Eat Right 4 Your Type®

Official Website Of Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo & The Blood Type Diet®


The D'Adamo Forums


The Forums, which have functioned in one way or another since 1996, have now been closed to new posting.
However there is a wealth of accumulated wisdom that can be searched for and utilized, so we've archived the messages.
Join our new forum on Facebook, the Eat Right 4 Your Type Group.


Main Forum Page  ♦   Search  ♦   Older Archives   ♦   Admins
BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Southern Italian Food
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 6 Guests

Southern Italian Food
  This thread currently has 5,183 views.
Print Print Thread
2 Pages « 1 2 All Recommend Thread
cajun
Friday, August 15, 2014, 4:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher/Explorer
Ee Dan
Posts: 3,155
Gender: Female
Location: Southern California
Age: 65
Thanks San j  

GCG,  I adore molasses and the sugarholic in me loves cookies, teacakes, fruit pies...


 Ao  ISFJ   Taster   Rh+  

"God gave us the gift of life. It is up to us to give ourselves the gift of living well." Voltaire
"Whisper words of wisdom. Let it be." Sir Paul McCartney
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 25 - 41
san j
Saturday, August 16, 2014, 1:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
My grandmother not only didn't use recipes, she never used a measuring device other than her hands or eyes.

I don't, either.
Don't underestimate how difficult Composing Recipes is for the likes of us (those of us who eyeball or go by consistency, etc.) I'm sure it's one of the main reasons we don't leave recipes behind.
Again, if you watch us do it, and listen to our spiel as we go, you'll learn all you need to know.

On YouTube, you can watch grandma-types cook their regional specialties and hear them tell you, in their native tongues without subtitles, what they're doing,
and you'll learn, without understanding the words, and without recipes.
It can be done.

Lesson: Videotape Grandma at work. Make her tell you what she's doing, but don't nag her to write it down.




D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 26 - 41
gulfcoastguy
Saturday, August 16, 2014, 2:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,536
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 57
Quoted from san j

I don't, either.
Don't underestimate how difficult Composing Recipes is for the likes of us (those of us who eyeball or go by consistency, etc.) I'm sure it's one of the main reasons we don't leave recipes behind.
Again, if you watch us do it, and listen to our spiel as we go, you'll learn all you need to know.

On YouTube, you can watch grandma-types cook their regional specialties and hear them tell you, in their native tongues without subtitles, what they're doing,
and you'll learn, without understanding the words, and without recipes.
It can be done.

Lesson: Videotape Grandma at work. Make her tell you what she's doing, but don't nag her to write it down.




She has been dead for 4 years, 2 weeks shy of 101. She was in excellent health up to the very end, black hair at 82. She just had a problem remembering the names of all 34 grandchildren the last few years much less the great grands and great great grands.. She only made orange coconut cake at Christmas and the aunts waited to late to learn the real recipe, she did NOT use orange cake mix. The molasses tea cakes and molasses cookie recipes they wrote down were very close and she taught all of the aunts to make chicken and dumplings correctly. The only southern food that she couldn't make well was corn bread. Completely opposite to her outstanding biscuits, her corn bread was best feed to the livestock. My other grandmother had a series of strokes when I was seven. The last thing that she made for me was a jar of pickles. Her cornbread was supposed to be outstanding though.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 27 - 41
san j
Saturday, August 16, 2014, 5:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Today at Whole Foods, it was like a food fair -- all the vendors at tables, sampling out.
There was this one representing salad dressings/marinades. She had four tiny cups, each containing a spinach leaf drenched in a different dressing flavor. She asked me which I liked best, as I admitted to being a salad dressing lover.
"The Lemon Garlic, without question," I said. "But it's too subtle for me. I like a more aggressive dressing. Nana used red wine vinegar and a heck of a lot more garlic. Like, In-Your-Face friggin' Garlic."
She laughed.
Yeah, like that.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 28 - 41
san j
Saturday, August 16, 2014, 10:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
S. Italian Recipe Hint: Just the right Italian or Italian/American crooning in the background as you work.  
YouTube is happy to oblige.
Also try iTunes World Radio for an Italian classics station...
Just might inspire you to throw in an extra clove of garlic or two,
or a pinch of basil or, yes, clove,
or grate your own breadcrumbs...
as you (of course) sing along.

