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Yogurt  This thread currently has 3,294 views. Print Print Thread
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Chloe
Saturday, April 5, 2014, 7:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/products/organic-cottage-cheese

Spring, This is cultured cottage cheese if you're interested and can find this brand.

What other dairy options does SWAMI give you?


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Drea
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Quoted Text


BTW, here's the video...(second box underneath photo with green arrow) .it looks amazingly easy.
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/automatic-yogurt-maker/



If I could find exactly this base with a single glass jar big enough to hold 2 quarts of milk, for a reasonable price, I would purchase it in a heartbeat!


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
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Drea
Saturday, April 5, 2014, 11:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Drea


If I could find exactly this base with a single glass jar big enough to hold 2 quarts of milk, for a reasonable price, I would purchase it in a heartbeat!


Found it! Ordered it...will be here on Wednesday. Sweet!


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Jane
Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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I used refrigerated almond milk that I put in a pot on the sink with warm water to take the chill out and then added two polyflora and put in the 7 jars and into the yogurt maker.  I let it sit for 8 hours but it didn't set.  I went on line this morning and it said that with almond milk you have to start with something you've made yourself and then add all this stuff.  Maybe I should have added something sugary like agave or maple syrup for the polyflora to interact with.  I'll try again.  
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deblynn3
Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Jane I didn't add any sweet at all, I'm just not sure if any of the gums or whatever would interfere with polyflora and I warmed mine to about 110F added polyflora about 85, not know what temps the polyflora could take.   I still haven't made a second batch will try this afternoon, I have to make more almond milk.


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Jane
Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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deblynn, thanks!  Can you give me the proportions....how much almond milk and how many polyflora.  I'm guessing that you are right and that the stabilizers in the refrigerated almond milk that I bought are the problem.  When you make the almond milk, do you use blanched almonds and do you soak them overnight first?  You can tell I'm a complete neophyte...
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Drea
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Jane, when I make almond milk, I soak whole almonds for 8-12 hours, drain, rinse, drain again. Then I toss the almonds and the water in my high speed blender...Not sure if a regular blender or food processor would work, though, because I've not tried either to make almond milk. I have, however, made almond milk using organic, freshly ground almond butter (from the hfs) and water using my hand-held stick blender. Hope this helps.


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Drea
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I think the reason that the batch of yogurt I made with the polyflora took so long to set was that I used too much of the polyflora for the amount of milk. When I make cow milk yogurt with cow milk yogurt as the starter, I only use 1 Tablespoon of starter to 2 quarts of milk (the starter needs a lot of room to populate).


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Chloe
Monday, April 7, 2014, 11:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Drea
I think the reason that the batch of yogurt I made with the polyflora took so long to set was that I used too much of the polyflora for the amount of milk. When I make cow milk yogurt with cow milk yogurt as the starter, I only use 1 Tablespoon of starter to 2 quarts of milk (the starter needs a lot of room to populate).


Are you buying the Euro Cuisine yogurt maker with the 2 quart container?  I was focusing on the unit with the individual jars because they're glass.  Wondering about making yogurt in plastic!

What's the proper amount of Polyflora to use per quart of milk?

THe Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk.

Anyone ever used the starter by Yogourmet?  


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Drea
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I purchased the Yogourmet 2-quart size. I read in the comments that there is a 64 ounce jar that can be used in place of the plastic, and I'm hoping that the jar I have that looks the same will fit. I'll post my results. It's arriving on Wednesday. Looking forward!


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Drea
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Quoted from Chloe


Are you buying the Euro Cuisine yogurt maker with the 2 quart container?  I was focusing on the unit with the individual jars because they're glass.  Wondering about making yogurt in plastic!

What's the proper amount of Polyflora to use per quart of milk?

THe Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk.

Anyone ever used the starter by Yogourmet?  


