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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  vegetables unexplored territory to me
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vegetables unexplored territory to me  This thread currently has 683 views. Print Print Thread
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Rachel D
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 8:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm looking over my beneficials. I need to incorporate more veggies into my diet. A lot more. I've been eating better in general but not getting enough of those and going a little heavy on the meat. Anyway, I'm wondering how other type O's choose to get their veggies in. I've noticed that most of my beneficials are lettuce types. Do you all make a habit of eating salads daily? I'm not really big on them but I'm not resistant to adding them. I also have strange things like rutabagas. Are a lot of these similar to cooking potatoes? Are these root vegetables? I can post my list for more detail if needed. I'm still trying to learn to cook more so any advice is appreciated.


Very likely allergic to dairy, gluten makes me moody, caffeine makes my heart race, fragrances give me hives and headaches..I shouldve known I'm an Explorer. Swami knows best.
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ABJoe
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 8:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Post it / them...  We don't know where we can help if you don't ask question...!

Quoted from Rachel D
I also have strange things like rutabagas. Are a lot of these similar to cooking potatoes? Are these root vegetables?

Rutabagas are root vegetables.  Here is the Typebase page to read the description:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?355
You can cook them like (mashed) potatoes.  You can also roast them, either by themselves or in combination with other vegetables...


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Rachel D
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 9:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ok I will. Here are all my beneficials.

Artichoke ◊
Asparagus
Broccoli
Broccoli Raab, Rapini
Broccoli, Chinese
Chicory ◊
Chinese Kale, Kai-lan
Dandelion Greens ◊
Escarole ◊
Fenugreek ◊
Ginger ◊
Horseradish
Jerusalem Artichoke ◊
Kale ◊
Kohlrabi
Lettuce, Romaine
Mushrooms, Enoki
Okra ◊
Onion, all types ◊
Peppers, Chili, Jalapeno ◊
Pumpkin ◊
Rutabaga ◊
Sea Vegetables, Kelp, Kombu, Nori, Bladderwrack ◊
Sea Vegetables, Spirulina ◊
Sea Vegetables, Wakame ◊
Swiss Chard ◊
Turnip Greens ◊
Turnips ◊


Very likely allergic to dairy, gluten makes me moody, caffeine makes my heart race, fragrances give me hives and headaches..I shouldve known I'm an Explorer. Swami knows best.
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koahiatamadl
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 9:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You can cook most of them  

My Chinese room mates at university even cooked lettuce...

If you struggle and want an easy way to add vegetables to your diet vegetable soups are a good way to start.  Stir fries also go a long way.  Another easy option is to do a tray of roast vegetables that you can add to your meals during the week.    
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ABJoe
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 9:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Rachel D
Ok I will. Here are all my beneficials.

Obviously, you can look these up in Typebase or Wikipedia to get information about what they are and how to recognize them at the store...  Recipes abound on the internet for many of these foods as well, so information is pretty easy to find...

Classify rutabaga, turnip and Jerusalem artichoke together as essentially interchangeable for cooking and use...  JA and turnip can be eaten raw, don't know about rutabaga...

Ginger and horseradish are essentially spices, although I eat a leaf or so from growing horseradish fresh as a live food, it is usually ground root prepared as a condiment...

Greens - generally cooked - Artichoke, asparagus, chard, dandelion, kale, okra, turnip greens...

Raw or cooked - Broccoli, onion...

I don't know enough about the rest to help...





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Rachel D
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 9:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
If you struggle and want an easy way to add vegetables to your diet vegetable soups are a good way to start.  Stir fries also go a long way.  Another easy option is to do a tray of roast vegetables that you can add to your meals during the week.    


Great ideas, thank you!

Quoted Text
Classify rutabaga, turnip and Jerusalem artichoke together as essentially interchangeable for cooking and use...  JA and turnip can be eaten raw, don't know about rutabaga...

Ginger and horseradish are essentially spices, although I eat a leaf or so from growing horseradish fresh as a live food, it is usually ground root prepared as a condiment...

Greens - generally cooked - Artichoke, asparagus, chard, dandelion, kale, okra, turnip greens...

Raw or cooked - Broccoli, onion..


This is the infomation I was looking for, thanks, I'll look into it more.


