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Thanksgiving Dinner Wine Pairings  This thread currently has 654 views. Print Print Thread
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san j
Sunday, November 20, 2011, 11:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
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Heard a segment of a radio show this morning re: Thanksgiving Dinner Wine Pairings.

Post your thoughts, intentions, questions here, and let's have a look, if you like. What to serve with your hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, main courses, desserts, etc.  


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san j  -  Monday, November 21, 2011, 2:37am
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Patty H
Monday, November 21, 2011, 12:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Since I am an O Hunter, red wine is the only wine/alcohol I can drink.  In my opinion, Pinot Noir would make a nice wine to serve with turkey, but I am not a wine expert.


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san j
Monday, November 21, 2011, 2:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
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Makes good sense. Turkey doesn't call for anything with a heavy tannic structure. Sometimes people have "challenging" side dishes at this holiday dinner and wonder which wines will permit mutual flattery...


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chrissyA
Monday, November 21, 2011, 4:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Pinot noir is the classic wine to pair with T'giving dinner, as is beaujolais  


SWAMI
“Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.” --Hippocrates (460-377 B.C.)
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san j
Monday, November 21, 2011, 5:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
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Quoted from chrissyA
Pinot noir is the classic wine to pair with T'giving dinner, as is beaujolais  
  

So they say.
Some do prefer otherwise, if only for variety's sake.
Very often people invite others to bring side dishes or appetizers which are different, and they wonder what to drink with these.
There's no telling taste.


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O in Virginia
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 2:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami
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Thanksgiving is sort of a free-for-all and anything goes, imo.  Drink what you like.  I wouldn't drink a very assertive wine at Thanksgiving, just something that goes well enough with everything because of the variety of foods.  But each to his or her own taste is my philosophy.  As an O, I can have red wine (whites no longer).  The wines from the Loire Valley are nice, Chinons and what have you.  They are not so huge and overpowering to a meal.  And there is a local Cabernet Franc that I like, but I can't remember now what the winery is.  Better get busy, I guess.  Thanksgiving is this week and I will be buying wine.

If you like whites there are some great Alsatian whites that I think go great with Thanksgiving.  Or rieslings from Germany.  I think it's great to break out and try wines that are new to you.  I hate the same-old same-old, but I just go with the flow and drink what I'm given.  If I'm buying, I buy what I like.    I need to get out there and try some new wines.  This is my reminder.
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jayneeo
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 2:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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dessert could be its own thing, no wine, then after, maybe port....

(oops...technically not btd approved, but...?)
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Paula 0+
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 4:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Champagne is a great "food" wine.  We are going to have a red blend from Bonny Doon called Cigare Volant with our grilled turkey, champagne probably before with maybe some cheese and fruit appetizer.  
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honeybee
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 7:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 312
Champagne is a great "food" wine.  We are going to have a red blend from Bonny Doon called Cigare Volant with our grilled turkey, champagne probably before with maybe some cheese and fruit appetizer.  




Poultry is traditionally paired with white wine isn't it? I so love the idea of a nice champagne with it too. Plum pudding with a shiraz. Brandy custard. Beer and cheddar. Seafood and chardonnay.
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san j
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 7:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from honeybee

Poultry is traditionally paired with white wine isn't it?


Nope. It totally depends what kind of poultry, which part of the bird, saucing and accoutrements...and then taste!



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honeybee
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 8:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j


Nope. It totally depends what kind of poultry, which part of the bird, saucing and accoutrements...and then taste!



Yeah a nice gravy made from the drippings helps things along  
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O in Virginia
Tuesday, November 22, 2011, 9:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami
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Quoted from san j


Nope. It totally depends what kind of poultry, which part of the bird, saucing and accoutrements...and then taste!



That's true.  We had a red wine with a white fish (lotte) in France.  The sauce was made from red wine.  I guess the main idea is, your wine should complement the flavors of the food, and not blast them to oblivion.  I agree that Champagne is good with almost anything.  I don't really like it, though.  I enjoy nice Champagne, but it gives me a horrible headache.  Not worth it for me.  
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san j
Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 1:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Not a big bubbly fan myself, but it has its place.

The biggest mistake I think many Americans make with wine, at the Thanksgiving table anyway, is going too tannic / woody / "oaky". This is why the reds to choose are those that are younger and fruitier and can take on the sweeter side dishes one tends to enjoy at this meal. The smoky flavors of many stuffings can pair well with a red such as a Pinot Noir or a Beaujolais Cru, a Côtes du Rhône or even a simple Spaniard such as Garnacha. I say Go for a "quaffer", so the food really shines on this day. Wine that is too structured may be too dry and puckery for the standard / traditional Thanksgiving dinner.

For those who do prefer whites, I step outside my comfort zone and say Try a pretty big Chardonnay, something not too pretentious. The Aussies have a few they outright tell you are "unoaked". I had a Chilean Chardonnay with a recent Thanksgiving dinner, and it was Perfect. Not that there aren't other white grapes to try, such as a Pinot Gris, a Viognier, or even a Chenin Blanc (the latter famous in the Loire as Vouvray, for instance). Don't go too expensive with this meal. Just be convivial and carefree, I say.

I have always liked Beaujolais Nouveau at Thanksgiving dinners. It is released three weeks into November every year. It's fun, not serious. It's pleasant and bows to just about everything on the table. It's inexpensive. It comes to you about 8 weeks after its grapes have been picked, so, if you make it an annual tradition, you learn about terroir and vintage (but that's another story). If you have no snobby reason to disdain B.N., you should like it. But don't lay it down; you must drink these bottlings by March - they don't keep.

Santé!  


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