This could also bring aunts, uncles, grandchildren and grandpa into the kitchen
to help!
to watch and learn!
to dance!


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 29 - 41
Averno
Sunday, August 17, 2014, 12:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,824
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland

Dino, Louis Prima and Claudio Villa work for me  

Anyone see Big Night?

http://youtu.be/HeXPJn8pYeM
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 30 - 41
san j
Sunday, August 17, 2014, 1:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Averno

Dino, Louis Prima and Claudio Villa work for me  

What are your food/music pairings?



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 31 - 41
Averno
Sunday, August 17, 2014, 12:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,824
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland

After seeing Big Night, we hosted a BN theme party, and I tried to replicate the timpáno recipe (it was a disaster). The food was amusingly ambitious, but kinda gross, so Louis Prima was the paired music.  
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 32 - 41
san j
Tuesday, August 19, 2014, 12:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Averno
After seeing Big Night, we hosted a BN theme party, and I tried to replicate the timpáno recipe (it was a disaster).


http://www.bonappetit.com/people/chefs/article/how-to-make-timpano-the-italian-grandmother-way

Just looking at this dish makes me crave green vegetables.
There were stages of its preparation, however, that said "Sunday Gravy" -
Chef's-Eye-Views that were like Déja-Vus to yours truly.

Pasta stuffed with pasta is kin'a out there for me.
Wouldn't order it.
I do like Meatballs served pasta-free, over such Italian vegetable standards as Rappini or Fennel, however. Pass the parmigiano!  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 33 - 41
Averno
Tuesday, August 19, 2014, 1:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,824
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
My grandmother not only didn't use recipes, she never used a measuring device other than her hands or eyes.

Quoted from san j
I don't, either.
Don't underestimate how difficult Composing Recipes is for the likes of us (those of us who eyeball or go by consistency, etc.) I'm sure it's one of the main reasons we don't leave recipes behind.
Again, if you watch us do it, and listen to our spiel as we go, you'll learn all you need to know.


Same here, unless I'm learning a new recipe or tweaking the errors out of someone elses. But after seeing Paula Wolfert's struggles, I decided to start writing everything down.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/health-july-dec13-wolfert_11-26/

Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 34 - 41
san j
Wednesday, August 27, 2014, 5:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
I had seen a YouTube in which a Neapolitan chef discussed using Ricotta in meatballs.
Anyone ever done that?

In a recent batch, I used some diluted heavy cream to soak bread crumbs (because I had no bread on hand to grate - I was using store-bought crumbs), and I have a feeling that this approximated the Ricotta Effect.
See? Every time you make a dish, there's a variation for some reason, "No Bread in the House" being a typical one.

Instead of a Meatball recipe, Nonna would have to write a Meatball Book, with chapters:

"The Time I Used Ricotta"
"The Time I Used Cream"
"How to Make Meatballs with and without Arthritis in Your Hands"
"Why I Prefer Parmigiana to Romano; Why Mamma Preferred Romano"
"Frying First vs. Baking First vs. Cooking Directly in the Sauce..."
"Using vs. Not Using Fresh Garlic"
"Spices and Herbs in Your Meatballs"
"Different Breads for Crumbs"
"Eggs"
"Water?"
"The Time Your Aunt Got The Idea to Fry Her Meatballs in Canola Oil"
"Which Meat(s)?"
"Which Pan(s)?"
"Size and Consistency: Preferences of 17 Family Members"
"Meatballs for the Whole Family vs. the Small Batches I Make 'Just For Papa'"
"Best Day of the Week for Making Meatballs"
"Making Meatballs in the Bronx vs. Making Them in Westchester"
"Meatballs in America versus Mamma's in Napoli"
"Music To Inspire Better Meatballs"
"Meatballs That Are Better on the Second Day"
...