Very likely allergic to dairy, gluten makes me moody, caffeine makes my heart race, fragrances give me hives and headaches..I shouldve known I'm an Explorer. Swami knows best.
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D.L.
Sunday, April 29, 2012, 10:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Asparagus is good roasted with a little olive oil. Broccoli is good steamed. So are turnips if you slice them. Broccoli stems are good peeled, sliced thin, and put in salads. Mushrooms are good sliced and stir-fried in olive oil. Romaine lettuce is excellent in salads, even mixed with other lettuces and spinach and acceptable fruit. I like okra sliced and either steamed or roasted in olive oil. Onions are good in soups, steamed, and stir-fried. Turnip greens are good boiled but if you get old ones, they are tough and bitter. Buy baby or young ones only because they are tender and good. I buy pumpkin by the can, put a little clarified butter in a frying pan, add a little agave or honey, and cinnamon, (if compliant for you). Yummy. I don't know about the other stuff on your list. I wasn't much of a vegetable eater before.
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veggiequeen
Monday, April 30, 2012, 2:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Rutabaga are sometime called 'yellow turnip' but are not as watery as turnips.

Peel the rutabaga like a potato and slice or cut into cubes or quarters depending on the size. Simmer in an inch of sea salted water stirring occasionally to cook evenly. Cook until tender when poked with a fork and maybe try to boil the water off (I try to avoid draining veggies so the nutrients don't go down the drain). Throw a little ghee or grass-fed butter and dill or other compliant herb in toward the end. Better than potatoes for sure. I make them up a bunch at a time and eat them hot the first day, then make veggie 'salads' the next days mixing up whatever leftover veggies I have available and eating them cold or room temp. Leftover rutabaga are great for breakfast also.


"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is."
(American baseball player and manager Yogi Berra, or computer scientist Jan L. A. van de Snepscheut, or physicist Albert Einstein - depending on the source...)

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veggiequeen
Monday, April 30, 2012, 2:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Also... you might check out this website...

http://whfoods.org/recipestoc.php

There are lots of veggie recipes/cooking instructions there. I found it a long time ago when looking for ideas for cooking greens.

The recipes say to generally cook the veggies in water or broth and add fats before serving in order to maintain the integrity of the fats. There are also a lot of veggie/herb combinations and instructions on cutting up different types of vegetables. I haven't looked at every corner of the website so can't say if there is any 'bad' advice, but I've found good info there in general.


"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is."
(American baseball player and manager Yogi Berra, or computer scientist Jan L. A. van de Snepscheut, or physicist Albert Einstein - depending on the source...)

Finally doing "the work"!  
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Victoria
Monday, April 30, 2012, 5:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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A delicious way to prepare kale:

I like lacinato kale -

First rinse the greens, shake or blot dry and cut out the large part of the stem.  Slice or tear into small pieces.  Set aside.

Heat a little compliant oil or some ghee in a heavy bottomed pot or skillet on low/med.  When hot, but not hot enough to smoke, add a few cloves of peeled garlic that have been cut in half. Stir the garlic until it releases its' aroma, then -

Stir in the kale, sprinkle with a little salt and stir constantly until the leaves wilt.  Add a few Tb of water and put on a lid.  Let cook on low for a few minutes, stirring occasionally, adding a little water only if necessary.  I like to let most of the water evaporate off before serving.



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Kibble
Monday, April 30, 2012, 1:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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A lot of times I cook my meat and vegetables together all spiced up and put in on a bed of lettuce on my plate and just dig in.
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gulfcoastguy
Monday, April 30, 2012, 2:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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An excellent way of learning what to do with these vegetables is to search the recipebase.
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deblynn3
Monday, April 30, 2012, 4:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Rachel D
I'm looking over my beneficials. I need to incorporate more veggies into my diet. A lot more. I've been eating better in general but not getting enough of those and going a little heavy on the meat. Anyway, I'm wondering how other type O's choose to get their veggies in. I've noticed that most of my beneficials are lettuce types. Do you all make a habit of eating salads daily? I'm not really big on them but I'm not resistant to adding them. I also have strange things like rutabagas. Are a lot of these similar to cooking potatoes? Are these root vegetables? I can post my list for more detail if needed. I'm still trying to learn to cook more so any advice is appreciated.


Lloyd, just did a blog showing what looks like a pumpkin pie but is really a rutabaga pie,  I'm hoping it's in the recipe base.


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Wholefoodie
Monday, April 30, 2012, 4:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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A big romaine salad (with animal protein) every day for lunch covers a good portion of the veggies. The salad contains some combination of other veggies as well such red onion, and carrots, onions and celery (neutrals).

