Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Veggies - Then and Now
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 3 Guests

Veggies - Then and Now  This thread currently has 2,037 views. Print Print Thread
2 Pages 1 2 » All Recommend Thread
Joy
Saturday, July 21, 2012, 10:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
When I was growing up dinner usually consisted of - meat, potatos, and a vegetable
(protein, starch, and carbohydrates)  

It didn't seem like dinner without all three of these on the plate.  You can substitute any protein, starch or carb that you were served.  The vegetables  for us were usually some variation of "Bird'sEye" because my mother had a part time job and didn't have time.  

The vegetables were usually reluctantly eaten because who wants to hear over and over again "Eat your vegetables!  They're good for you."  Since they were usually frozen they were placed in a pot of boiling water and cooked.  How many nutrients do you think were left in a portion?  My grandmother was taught to cook in Hungary at age 12.  Somehow she also used to save the water that certain vegetables were cooked in and drink it.  I'd say she was ahead of her time there.

I still  remember vividly being left at the dinner table to eat my wax beans.  I could not and did not and to this day am very glad.  Lima beans are in the same category for me.

Now it is a big surprise to me to find myself eating mostly vegetables and fruits.  I'm still not 100% and probably will never be but who knows.  

Another thing I'm quite amazed at is that a plate of vegetables or a few different vegetables cooked for a meal fills me up.  I didn't know I could get full on vegetables.  I thought they were necessary but didn't have calories because they were "yucky".

Do you have memories of dinner time and which vegetables you ate and why?

If you have kids now how do they do with vegetables?  Even though we have all this knowledge nowadays doesn't mean that kids will cooperate.  Kids are picky eaters that much I know.

I'm still discovering new vegetables and how to prepare them.

Joy

Revision History (1 edits)
Joy  -  Sunday, July 22, 2012, 2:03am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message
Goldie
Saturday, July 21, 2012, 10:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

All Gatherer -70 Scorp/Sag on BTD/GENO 17 year
Sam Dan
Posts: 5,914
Gender: Female
Location: East Coast
The wonders of the day we discover BTD and the do's and don'ts.. so much fun.. for me it was meat - for a while I ate as much as I could- suddenly loved it.. I had found certain spices and then can't get enough..

during my childhood I never had issues with food.. yet I had belly aches for 32 years until a good doctor told me about milk, which I never liked.. ha no wonder..    we never talked about food.. it was accepted as what it was .. I learned to cook early..  

I know a family that has a hard time eating green vegetables, one kid eat broccoli the other likes salad.. sorry to say they are all way over weight.. I wish ... but little by little I am convincing them not to eat white foods.. they are starting to listen.. a little.. well that is still progress..



Being here is invaluable, but not enough. We need ALL the Doctors. I needed them for a very small cancer spot-I could never feel!!! Please do your mammograms! Doing so saved me from cancer later on. I am grateful! Thanks for learning from my experience! I was lucky! I wish the same for YOU!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 38
Joy
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 1:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
That's what is so interesting about foods and how your eating habits change.

It's a worthy cause, Goldie, to help these people you introduced to the BTD.  

Like you said, "At least its progress".  

Hopefully they will recognize the benefits sooner rather than later.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 38
D.L.
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 8:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer Swami 44%, INTJ, Haplo Kla2a
Ee Dan
Posts: 567
Gender: Female
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
Age: 68
When I was growing up, our supper was always a meat, a starch, canned vegetables, (which I hated), dessert, and milk. Sometimes we also had a casserole. Once in a while fried fish and hush puppies or meatloaf (which I hated because it made me sick)). Lunch was usually a sandwich and cookies and milk. Breakfast was usually cereal and milk, or pancakes, bacon, and milk, or scrambled eggs and bacon, and milk. Didn't know then I was allergic to milk, eggs, and gluten. I hated vegetables. Ate a lot of oranges and grapefruit. Now I eat mostly vegetables ... not usually canned.  
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 38
Chloe
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 8:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,272
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
Interesting subject.  Our markets in Atlanta, Georgia when I was growing up had a very small section
of fresh produce.  Fruits were apples, pears, bananas and citrus fruits in winter....summer was melons, peaches, grapes and cherries.  There were farmer's markets we would go to but the variety wasn't all that different.  Vegetables were very limited...corn in summer, peas in their pods, string beans, carrots, iceberg lettuce, cucumbers, onions, radishes, celery, tomatoes but I never in my life saw or tasted broccoli or cauliflower until I was an adult. My mother bought a lot of frozen vegetables because we had a big freezer in the basement...Some canned vegetables like baked beans, creamed corn, peas, stringbeans (which didn't taste nor look like real stringbeans...a dirty dark green).  I do remember eating asparagus but it came out of a can.

