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Essential Ingredient: Love  This thread currently has 813 views. Print Print Thread
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san j
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 7:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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For the first time, I watched an episode of Iron Chef America.
It's a contest, pitting a "challenger"-chef against one of the ICA chefs in "Kitchen Stadium".
An ingredient is revealed as the contest's "Secret Ingredient", and the chefs are given an hour to create 5 dishes each, using the Ingredient.

Roving cameramen and reporters cover the match at a frantic pace. The reporters play-by-play like sports announcers:
"What's he adding there?"
"I don't know, Jeff - Looks like cream. I'd say he's gonna go for a velouté -"
[cut to other chef's counter]
"Symon's ACTUALLY gonna deep fry, here. And he's using Panko with a sprinkle of that reggiano he was grating earlier--"

It's anything but a relaxing show.

I was hoping that, at least, the judges would express some Soul, but it wasn't to be.

What a shame none of the Love came across that, for me and for the really great cooks I've known, is essential to the enjoyment of cooking and even of eating very special food.  

- - -

I had seen the very beginning of ICA before and couldn't watch. The Master of Ceremonies shtick is just too much. The Secret Ingredient's being displayed on "the Altar" is a real turn-off for me.
Now that I've actually watched a full episode, I'd say that the breakneck pace diminishes whatever instruction MIGHT have been otherwise possible. Allowing the chefs to voice-over their decision-making processes: THAT would have been cool: How do great chefs think on their feet?

Oh, well.
Ten unusual things to do with cauliflower -- that was nice. I really like cauliflower, and they used 4 varieties.

This morning I made braised cauliflower for breakfast. It was my first cauliflower since watching that program, and it was positively redolent with Love.
Thank you, Father.  


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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 7:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I thought you were going to say that they did an episode where the  "special ingredient in every dish" was love. In the context of a show like this, I think that would be cheating.

In real life, I  think love is one of the most important "ingredients" used- the energy used in making the dish does carry over into the finished product. I remember other Jewish people talking about certain foods "Tasting like Shabbos." The same foods made other times of the week wouldn't have been as special, and any food made for the Shabbos table somehow seemed more special as a result. Cooking foods earlier in the week to freeze and then serve on Shabbos made the kitchen "smell like Shabbos" even if it was Tuesday.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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san j
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 7:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
I thought you were going to say that they did an episode where the  "special ingredient in every dish" was love.






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Spring
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 8:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Actually, what we use to make those dishes did have the essential ingredient of love from the very beginning! In spite of the changes through thousands of years, there is still enough of it there to nourish us today - if we are careful of our choices, and how we handle it in our kitchens! My oldest sister used to describe the way our mother cared for the vegetables she cooked as "petting them!" TLC abounded in her kitchen!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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san j
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 8:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You heard it here, folks: Love is the Ultimate (and Universal) Beneficial.  


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Spring
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 11:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
You heard it here, folks: Love is the Ultimate (and Universal) Beneficial.  


I second that, wholeheartedly!! A real Diamond!!!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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grey rabbit
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 11:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring


I second that, wholeheartedly!! A real Diamond!!!




“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Seraffa
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 2:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
For the first time, I watched an episode of Iron Chef America.
It's a contest, pitting a "challenger"-chef against one of the ICA chefs in "Kitchen Stadium".
An ingredient is revealed as the contest's "Secret Ingredient", and the chefs are given an hour to create 5 dishes each, using the Ingredient.

Roving cameramen and reporters cover the match at a frantic pace. The reporters play-by-play like sports announcers:
"What's he adding there?"
"I don't know, Jeff - Looks like cream. I'd say he's gonna go for a velouté -"
[cut to other chef's counter]
"Symon's ACTUALLY gonna deep fry, here. And he's using Panko with a sprinkle of that reggiano he was grating earlier--"

It's anything but a relaxing show.

I was hoping that, at least, the judges would express some Soul, but it wasn't to be.

What a shame none of the Love came across that, for me and for the really great cooks I've known, is essential to the enjoyment of cooking and even of eating very special food.  

- - -

I had seen the very beginning of ICA before and couldn't watch. The Master of Ceremonies shtick is just too much. The Secret Ingredient's being displayed on "the Altar" is a real turn-off for me.
Now that I've actually watched a full episode, I'd say that the breakneck pace diminishes whatever instruction MIGHT have been otherwise possible. Allowing the chefs to voice-over their decision-making processes: THAT would have been cool: How do great chefs think on their feet?

Oh, well.
Ten unusual things to do with cauliflower -- that was nice. I really like cauliflower, and they used 4 varieties.

This morning I made braised cauliflower for breakfast. It was my first cauliflower since watching that program, and it was positively redolent with Love.
Thank you, Father.  


I think we all know, deep down, that famous chefs of old never had to do "extra competition" with other people in order to be well known. Half of it all was individuality and yes LOVE for their tradition and being able to spread it to people. Not "this is the quickest way for me to make a buck and be famous all at the same time." (puke)


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san j
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 2:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I do learn something from some of these cooking competitions, however.
They can provide unique opportunities to get inside the heads of other cooks and discover their thought-processes in situ. Their experience leads them to decisions I would not have made, when perhaps I should have! I like that. It can be fun.

I think the cauliflower episode was particularly frantic, too, because the challenger did something very unusual: He arrived with no sous-chefs. He refused assistance. So the Iron Chef decided to match him evenly by dismissing his own sous-chefs. It was wild.

But it pre-empted Love, which for me was ruinous.


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Dianne
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 11:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Interesting post. I think the mood of the cook comes through into the food. My friend and I were discussing this yesterday and she commented that in monasteries they would choose the the monk that was considered the holiest as the cook so good energy was transmitted into the food.  

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ruthiegirl
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 2:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cooking shows can be fun to watch. Sometimes they'll show techniques or ingredient combinations I wouldn't have thought of myself, and then I can adapt the recipes for my own family. But I've never watched any of those "cooking competitions", just the ones where the chef has half an hour to prepare food for a  fictional garden party, or one recipe is shown on a morning talk show. Low key, relaxed, scripted ahead of time, and fun to watch.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Sahara
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 2:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I love my food that is for sure, especially my salads.
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Lin
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 8:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I've read that when we prepare food and have good feelings for those who will eat it that it affects the food, as having negative feelings towards the diner can also affect the food.  It's a nice thought when you consider yourself lovingly cooking.  Just have to be careful whose food you eat!


Gluten/Casein and Yeast sensitivity.
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Spring
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 10:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lin
I've read that when we prepare food and have good feelings for those who will eat it that it affects the food, as having negative feelings towards the diner can also affect the food.  It's a nice thought when you consider yourself lovingly cooking.  Just have to be careful whose food you eat!

Maybe that is why some restaurants leave us feeling sort of blah!  


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Lin
Thursday, May 24, 2012, 11:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hmm interesting point you make Spring.


Gluten/Casein and Yeast sensitivity.
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san j
Friday, May 25, 2012, 1:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
just the ones where the chef has half an hour to prepare food for a  fictional garden party


I've only seen the cooks serving real people. I appreciate the codas of such shows, when the husband or sister or friends or colleagues taste the "outcome" - the satisfying ending to a story, for the viewer.

Are there shows featuring fake ones? How does that work?




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Kibble
Friday, May 25, 2012, 2:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I used to love food but it hurt me, I have trust issues.
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