
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 2:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Munchy attack moments.   Good term for it.

I agree, parchment paper seems to help.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Spring
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 5:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from prunella
Also, I mix up very large batches of dough and create slice-and-bake logs of it, which I wrap in waxed paper or plastic wrap. If using waxed paper I put the rolls in a large ziploc bag. Sometimes I roll the entire log in chopped pecans or walnuts.
Then I refrigerate or freeze the logs before slicing to bake. The rolls need to thaw about 20 minutes before slicing. I love having several rolls stashed for munchy attack moments.

I have done this in the past, and cookies kept in the freezer like this are sooo delicious when you just need a few or a lot for a crowd! I have been thinking about getting back in the habit, and you are a good motivator!!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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san j
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 5:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from prunella
Also, I mix up very large batches of dough and create slice-and-bake logs of it, which I wrap in waxed paper or plastic wrap. If using waxed paper I put the rolls in a large ziploc bag. Sometimes I roll the entire log in chopped pecans or walnuts.
Then I refrigerate or freeze the logs before slicing to bake. The rolls need to thaw about 20 minutes before slicing. I love having several rolls stashed for munchy attack moments.

Slicing these logs and baking the slices results in chopped nuts around the peripheries of your cookies, if you'd rolled the logs in chopped nuts pre-freezing.
Watch out, because those nuts are vulnerable to burning. I find it's better to embed nut pieces directly in the dough. Nothing wrong with toasted chopped nuts, but they do better at lower temperatures than baked cookies do.


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BluesSinger
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 1:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
M

I agree, parchment paper seems to help.


Yes I used the parchment paper.    Still burned.

btw.. I got your private message Spring and replied but it wouldn't go through.  It says you are over quota!  
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Spring
Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 2:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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BluesSinger, what shelf are you cooking on? You aren't cooking them too close to the bottom, are you?  I'm always careful of that in my oven. I know it is no fun ruining expensive ingredients trying to fix a problem that doesn't make sense!  
If I could eat teff flour I would try your recipe and see what happens. I'm wondering if the syrup could be the problem. My mother used to make us syrup cookies sometimes and they were always cooked very gently.
Sorry I didn't get your PM!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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