My kids were born in the mid and late 60s...and therefore ate fresh vegetables because so much more was available in the supermarkets.  The sheer size of supermarkets vastly changed from when I was a child to when my children were born.

Now of course, it's a world of fruits and vegetables that literally takes up walls and tables in the
supermarkets where I go.  Mostly I shop in the health food store to buy organic. I will go to
farm stands just to buy local produce....even if it's not organic.

Growing up, I hated breakfast....There were mornings where all I would eat would be a graham
cracker and a glass of milk. Orange juice made me throw up...and even though my mother was
squeezing it fresh, I couldn't drink it.  I didn't like eggs and our cheese was Velveeta or swiss
cheese.  I would sometimes eat a piece of cheese, although mostly in the morning I had no appetite.

Lunch, I would normally bring a sandwich for lunch to school.  If anyone grew up when I did in the
deep south, the food on our cafeteria plates was a pile of slime.......overcooked black eyed
peas, collard greens which were faded from being so overcooked, greasy from pork fat and
repulsive to me.  So I would bring a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and I think I ate that every
day for ten years. (not a bad lunch for an A)

My mother would make us grilled cheese sandwiches sometimes on a Sunday night for dinner
to go with a big bowl of tomato soup which I thought was the BEST dinner on the planet....
She'd sometimes make us bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwiches...which I sort of liked but
could take or leave.  I honestly remember liking to eat liver...chicken liver or calves liver...
fried with onions. And lamb chops...We ate those at least once a week.  Probably we had beef
twice a week...steak or hamburgers...and fish sometimes but usually sole or flounder and
usually fried.

Dinner we always had baked potatoes, corn, rice or spaghetti as a starch, although I didn't want
anything with red sauce on it...so even spaghetti was eaten with just butter.  We'd have chicken,
fish, beef, and usually one vegetable....and always a salad first.....And dessert was usually something fruit-like from a jar or can...applesauce, fruit cocktail, canned peaches or pears...My mother made chocolate
pudding pretty often....I loved that.  Still do, won't eat it though. I have figured out a way to make it
with silken tofu....but it's not the same as the cooked chocolate pudding that had the "skin" on top.
Oh, and topped with whipped cream from a can...heaven!

When I came home from school, I'd have a glass of milk and cookies. I drank milk with every meal
and never drank soda except on Saturdays for lunch when my mother would go to the kosher deli
and get corned beef, rye bread, potato salad and cole slaw. Then I could have soda.

I rarely ate eggs because I hated them...hardly ever had sweets at home except for a cookie after school... occasionally would have hot cocoa....and ice cream sometimes in the summer. I wasn't much of an eater....But I did love one candy...cinnamon red hots...I could eat bags and bags of them.  It's a wonder I have any teeth left.  

We always had a bowl of nuts in their shells sitting in our family room growing up....with a nut
cracker sticking out of the bowl...We were always eating nuts as a snack...and I do remember
loving to eat raw peas out of the pods....raw stringbeans and carrots...so perhaps I did eat more
fresh foods than I thought I might have.

And now....fruits, vegetables are my staples....they take up most of my plate and I eat more
fresh produce than other foods. What's vastly changed is that plant foods like beans and soy
products take priority over animal proteins in my diet...I don't drink milk, I generally don't eat eggs... I'm intolerant of gluten so I don't eat a lot of grains...


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 4 - 38
DoS
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 9:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

L (a-b+); Slight-Taster; INFJ; Warrior
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,962
Gender: Male
Location: Montana
Age: 28
My mother and I like very different vegetables... I was not into them as a child.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 5 - 38
san j
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 9:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,413
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
There are places in the world and country where people still like those old, dead vegetables.
I was going to be a dinner guest at the home of a newlywed friend on Lake Geneva (Switzerland); her husband was a Dutchman. I said I'd help with dinner, and my friend (knowing my cooking background) was thrilled.