Dinnertime staples include steamed broccoli, roasted asparagus, sauteed swiss chard or kale. Almost always a sweet potato, either baked or sliced and roasted in the oven but I don't see that on your list so it is probably a neutral, but you could roast turnips.

Sometimes eggs and veggies in a nori sheet for breakfast.

I make a pot of meat soup often with loads of veggies as well.

Lisa


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Spring
Monday, April 30, 2012, 5:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just cooked some Swiss Chard, and it definitely cooks in a hurry! I just used olive oil, a sprinkling of turmeric and salt. Yummy! Next time I won't add any liquid at all because it wilts quickly even with the heat lower than normal and is done before there is any need for added liquid.



"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Cristina
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Find this Rutagaba Pie recipe with clear step by step photo instructions:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Rutabaga-Pi/




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Possum
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Quoted from veggiequeen
Rutabaga are sometime called 'yellow turnip' but are not as watery as turnips.
Does anyone know what the difference is between rutabagas & what we call swedes in the southern hemisphere? I thought they were the same, but the swedes here have white flesh...

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Cristina
Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 6:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Possum
Does anyone know what the difference is between rutabagas & what we call swedes in the southern hemisphere? I thought they were the same, but the swedes here have white flesh...



Our Sweedes here are yellow/creamy and purple on the outside and yeallow / creamy color flesh.  That is in Australia, the white fleshed and white skin are called turnips here ...

Edited to add: It is my understanding Sweedes and Rutagaba are one and the same ...




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Possum
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Quoted from Cristina


Our Sweedes here are yellow/creamy and purple on the outside and yeallow / creamy color flesh.  That is in Australia, the white fleshed and white skin are called turnips here ...

Edited to add: It is my understanding Sweedes and Rutagaba are one and the same ...
Cheers, C - that's what I always thought, but something on another thread a few days ago, gave me the impression I was mistaken

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Cristina
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Cristina
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... Now you can tell them ... 'Cristina told me so ' ....  




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Possum
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ruthiegirl
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Swedes, rutabegas, wax turnips, and waxed  turnips are all the same vegetable. The color on the outside is purple/white, and inside it can range from white to yellow.

Turnips are similar to the above, but smaller and more delicate. Turnips can be eaten raw or cooked, and cook up a bit faster than rutabegas do. Rutabegas can't be eaten raw.

I've found that rutabegas, sweet potatoes, winter squashes, or beets can be prepared pretty much the same way potatoes can be prepared, although the end result will taste different than potatoes. So if you've been cooking before, any of your old recipes will work with healthier substitutions.

Any root vegetable can be peeled, cut into 1 inch cubes, and roasted in the oven with olive oil, salt, and (optional) spices. You can serve roasted veggies "as is" or mash up into something like mashed potatoes, or you can take those roasted veggies, add water, and you've got the base for veggie soup. I even once used half-roasted sweet potatoes and put them in a frying pan with ground beef (details in the blog post titled "power out!").

Greens can be eaten raw in salads, steamed (something I haven't perfected the art of) or stir-fried/sauteed. Most mornings for breakfast, I sautee onion, garlic, and hot red pepper in ghee, then, when it's mostly cooked, I add some sliced greens (kale, spinach, dandelion greens, or beet greens) and let it cook another few minutes until the greens wilt (or thaw, if I'm using frozen spinach) then add eggs.

Cooked greens also work in stir fries. Bok choy is the green "designed" for stir fry use, but almost any green works in the same method. For stir fry, heat oil in a wok or big frying pan. First put in the veggies that take longest to cook (onions, carrots, plus spices like garlic and ginger, if using fresh) then add the raw meat, then add the bok choy, (add meat after the greens if it's leftover cooked meat), then add broccolli and liquid (broth, water and salt, any powdered or liquid seasonings such as garlic powder or tamari) cover and let steam until everything is hot. Serve over cooked rice or eat it as a grain-free meal.

The veggie soups I make for DD2 each day have roasted carrots and onions, plus sometimes roasted zuchinni or butternut squash or rutabega- whatever I have on hand. After roasting the veggies in olive oil and salt, I add water, spices, cooked beans, and frozen or fresh spinach, then let simmer 2 hours before serving. I make it in the morning and DD2 eats it after school. Some days I use broth instead of water and add leftover cooked meat to the soup as well.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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