I think using 5 ounces of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk is WAY too much. Everything I've read so far says to use 2 Tablespoons to 1 gallon, and that holds true to my own experience. I've only ever made cow yogurt. I'd also like to mention that if you can have cow dairy at all, making the yogurt with cow yogurt as starter is way easier, and tastier (IMO).


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Chloe
Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 12:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Drea


I think using 5 ounces of yogurt to 2 quarts of milk is WAY too much. Everything I've read so far says to use 2 Tablespoons to 1 gallon, and that holds true to my own experience. I've only ever made cow yogurt. I'd also like to mention that if you can have cow dairy at all, making the yogurt with cow yogurt as starter is way easier, and tastier (IMO).


Well I will take your advice when I try this but the Euro Cuisine video shows using 5 oz of prepared yogurt ....don't know why they use that much.

I feel my sinuses get stuffy on cow's milk  yogurt but I'm fine on sheep's milk yogurt and cheeses....so if I can find sheep's milk anywhere,  I would use my starter from the commercial sheep's milk yogurt I've been buying. It's just expensive to buy sheep's milk yogurt.  Before buying the yogurt maker, my first priority is to see if I can find sheep's milk in any local store.


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Jane
Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think my problem was that I used refrigerated almond milk and it has some stabilizers.  I used 2 polyflora.  Maybe I needed more and maybe it needed more than 8 hours.  I bought the Euro Cuisine.  It has the glass jars.  I bought the one without the automatic stop because of the comments I read that said it didn't really help that much.  It has a gauge on the front that you can set to the number of hours but I didn't pay any attention to that since it doesn't turn it off or anything.  I found a recipe online yesterday and I took it home so I don't have it with me that called for using almonds and either cashews or macadamia nuts.  It said to add a little sweetener for the yeast to feed on. I'll have to try again over the weekend.  

Drea, when you use the almond butter from the health food store (I buy that every week) do you still need to strain it?
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Chloe
Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Jane
I think my problem was that I used refrigerated almond milk and it has some stabilizers.  I used 2 polyflora.  Maybe I needed more and maybe it needed more than 8 hours.  I bought the Euro Cuisine.  It has the glass jars.  I bought the one without the automatic stop because of the comments I read that said it didn't really help that much.  It has a gauge on the front that you can set to the number of hours but I didn't pay any attention to that since it doesn't turn it off or anything.  I found a recipe online yesterday and I took it home so I don't have it with me that called for using almonds and either cashews or macadamia nuts.  It said to add a little sweetener for the yeast to feed on. I'll have to try again over the weekend.  


On  the automatic Euro Cuisine you choose the amount of hours
you want to process, it made little sense to me too that I'd want or need something automatic...
when all I really need is to know how many hours I'd want to process.  And note that on the
manual dial, then pull the plug when the time was up.  All the auto feature would be is a timer.

I carefully read the reviews on the manual shut off vs the auto and all I could tell was a $10 difference.

Only advantage I can see to automatic  shut off would be if I simply wasn't home and the unit was running and running and running...THe auto feature to me is more of a safety feature for people who might forget they've got a yogurt maker operating in the kitchen.

So at this point, I'm waiting for you to produce your perfect batch of yogurt ....and I'm still searching to see if I can find sheep's milk anywhere around here.



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Spring
Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 8:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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In response to all the aggravation about making the perfect yogurt - how long to  incubate, which milk, and which that, blah, blah, blah, in protest I went out and bought some plain Stonyfield Greek yogurt and on Sunday ate a whole half cup of it mixed into a little rice milk. Took two lactase capsules, a DPN probiotic and felt wonderful!   Of course, I don't plan to make a habit of that by any means! I think now that the soy milk I was mixing into it before is why the drink bothered me. I have never in my life had the symptoms that my brother has when he eats the least bit of lactose. Mine are more to do with muscle aches and pains which is the way it affects my sister. So I don't know what gives here. No sinus issues or anything of that sort. But this time I didn't even have the aches and pains. I have a head full of questions, to say the least!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Drea
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Jane, if I were to make almond milk from almond butter and wanted to use it for yogurt, then yes, I would strain it. If I'm going to put it in my coffee, then maybe not.