When her husband came home, she told him I was making the greenbeans "à la française", which to her meant they'd be cooked al dente, in the "nouvelle" style. Her husband tasted my perfectly executed greenbeans and literally spat them out. Apparently I'd touched a nerve in this new marriage. He had her put them back in the pot and cook them till they were "properly done". She removed them, again, too early. When they were almost brown (I kid you not), he said they were fine.

A monstrous but true story.
Others are not as bad, but not everyone likes to taste the Real Thing.  

I suspect it has something to do with memory/nostalgia. If that's the way Mama made it (and my friend said her Dutch mother-in-law indeed cooked everything to death and beyond), then that may be the way they insist is best!  

Some people like soggy noodles. Some people like canned, mushy peas (think: Brits  ). Some people like pop tarts  . What are you gonna do?



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 38
Chloe
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 10:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,272
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
Quoted from san j


Some people like soggy noodles. Some people like canned, mushy peas (think: Brits  ). Some people like pop tarts  . What are you gonna do?



Ooh, canned mushy peas....My mother in law served those to my husband when he was a kid.
First time he saw me put fresh looking peas on his plate, he said "peas aren't supposed to
look like this".  Excuuuuuusse me, sir....I think they ARE~  



"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 38
grey rabbit
Sunday, July 22, 2012, 11:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,303
Gender: Female
Location: Seattle
Age: 58
My dad liked canned peas, I grew up hating peas! My mom canned them herself though so they were probably rather healthy.

When I was 6 we moved to Northern California. My mom was bored because dad didn't want her to work outside the home, and she subscribed to "Sunset" magazine. We had the most varied and interesting meals ever! We had 2.5 acres of land and every inch of it was garden, and it was underneath a plum orchard. I didn't like plums much . I think there was every kind of vegetable possible in that garden from Artichokes to Zucchini and everything in between.


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 8 - 38
Joy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 12:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Everyone has memories about the food they ate while growing up and encountering people who still insist on having certain foods cooked a certain way.

D.L. - we always had milk with lunch and dinner.  Milk was supposed to fortify us as kids and now of course I can't drink cow's milk at all.  

If vegetables weren't frozen they usually came in a can.  I hated canned green beans because they always tasted to watery.

Chloe - I grew up in the 50's and 60's in the northeast and yet alot of what you described at mealtime was what we ate.  Campbell's tomato soup and a grilled cheese sandwich was an excellent lunch.  We used to have this round metal container with a long metal handle that you held over a gas flame with cheese in it (the crusts of the cheese were cut to fit into the metal dome.  You would flip it over periodically and then check to see if the cheese melted.  I think they might still sell them for camping.  It made the best grilled cheese with a l/8" cheesy crust.  

We got alot of our sandwich meats at a deli and they made great potato salad.  But we ate our fair share of Velveeta cheese.  When I think about that cheese now if you cut a thick slice it reminds me of orange polymer clay that is used for craft projects.  

Forgot to mention dessert which was the highlight of the dinner.  Chocolate pudding (Royale) was the best.  Whip cream made it yummy.  My mother sometimes served jello with Del Monte fruit jelled in it(peach slices, pineapple, cherries)  I abhorred it because it looked like the fruit was suspended in the jello and it was inedible to me.

I'd say that plenty of kids then and now could sustain themselves on peanut butter and jelly.  It really is a staple in my opinion.

DoS - I'm sure each family member has their own preference as far as vegetables are concerned.
Hating vegetables as a kid is quite typical.

Sanj - That experience with the greenbeans is something else.  There you are cooking and serving the freshest vegetable and it was only edible to your friend's husband when it became unrecognizable.  Sometimes whatever kids ate growing up no matter how it was cooked is the way they prefer it.  

GR - I'd say your family had the closest food to what we know as organic when you were growing up because the nutrients were still in the soil. It was that way all over the country.   Now the soil is quite depleted.   That's great that your mother was so creative with meals.  


Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 38
Chloe
Monday, July 23, 2012, 12:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,272
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
And Jello...I can't tell you how many bowls of Jello I ate.  About the same food value as soda....although
today HFCS has replaced all sugary foods.  Nobody I knew was really fat or overweight.  Kids were average
sized, even though we ate a lot of not so great foods compared to now.

Because we were Southerners, my mother made a lot of jello molds....with canned fruit salad...(but
truthfully, I wasn't a born southerner...I was born in NY, grew up in Atlanta from the time I was 7 till
we moved back to NY when I was 21)....But the foods of the south weren't appealing to me.  Except for
fried chicken...  Grits, ick.

Joy, remember when TV dinners came out?  Forgot about eating those. Chicken pot pie....now that was one of my favorite meals...

I can't remember my mother being a very creative cook.  My grandmother on the other hand was
awesome...When she and my grandfather came down south to visit us, my grandmother would be in
the kitchen for days, cooking for our freezer...But then we had old world European Jewish foods...
stuffed cabbage, brisket, stuffed veal with potato kugel, lots of chicken soup, potato pancakes...
and my grandmother only used fresh vegetables.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 38
Joy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 2:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
I lived in Manhattan for many years.  Love the restaurants and the energy but not the "hubbub" anymore.  I used to shop on the lower east side sometimes and they had the best boutiques and discounted highend clothing.  Sometimes my friends and I ate in a kosher deli and the one time we did I kept saying you could "eat off the floor".  It was that clean.  

There were great delis around and most people ordered corn beef sandwiches.  I always ordered brisket which I loved.  The sandwiches were piled high with meat but the rye bread was not so big.

Of course I remember TV dinners.  Swanson may have been the first.  It was the turkey dinner.
The meat "looked real" and then mashed potatoes, a little stuffing, and apple slices with cinnamon for dessert.  It was special when we had them but thankfully not that often.

Chicken pot pie was a treat.  God only knows what was in that gravy but the crust wasn't bad (not too doughy) and I could really taste the peas and carrots and there were real chunks of chicken in it.

My grandmother was an excellent cook also.  I think one reason my father married my mother was because he loved my grandmother's diamond cake. lol.   She was Hungarian.

Your grandmother could be immortalized because of her style of cooking.  Imagine using only fresh
vegetables at that time.  There was love that went into those recipes I'm sure.

My grandmother's rolling pin was passed on to me.  It is 20" long with tapered ends and is about 1 1/2" around.  I don't know the type of wood but there isn't a crack or pit anywhere on it.  It made alot of pastries in its time.  I cherish it.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 38
gulfcoastguy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 2:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,443
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
Both my parents grew up on farms about 5 miles apart. We allways had a large garden and we allways bought grassfed beef from my uncle. Not everything was perfect, Mom cooked beef to death and boiled all vegetables. There were all sorts of avoids also. I introduced a lot of new vegetables like zuchinni and showed her how to sautee it in olive oil and onion. The level of cooking has greatly improved. We allmost never had vegetables from a can at least.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 38
san j
Monday, July 23, 2012, 2:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,413
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
We had fresh salad with dinner every single night.
When I was a child I didn't care for tomatoes   , but there was lettuce, red onion, celery, carrots, green pepper, something like that. That was how - even if we had a frozen veg. on the main plate - we were assured of the fresh stuff every night. I was a major salad lover, too.

Oh, and we frequently had fresh homemade cole slaw, too.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004

Revision History (1 edits)
san j  -  Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:06am
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 38
Joy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
GCG,

Grassfed beef at that time?  That is a big plus for your family.  It's great you have a chance to introduce the family to some newer vegetables like zucchini.  And olive oil adds flavor to a variety of vegetables.  I use it all the time.  My father's mother boiled carrots until they were like hockey pucks.
He said they had no flavor whatsoever.

Sanj,

Fresh salad every night!  That goes a long way when a kid is growing up.  There was only one type of lettuce we knew about and that was "iceberg lettuce"  The most non-nutritious lettuce in the world.  It was mostly water so at least we were getting hydrated a bit.