Si, amici, these are the sorts of elements incorporated into those little sauced spheres atop one's spaghetti.
Particularly if Nonna made meatballs every week for decades, this is not a joke.
Add to that English-as-a-Second-Language, and the expectation of a written explanation from Nonna becomes even more unrealistic.

My best advice is that young people learn directly from the family elder who cooks.
That's how it has historically been passed along, and that's how it ever shall be...


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 35 - 41
md
Thursday, August 28, 2014, 1:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer
Ee Dan
Posts: 553
Gender: Female
Location: Cajun Country
I used ricotta in burgers but not meatballs.  There are 2 recipes in the recipe section that might interest you, but not meatballs.

Turkey Ricotta/Paneer Burgers with Carmelized Onions
Explorer Eggless Meatloaf

Remember to share, if you come up with a great recipe for meatballs.  


ISFP
Sirach 37:27
For not every food is good for everyone, nor is everything suited to every taste.



Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 36 - 41
san j
Thursday, August 28, 2014, 8:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from md
Remember to share, if you come up with a great recipe for meatballs.  

I have many great recipes for meatballs. And I add to the variations all the time!



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 37 - 41
jayneeo
Thursday, August 28, 2014, 8:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Gatherer
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 6,778
Gender: Female
Location: San Jose, CA
Age: 70
do u panfry them or bake or both?
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 38 - 41
san j
Thursday, September 17, 2015, 3:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from jayneeo
do u panfry them or bake or both?

Just found this thread, Jayneeo (because I started a thread today on braciole) so forgive late answer to your question.
I, personally? I tend to fry my meatballs in olive oil, giving them a sear.
After removing the meatballs to a platter, the meat drippings and bits are really important components of my sauce (You have the option of deglazing with wine or just letting the sauce absorb that delicious debris).
I later return the meatballs to the simmering sauce.
How about you?



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005

Revision History (1 edits)
san j  -  Friday, September 18, 2015, 7:26pm
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 39 - 41
san j
Thursday, September 17, 2015, 3:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Today I had a carb lunch - linguine w/olive oil, garlic and red pepper flakes, salt, lots of freshly ground pepper, fresh parsley and basil, and grated parmesan.
This is not the healthiest lunch for me - insufficient protein and greens - but it did the job and kept me going...
The bonus of the whole thing is how it makes the house smell.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 40 - 41
san j
Thursday, September 17, 2015, 8:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 6,331
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from md
Remember to share, if you come up with a great recipe for meatballs.  

One thing I've discovered is that I can tell by the feel, in my hand, of the raw meatball, if something "isn't quite right" -- I know if the weight is wrong, I know if the consistency is wrong as I roll it between my palms. That "feel", combined with its appearance, tells me what's needed.
I have literally stopped just in time, about to drop meatball #1 into the pan when I sensed a problem and returned that meatball to the bowl, and re-rolled all the meatballs with whatever I needed to add.

I don't know what your beneficials and neutrals are, md, but, Just 4 U, if you tell me what your meats and cheeses and breads are, I might come up with that recipe you covet (or coveted last year!)  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 41 - 41
2 Pages « 1 2 All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Southern Italian Food

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread
 


Need Help?

Contact D'Adamo Personalized Nutrition customer service for support on where to begin.

customerservice@4yourtype.com

203.761.0042

Personalized Living

A Daily Webzine Celebrating The Wonder Of Individuality & The Blood Type Diet®

Archive | Signup | Blog

Become a Patient

Center of Excellence in Generative Medicine (COEGM) is Dr. D'Adamo's main clinical facility. To schedule an appointment please visit:
www.generativemedicine.org

The statements made on our websites have not been evaluated by the FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration).
Our products and services are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician.
Copyright © 2016-2017, Hoop-A-Joop, LLC, Inc. All Rights Reserved