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Jane
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Thanks Drea.  The only difference I can see would be that the almonds may not have been soaked?  Does that really make a difference?
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Spring
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Quoted from Chloe
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/index.php/products/organic-cottage-cheese
Spring, This is cultured cottage cheese if you're interested and can find this brand.

What other dairy options does SWAMI give you?

Feta cheese, Mozzarella cheese, Paneer cheese, Ricotta cheese. I can eat a little, but not much, Mozzarella cheese without a problem, but the others, I have no idea where Dr. D. found these cheeses in a form that a person trying to eat a healthy diet would be willing to eat. They are full of junk (gums, etc., even in the organic versions) that I am not about to eat! The Mozzarella bothers me a lot worse than yogurt. Yogurt is easy, I can find a perfectly wonderful organic, delicious dairy product that is not outrageously expensive, to say nothing for how convenient it is. The cottage cheese I am eating now is not organic but it only has about three ingredients in it and is only lightly salted as opposed to most of the others that have an awful amount of salt in them. It is very good. My DDIL found some of the Nancy brand today that is loaded with stuff I don't want, but I agreed to try it. I will let you know how that turns out. I must say that the older I get the more weary I get of things being so complicated. I am ordering from five different companies, at least, and going to three different groceries every week. I wish Dr. D. would give people a very good reason not to eat foods that are easy to find without so much trauma. I know this can't be good for people.


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Drea
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I got my yo gourmet in the mail today, and the glass jar I have fits perfectly inside! I'm cooling down the milk to put it into the yogurt maker, as I type! So excited!


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Drea
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First batch of yogurt made in the Yogourmet 2-quart machine worked like a charm. Woke up to take the puppy out to potty, and decided to check on yogurt. It's been approximately 8 hours, and it's perfectly tangy.

I used cow milk with cow milk starter: 2 quarts of milk, heated to 180 deg F, then cooled to 110 deg F, with 1 Tablespoon starter. Perfection! And the finished product is already in its own glass jar. I'll have to get another jar if I want to make another batch before this one is finished. This particular jar was purchased to ferment with specific lid apparati. But I'm glad to find an additional use for it.

The Yogourmet is super easy, does a great job, and if you are interested in making yogurt in a single container, instead of several small jars, then this may be for you. The consistent temperature water bath is the key. And way easier than the crockpot method, though with the Yogourmet you have to heat the milk on the stove (which takes less time overall, but requires more attention). It cleans up in a snap (just have to dump the water and drain to dry), and doesn't take up a lot if space. I normally don't like single-use appliances, but after making yogurt in a variety of ways, this one is my new fave.

Almond yogurt is not that appealing to me, so I may not be making it anytime soon. I'm happy with my full fat organic cow yogurt.


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.

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Drea  -  Thursday, April 10, 2014, 10:18pm
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Spring
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http://www.nancysyogurt.com/in.....e-cheese-why-is-that
Quoted Text
Nancy's lowfat cottage cheese has a fully cultured old-fashioned flavor. We set our cottage cheese with four strains of lactic cultures, the same ones used for sour cream, instead of coagulants like rennet. We allow them to grow slowly to maximize the flavor and increase its digestibility. We use probiotic cultures in our cottage cheese for additional health benefits. The cultures pre-digest lactose or milk sugar, and lactic acid is a by-product of this growth of cultures. The result is Nancy's "tart and tangy" flavor with an abundance of live cultures. Need to sweeten it up? Fresh fruit usually does the trick!