Joy
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 14 - 38
san j
Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,413
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Joy

Sanj,

Fresh salad every night!  That goes a long way when a kid is growing up.  There was only one type of lettuce we knew about and that was "iceberg lettuce"  The most non-nutritious lettuce in the world.  It was mostly water so at least we were getting hydrated a bit.

Joy


I got a bee in my bonnet at one point about chicory (curly endive). It was the base lettuce in a salad at a restaurant we went to one night (I did grow up in New York, after all  ), and from then on it was a staple in my bowl.

How "Into Salad" was I? I used to have my grandmother ship her homemade vinaigrette to me at summer camp. It was olive oil based, and just loaded with raw garlic...
(The other children, for their ONE Allowed Food From Home, brought Nestle's Quik or Bosco, and there I was with my Nana's cruet of garlic vinaigrette.)



D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 15 - 38
gulfcoastguy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,443
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
Now mom could do salads  so I guess not all vegetables were boiled todeath. And she could fry sweet potato chips, make jelly and preserves, ferment pickles. Could probably have smoked a pig if we had one.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 16 - 38
gulfcoastguy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,443
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
Quoted from Joy
GCG,

Grassfed beef at that time?  That is a big plus for your family.  It's great you have a chance to introduce the family to some newer vegetables like zucchini.  And olive oil adds flavor to a variety of vegetables.  I use it all the time.  My father's mother boiled carrots until they were like hockey pucks.
He said they had no flavor whatsoever.

Sanj,

Fresh salad every night!  That goes a long way when a kid is growing up.  There was only one type of lettuce we knew about and that was "iceberg lettuce"  The most non-nutritious lettuce in the world.  It was mostly water so at least we were getting hydrated a bit.

Joy


Grassfed beef steak put in a pan in the oven and cooked till it was gray all the way through.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 17 - 38
san j
Monday, July 23, 2012, 3:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,413
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from gulfcoastguy


Grassfed beef steak put in a pan in the oven and cooked till it was gray all the way through.





Oh, dear. What a waste! To think: Animals giving their lives for that.
Okay, but you made it to adulthood with some red, I mean, gray meat in your tumtum.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 18 - 38
san j
Monday, July 23, 2012, 6:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,413
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Now look what you made me do: Late night salad vinaigrette!   (in honor of Nana)  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 19 - 38
D.L.
Monday, July 23, 2012, 2:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer Swami 44%, INTJ, Haplo Kla2a
Ee Dan
Posts: 567
Gender: Female
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
Age: 68
I had forgotten about the grilled cheese sandwiches and Campbell's tomato soup as a kid. Yum. But all avoids for me ... bread, cheese, tomato. I learned to cook when I was ten, using foods that my mom and dad grew up eating... lots of meat, starch, bread products, and sweets, since my dad is Swedish and German. We did eat squishy green peas, corn, and carrots from a can. And Oranges and grapefruit from the back yard. I ate ice cream or sandwiches instead of the horrible school lunches. I still remember the smell of heated spinach from a can that drifted from the school lunchroom to all the class rooms. Ick! Sickening!
When I went to college, I ate mostly chili or grilled cheese sandwiches (with a pickle) in the college cafeteria because it was cheap. And lots of cola drinks. When I got married I had to learn to cook all over again, using things my husband grew up eating in Mississippi. There were vegetables I didn't even know existed, like fresh field peas, okra, turnip greens. But still it was common to load everything up with salt, bacon grease, and sugar, which I didn't do. When my children were born and had so many food allergies, I had to learn to cook all over again. No gluten, eggs, dairy, corn. That was hard. And they didn't like vegetables. I used a lot of goat milk and rice, meats and fruits. When they left the nest, I cooked and ate whatever I wanted... mostly food on the run, because of work and more college. I knew I was allergic to dairy, gluten and eggs, but ate them anyway, because it was quick and easy, and suffered the consequences. After I got ulcers, I had to learn to cook and eat in a different way. When I went back to college for my master's, I ate junk on the run because of financial and time constraints.  When I started back to work I ate mostly junk... on the run.  After my sudden heart disease revelation 1 1/2 years ago,I had to learn to cook all over again, using compliant foods ... mostly vegetables ... which I never used to eat much of. This new way of eating is hard on my husband because he doesn't particularly want to eat what I can have. He is a meat and potatoes and milk kind of guy. I know I inherited a lot of allergies and heart problems, BUT if I had known back then what I know now, thanks to Dr. D and all the tests I've had, I would be a lot healthier now, I'm sure.  It's still hard for me to take it easy, but at least I'm eating my vegetables, hehe.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 20 - 38
Joy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 5:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,328
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
That's the issue in a way.  Foods we grew up with (and for alot of us there were many avoids) still feel like comfort food.  

