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British Cuisine  This thread currently has 1,798 views. Print Print Thread
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san j
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
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Do you like it?
Have you any cool recipes for your type?
Have you adapted any traditional British dishes for BTD or GTD?


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Lola
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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is there such a thing????


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Spring
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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British cuisine has been described as "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it."
They love sauces, for sure. And custards.....boiled, that is. We had a friend from over there, and everyone was learning how to make that "perfect" boiled custard they loved so much! I decided I liked it pretty well myself! Now, Americans, in general, they just pile on ice cream!! Who wants boiled custard when you have ice cream!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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san j
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 3:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
British cuisine has been described as "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it."


It has also been characterized as majoring in "Comfort Food".
And, yes, the "quality local ingredients" are sources of very great pride there.

I daresay that the older we get, the less fancy/busy we generally like our dishes -- the more we demand or appreciate superb ingredients whose innate flavors really shine through. And this is where British cuisine is poised to excel: In simplicity. Insofar as the ingredients are the Very Best, it's a real winner.



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Possum
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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imo NZ cuisine is even better Great fresh ingredients, world renowned quality meats & no need to disguise anything really with sauces
Quoted from Spring
Now, Americans, in general, they just pile on ice cream!! Who wants boiled custard when you have ice cream!
lol my husband, when asked by my English mother whether he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding, cheekily said "all three thanks"
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gulfcoastguy
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It is a decent approach, to let quality ingredients stand on their own. I;m sure my Scottish ancestors ate something besides haggis.
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Spring
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Possum
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lol my husband, when asked by my English mother whether he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding, cheekily said "all three thanks"

Hilarious!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Possum
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm sure they ate oats gcg My 1st generation Dad (of Scots parents) used to live on oats if you let him...
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honeybee
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I follow @jamieoliver for great favorites & adaptations

archived here : http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/lamb-recipes
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Lola
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 6:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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my dad married a Brit.......

she must have been a lousy cook then!!!


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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 9:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Well I can say that British cousine has improved a lot the last years.

I looove Nigella
Jamie Oliver
and River cottages Hugh FW

I find it fairly easy to adapt their food.
I use spelt flour when they use wheat
I can have cream and butter so no faces for me  
The only hard thing to avoid is sugar and bacon  

I went to London last month
we had amazing good food ( sure it was a Weston A Price thing but still )
What I loved going out to eat was that most places used free range eggs.

I had lovely food at a Pub- yes it was not 100 % BTD
I had an amazing tender pork belly, with cidergravy, mashed potatoes with kale and baked pears- it was a amazing  

Another day at the same pub I had potatoes in garlic cream sauce with minted peas and lovey tender lamb.





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paul clucas
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 10:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Possum
I'm sure they ate oats gcg My 1st generation Dad (of Scots parents) used to live on oats if you let him...
Even if it was three days old and served cold.

Oats were a major part of my very successful weightloss health kick.  I have been thinking of recreating that way of eating, because I could "afford" two meals a week of anything and everthing I craved.

I would replace oats with Quinoa, however.



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Possum
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 10:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from paul clucas
Even if it was three days old and served cold.
Isn't that peas porridge in the pot 9 days old?
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shoulderblade
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Quoted from Possum
Isn't that peas porridge in the pot 9 days old?


That is correct. Paul seems to be talking fast food, Scots style, here.  






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deblynn3
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from gulfcoastguy
It is a decent approach, to let quality ingredients stand on their own. I;m sure my Scottish ancestors ate something besides haggis.


Roast Grouse, shortbread,scones,blackberry crumble, lemon sponge and lemon Curd

The crumble is easy to make BT friendly



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NewHampshireGirl
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm not certain I know what boiled custard is.
I do make my English grandmother's recipe for plum pudding and I haven't changed the ingredients one bit since we eat it only once a year.  I also make the sauce for it which is not hard sauce but pourable sweetened white sauce with nutmeg.........the best thing in this whole world!!
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Henriette Bsec
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Bouiled custard is a custard made wit eggyolks, sugar and cream


Lemon curd is amazing egg yolks, sugar, lemonjuice and butter - what not to like


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Spring
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[quote=1130]I'm not certain I know what boiled custard is. /quote]

It is very much like egg custard except it is liquid enough so you can pour it out of a pitcher. The trick is getting the "liquid" just right and not scorching it in the process - with NO lumps, of course! I really like it.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Spring
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Quoted Text
Lemon curd is amazing egg yolks, sugar, lemonjuice and butter - what not to like

It is delicious!!!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Lin
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 5:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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When I was growing up my mother made the best custard, and in the winter hot custard over apple pie was the best.  I don't think it is called boiled custard, but the milk is boiled to make the custard, and then some poor kid (me back then) stood stirring the custard so it would not get a skin on the top!
Possume,
I am married to a New Yorker, and he would probably respond like your husbandif asked did he wanted custard, cream or icecream on his Christmas pudding!  Us Brits tend to be too polite and miss out
Lin


Gluten/Casein and Yeast sensitivity.
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san j
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 6:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Henriette Bsec
Another day at the same pub I had potatoes in garlic cream sauce with minted peas and lovey tender lamb.


See? They know just what they're doing. Yum.
But, yes, their cuisine has definitely much improved over the decades.


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cajun
Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 9:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Possum, I agree with your DH! I want a little of everything, too!
Honeybee, love Jaime Oliver!
HB, my Mom makes the best lemon curd, I can't stand how long it takes..stirring forever..so I try to sneak a taste while she is at the stove..hot and yummy..oh my!

I've only been to London to fly in or out but did have a 3 day stay once in 2006.
In my opinion, hop over to Ireland for a good meal! I've had 2 long vacations there about 4 years apart, stayed in hotels and bed and breakfasts and one private home all over the country, and enjoyed every meal!   


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ABJoe
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Quoted from NewHampshireGirl
I do make my English grandmother's recipe for plum pudding and I haven't changed the ingredients one bit since we eat it only once a year.

I LOVE the flavor of grandma's plum pudding, but I can't eat enough of it to make it even once a year...

I did make a steamed lemon pudding from an International cookbook when in college that I really liked...  Hmmm...  I need to dig out that cookbook and see how to make it compliant for us.  It wasn't very sweet, so it shouldn't be a problem for my sweet sensitive Explorer...

My WW is English, but her family has been in the US since the Revolution, so most of their recipes have been "Americanized" through the years...


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Spring
Thursday, April 19, 2012, 1:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes, it is called boiled custard. Maybe there are other names for it too.

http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,boiled_custard,FF.html


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Brighid45
Thursday, April 19, 2012, 1:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Fantastic recipes here:

http://www.amazon.com/Ploughma.....334843575&sr=1-1

Not a clinker in the bunch. With a little tweaking, most of them can be made type-friendly.


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