So the question to me is how is this different from regular cottage cheese on SWAMI? Or yogurt. But I don't expect an answer to these questions. Why should I? The only thing I can think of is that Dr. D. doesn't like the particular live cultures in bought yogurt, but I have never heard anything said about that for other A-types who CAN eat yogurt, and the same probiotic blend is recommended for all A-types, whether they can eat yogurt or not. So the conundrum is if cottage cheese is re-cultured into yogurt would it be an avoid or not. Stack that up against cheeses that are the absolute pits for me that are superfoods - I can only scratch my head.....
And, Drea, just be thankful making yogurt with plain old milk is easy for you! No need to worry about "resistance" there!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin

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Chloe
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Quoted from Spring
http://www.nancysyogurt.com/in.....e-cheese-why-is-that
So the question to me is how is this different from regular cottage cheese on SWAMI? Or yogurt. But I don't expect an answer to these questions. Why should I?
And, Drea, just be thankful making yogurt with plain old milk is easy for you! No need to worry about "resistance" there!


I'm assuming (although not certain) that cultured cottage cheese has all the benefits of regular
cottage cheese plus the additional good bacteria found in yogurt.

"Curds is a dairy product obtained by curdling (coagulating) milk with rennet or an edible acidic substance such as lemon juice or vinegar and then draining off the liquid portion (called whey). Milk that has been left to sour (raw milk alone or pasteurized milk with added lactic acid bacteria or yeast) will also naturally produce curds, and sour milk cheese is produced this way. The increased acidity causes the milk proteins (casein) to tangle into solid masses, or "curds". The rest, which contains only whey proteins, is the whey. In cow's milk, 80% of the proteins are caseins. Curd products vary by region and include cottage cheese, quark (both curdled by bacteria and sometimes also rennet) and paneer (curdled with lemon juice). The word can also refer to a non-dairy substance of similar appearance or consistency, though in these cases a modifier or the word curdled is generally used (e.g. bean curds, lemon curd, or curdled eggs).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curd

Yoghurt, yogurt, yoghourt, youghurt or yogourt (see spelling below), is a dairy product produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. Fermentation of the milk sugar (lactose) produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yoghurt its texture and its characteristic tang. Soy yoghurt, a non-dairy yoghurt alternative, is made from soy milk. "

It is nutritionally rich in protein, calcium, riboflavin, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12.[1]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yogurt



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Spring
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Thanks, much, but that still doesn't answer my questions. I know how each of them are made and have done so many, many times. The key words were "on SWAMI!" I need a very good high protein drink during the spring and summer that will tide me over from one meal to the next when I am spending hours upon hours doing yard work. I have always had a dislike of dealing with powdered protein, but I do have the DPN version every morning in my drink. I don't seem to be able to face it more than once a day.


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Chloe
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Quoted from Spring
Thanks, much, but that still doesn't answer my questions. I know how each of them are made and have done so many, many times. The key words were "on SWAMI!" I need a very good high protein drink during the spring and summer that will tide me over from one meal to the next when I am spending hours upon hours doing yard work. I have always had a dislike of dealing with powdered protein, but I do have the DPN version every morning in my drink. I don't seem to be able to face it more than once a day.


can you drink kefir?  Can you use pea protein?  (it's pretty tasteless, although you said you prefer
not to use powdered protein)...i guess you could put yogurt into a smoothie.....but it seems difficult to come up with a protein drink that doesn't start with some kind of powder.

High protein food bar?  Would that work?






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Spring
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No, I can't have kefir. You can see why I am so bent on trying to make this yogurt drink work! It is absolutely perfect for my need. It is in a drink form and can be quickly assimilated and downed. Protein bars don't seem to work when you are hot and needing a lot of something to drink besides water. Some people freeze them and that seems to work for them, but they just seem to make me feel hotter. A couple of hours ago I decided to have another yogurt drink the same as I did the last time with 2 lactase and  1 probiotic. I went out and worked really hard about an hour and a half  - the temp was about 90 in the sun, and I feel wonderful. Totally! Cottage cheese makes me feel good too, but I have not found an easy, satisfactory way to make a quick drink out of cottage cheese. It is too bland besides. I don't take lactase with cottage cheese. I will see how Nancy's cottage cheese/yogurt works. I still may try to make yogurt out of cottage cheese on my own. More later....


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