D.L .-  Look how you rallied and learned to "cook all over again".  Thanks to Dr. D there is the BTD.  If I continued to eat beef I would probably be having more health issues.  But I sure loved a great cheeseburger with fries.

GCG - Back then there were a few staples (all avoids now) like ketchup, loads of salt, steak sauce, etc. that covered a multitude of foods to make them more edible.  But grassfed was much healthier for you even though it didn't look it.  And your mom did make homemade food.

Sanj - I didn't know chicory was curly endive.  I'm still learning about vegetables all the time.
I'll bet your grandmother's vinaigrette (loaded with garlic) kept you healthier than you realized because all these years later we know the benefits of garlic.

Joy

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 21 - 38
ruthiegirl
Monday, July 23, 2012, 5:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,295
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 42
My kids don't feel like a meal is complete without veggies, an they get frustrated at camp because of the limited options and the emphasis on starchy foods. I do try to mix it up and prepare veggies my kids will enjoy. My 17yo pretty much eats the same way I do. My 16yo feels like a meal isn't complete without sweet potatoes (and I haven't had any since she left for camp!) She's much more picky about the texture of the veggies she eats- if the broccoli is under or over cooked, she won't eat it. But she will eat veggie soups, so I generally make one daily so she gets a more balanced diet (I haven't made any veggie soups since she's been in camp either.)

My son is by far the pickiest eater of the three. It's not just because of his age- all of my kids were picky as preschoolers, but by age 10 my daughters were eating like adults. He likes cucumbers, baby carrots (raw) and canned green beans. Getting him to eat leafy greens is extremely difficult, but he will eat kale chips and romaine lettuce (as finger food, no dressing.)


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 22 - 38
D.L.
Monday, July 23, 2012, 6:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer Swami 44%, INTJ, Haplo Kla2a
Ee Dan
Posts: 567
Gender: Female
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
Age: 68
Oh, I left out one (brief) time slot, (another senior moment) which I was reminded of after the post about food combining. After I got ulcers and had to change my way of eating, I started on the FIT FOR LIFE eating plan by Harvey Diamond. It didn't help my ulcer pain, (Zantac and Mylanta eventually did) but I did lose weight and became the healthiest I had been for years. I ate lots of fruit and vegies, especially salads, although I did not completely give up gluten,(bad girl) having one slice of whole wheat bread a day. Then, unfortunately, my fast-paced life got in the way of proper eating again. Oh, dear. O.K., enough about me here. I'm headed down the right road now!!!!!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 23 - 38
gulfcoastguy
Monday, July 23, 2012, 7:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,443
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
Quoted from ruthiegirl
My kids don't feel like a meal is complete without veggies, an they get frustrated at camp because of the limited options and the emphasis on starchy foods. I do try to mix it up and prepare veggies my kids will enjoy. My 17yo pretty much eats the same way I do. My 16yo feels like a meal isn't complete without sweet potatoes (and I haven't had any since she left for camp!) She's much more picky about the texture of the veggies she eats- if the broccoli is under or over cooked, she won't eat it. But she will eat veggie soups, so I generally make one daily so she gets a more balanced diet (I haven't made any veggie soups since she's been in camp either.)

My son is by far the pickiest eater of the three. It's not just because of his age- all of my kids were picky as preschoolers, but by age 10 my daughters were eating like adults. He likes cucumbers, baby carrots (raw) and canned green beans. Getting him to eat leafy greens is extremely difficult, but he will eat kale chips and romaine lettuce (as finger food, no dressing.)


Look up the turkey meatloaf recipe on recipebase. It it's full of carrots, apple, spinach, and onion.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 24 - 38
2 Pages 1 2 » All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Veggies - Then and Now

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread