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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Victoria! goat yogurt?
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Victoria! goat yogurt?  This thread currently has 1,347 views. Print Print Thread
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grey rabbit
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 1:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
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Victoria, would you please be so kind as to share your recipe for raw goatmilk yogurt? Do you heat the milk first? Any tips would be greatly appreciated, I'm picking up a gallon of raw milk tomorrow.


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Victoria
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 5:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Goat Yogurt!    Here's how I make it:

Fill a small *ice chest* with hot water to pre-heat.  I make 3 pints of yogurt at a time, so I use a 6-pack sized little cooler.  

~ Heat 5 C goat milk in a heavy-bottom pot until milk starts to "rise up".
~ Immediately remove from heat and set aside to cool.

~ After 10 minutes or so, pour into 3 very clean pint-sized jars.
~ Let the jars of milk cool until you can hold a jar against your cheek for 5 seconds without pain.  There are yogurt thermometers that tell you the temperature, but I don't use them.  I just imagine that I want the temperature to be comfortable to give to a small child to drink.  That's how I guesstimate it.  

~ Add 1 rounded Tb of live yogurt to each jar.  Alternatively, add a couple of Polyflora capsules to each jar and in the future, you can use your own yogurt as a starter.  Tighten cap and shake well.

~ Empty water from cooler and fill with fresh hot tap water.  Set the jars into water, leaving the lids sticking up out of the water.  Close the chest, set on a thick carpet or folded towel.  Cover and wrap with a thick towel and set out of the way in a place that is going to be comfortably warm.

~ I let it set for 10 hours.  Remove from the chest, rinse off jars in cool water, loosen lids a little bit and refrigerate.

If it doesn't thicken, it could be any number of things:
-- the jars might not be clean enough
-- the milk might have been too hot and therefore killed the culture
-- the milk might have bee too cold and the culture wasn't able to thrive
-- the culture might not have been viable.  Not all store yogurt contains strong microorganisms.  Some are cut with starch, such as tapioca and can interfere with the process.
-- if you try and make it without bringing the milk to a boil, sometimes non-harmful bacteria in the milk can overpower the yogurt culture, rendering it ineffective
-- if you disturb the jars during the incubation process, it may break up the curd before it sets up well
-- if the yogurt sets and then is left in the hot water bath too long, it can 'over-culture', turning sour and thin
-- if the hot water bath is not warm enough, the culture doesn't really reproduce well



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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honeybee
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 7:57am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Found a recipe online recently by someone who makes their yoghurt in the slow cooker / crock-pot.

Re-posted here for ref:

Heat 2 litres of unhomongenised organic milk (or any milk you like, including non-dairy milks) in the slow cooker for 2 1/2 hrs on low. Turn the heat off and let it sit for 3 hours.

Then take out a cup or two of milk and whisk together with 1/2C to a cup of whatever yoghurt you like (I used Jalna biodynamic the first time), which puts the bacteria into the milk.
Then add the yoghurt-infused milk back into the slowcooker, give the whole lot a stir to incorporate and then wrap the whole slowcooker up in a couple of beach towels and let it sit overnight (at least 8 hours) so the bacteria can multiply. When you unwrap it you’ll have yoghurt

Store it in the fridge and reserve 1/2C to make your next batch.

Note: It’s runnier than store bought yoghurt, but it’s perfect for smoothies. The longer it sits in the fridge, the thicker it gets. I’ve found that cows milk yoghurt thickens better than goats milk and I haven’t personally tried non-dairy milks but I know they can be used.

You will find that a liquid will accumulate on the top (it can have a yellowy colour), don’t discard this! It’s the whey and it is highly nutritious. Also, I’ve theoretically stuffed it up loads of times (eg. let it heat too long, let it heat then turned it off and forgotten about it completely till the next day and started the process all over again etc) and it still always works.
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grey rabbit
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 12:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
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I'm going to try Victoria's method as I don't have an insulated crock pot/slow cooker. I will report back! I'm always careful to read the ingredient list on my yogurt (and everything else I buy) so I will use that since I don't have any polyflora.Thanks!


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Victoria
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 2:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I'm curious about the crock pot method.  What is the reason for initially heating it for so long and then letting it sit for 3 hours before adding the culture?  This is a technique I've never heard before.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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honeybee
Thursday, July 21, 2011, 9:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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grey rabbit
Friday, July 22, 2011, 2:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
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Quoted Text
What is the reason for initially heating it for so long and then letting it sit for 3 hours before adding the culture?
The only thing I can think of is to get the milk to 85C like this recipe and then to let it get back down to 44C.

Since this is the first time since a loooong break in my yogurt making career , I wanted to make sure all the temps were correct. Usually when I'm cooking anything I 'wing it' and someday I may feel comfortable telling the correct temp by putting the milk jar to my cheek like you do Victoria, but I'm not quite ready for that! I heated the milk to 185F and stirred it for 2min. it is now cooling in a water bath. I've sterilized some old canning jars and lids and will proceed when the temp is right!


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Victoria
Friday, July 22, 2011, 3:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from grey rabbit
The only thing I can think of is to get the milk to 85C like this recipe and then to let it get back down to 44C.

Since this is the first time since a loooong break in my yogurt making career , I wanted to make sure all the temps were correct. Usually when I'm cooking anything I 'wing it' and someday I may feel comfortable telling the correct temp by putting the milk jar to my cheek like you do Victoria, but I'm not quite ready for that! I heated the milk to 185F and stirred it for 2min. it is now cooling in a water bath. I've sterilized some old canning jars and lids and will proceed when the temp is right!

Good for you!    I can't wait to hear if it works!!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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grey rabbit
Friday, July 22, 2011, 2:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
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Well, I think it worked! The yogurt is more the consistency of a thick kefir, but from everything I've heard about using goat milk that is to be expected. I actually like kefir but it is a black dot and yogurt is a diamond, so I get the best of both. I found some Stonyfield yogurt that was just organic milk, s. thermophilus, l. bulgariculus, l. acidophilus, bifidus and l. casei with no other fillers. I am going to order some polyflora and try that too. So, I have figured out a way to continue to support a local goat milk producer and have something good for me


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Victoria
Friday, July 22, 2011, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I'm so glad you have goat yogurt!    

When I used to make goat yogurt using store-bought cultures, I ended up with yogurt that was like a thick drink.  Good, but it didn't 'set up' the way I hoped.  Since I successfully started a batch with Polyflora B many months back, I'm able to reuse my own yogurt and the yogurt is thick and can be spooned out just like the commercial yogurts.  I have no idea if the other blood type Polyfloras work as well, but I'm greatly pleased with the way the type B probiotic works as a yogurt starter.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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ruthiegirl
Friday, July 22, 2011, 4:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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When I used to buy goat milk yogurt, there were two different brands I tried. Yo-goat was made from 100% goat milk yogurt;  the ingredients were simply goat milk and cultures (I didn't buy the sweetened flavored varieties.) This was sold as a beverage, since goat milk yogurt is naturally a thick liquid. The other brand, Red Hill Farm, was the consistency of cow's milk yogurt (spoonable) but they added thickeners to the yogurt.

If you've  got something the thickness of kefir, then you've made goat milk yogurt.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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grey rabbit
Friday, July 22, 2011, 4:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
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Looks like there are different strains of bacteria in the different formulas,

polyflora A: Bifidobaterium bifidus, Lacto bacillus plantarum and lactobacillus reuteri.

polyflora B: lactobacillus bulgaricus and lactobacillus sporogenes.

When I get some polyflora A I will try it and let you know how/if it works.

Quoted Text
If you've  got something the thickness of kefir, then you've made goat milk yogurt.


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Victoria
Friday, July 22, 2011, 5:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from ruthiegirl

If you've  got something the thickness of kefir, then you've made goat milk yogurt.


This was always true for me when I used other starters, but the Polyflora B makes a goat yogurt that 'stands up' very well.  I noticed this morning as I was making yogurt, when I spooned out some to use as a starter, the yogurt did not fill in the space that I scooped out.  That's amazing to me, because I've been making my own yogurt for many years and have never had this much success.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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