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Fermenting and sprouting for our Type  This thread currently has 7,412 views. Print Print Thread
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Cristina
Monday, July 19, 2010, 8:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SwamiX Explorer A2+; L(a-b+); MN,INFP, T/ R1b-M343
Ee Dan
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Bananas are avoid in this 'A' household, but I do not see why the same recipe will not work with apples!    May try that one of these days.   thanks for sharing and to Ribbit for her guidance ...

Anyhow, an update on my fermented vegies!!  They are ready and in the fridge and today I used them in a lovely creamy rissotto made with creamy pearl barley!! They made such a difference to the dish!!  Added depth and flavour without requiring the use of salt since the sauerkratt and celery and cucumber fermentation provided that (I did not rinse them, just put them straight into the pan and stir fry a big with carrots, onion, bell pepper and leeks).

The fruit kimchi is also ready, but except for trying a bit on the first day, we have not had a chance to eat it.  That is the beauty of this diet, so many options available, such variety of colours, textures, flavours ... Heaven!!!  




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Possum
Monday, July 19, 2010, 10:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Cristina
Bananas are avoid in this 'A' household, but I do not see why the same recipe will not work with apples!   May try that one of these days.   thanks for sharing and to Ribbit for her guidance ...

Anyhow, an update on my fermented vegies!!  They are ready and in the fridge and today I used them in a lovely creamy rissotto made with creamy pearl barley!! They made such a difference to the dish!!  Added depth and flavour without requiring the use of salt since the sauerkratt and celery and cucumber fermentation provided that (I did not rinse them, just put them straight into the pan and stir fry a big with carrots, onion, bell pepper and leeks).

The fruit kimchi is also ready, but except for trying a bit on the first day, we have not had a chance to eat it.  That is the beauty of this diet, so many options available, such variety of colours, textures, flavours ... Heaven!!!  
Could you try pumpkin as an alternative?? I mean being in Q'land and all??!! If it isn't an avoid, that is...
I agree with Andy you are indeed a terrific ambassador for ER4YT
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Ribbit
Monday, July 19, 2010, 3:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I'm glad y'all have found it helpful!

You can use pumpkin in place of banana.  You could use carrot shreds in place of the zucchini in the zucchini bread.  Just add spices as desired to give it the proper flavor.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

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Lola
Monday, July 19, 2010, 8:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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shredded apple is also great


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Cristina
Monday, August 2, 2010, 3:22am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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I need to change grain suppliers, my grains are not sprouting well!!!

I have been using my fermented celery and cucumber mix in my turkey broths, but have not used much of the sauerkratt (now cabbage is an avoid  ) )

We have been eating the fruit kimchi, but to be honest it has turned out a bit too vinagratish ... that is because I used fresh apples in it, apples tend to cider ferment .. and I do not like them ... so the problem is easy solved for me, I just removed the apple pieces from my plate ... remind me not to use them next time!!!

We had the fruit kimchi with yogurt sprinkled with carob and a bit of honey (only because i knew about the vinegarish taste).  We really enjoyed it!! and it really fill us up!! Now in this fruit kimchi I have:

dried fruits, including goji, figs, dates
fresh fruits: pears, apples
nuts: almonds, walnuts, pine nuts
seeds: flax seeds, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds
question for Lola: what food group shall I put this under? veg proteins, fruits?

I still got quite a bit of this kimchi, so I may make some spelt fruit bred with it and my sourdough bread starter.





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Lola
Monday, August 2, 2010, 6:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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depending on the mix you are using and which group you put into each mix....

I would never ferment dried fruit for example.....nor nuts or grains, which do not have a natural water content when processing for fermentation.

I like mixing veggies and fruits but both fresh and juicy.....to these I add the necessary sea salt for fermentation


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Cristina
Monday, August 2, 2010, 7:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I hear you.  My recipe includes any fruit and nuts ... I like it, I know I used water on this fruit kimchi, I need to confirm that, maybe that is why they use water, because they are using fruit and nuts, I should not have mixed the fresh fruit with it ... Need to contact the owner of the recipe to confirm ...

I will put this half and half, neutral vegie protein and fruit ...  




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honeybee
Monday, September 6, 2010, 11:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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i have sprouted some white french millet and added it to a blueberry / spirulina/ yoghurt smoothie just now - not bad. (then i had some CLO - feeling like I am making friends with my swami ) I decided to sprout the millet as cooking it did not soften this grain at all - not like the usual millet.

I have soaked quinoa last night, it is already sprouting, very fast sprouter - apparently you only need to soak 30mins, not the usual 8-12 hrs.

I am using a jam jar and a metal strainer that sits over a bowl to catch any water drainage.
so far so good - no e coli   that was my concern! using organic grains, sterilising jar to defend myself from thee critters.

Thinking of making a sprouted millet / quinoa milk with what is left... any one done this? thinking maple syrup and water maybe some lemon juice / sea salt?

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honeybee  -  Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:05am
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Cristina
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I soak my Quinoa for hours in the fridge, just enough water to cover the grains to start with and they end up sprouting in the fridge ... I keep a jar always handy there and I have sprouted Quinoa on demand!  




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honeybee
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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they are super fast sprouters. do you rinse / change the water daily?
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Cristina
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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What I do is this:

Put a cup of quinoa in a jar (glass of course) with enough water to cover it by 1cm or so.  Then add a couple of drops of lemon.  Leave it on the counter for a while.  Then, eventually (it could be a couple of hours or longer but on same day for sure) I rinse them, put them back in the jar with new water and put it in the fridge to keep until I am ready to use it ... it could be that same day, it could be a few days later ...

I tend to do that with my beans as well, until I am ready to cook them, they stay in the fridge, soaking ... once I cook them I also keep the excess in their own boiling water in the fridge in a glass jar until ready to eat ... Life becomes so simple to cook meals in a hurry when you use these shortcuts ...

I do the same with rice, white or brown ... soaking happilly in the fridge ... I do not have to worry about rinsing daily so much then ...

I only rinse them when I take bits for cooking, then excess goes back to the fridge with fresh water ... it has been working great for me this way ...

Notice I use lemon for grains and beans and salt for nuts ...  




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Drea
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Cristina


Notice I use lemon for grains and beans and salt for nuts ...  


I did notice, but I questioned it. Why the difference? (I'm sorry if you've already mentioned in another post; I'm too lazy to go back and read...)


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
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Cristina
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 2:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Check the quotes below, but also, we had looooong discussions about this in previous thread, so for those who do not mind reading, you will be able to do it to your hearts content by searching our forum for 'phytates' ....

In the meantime, here is a extract that may simplify things a bit and the link it originated from ...  

http://successfulhealthcoach.com/nutrition-lifestyle/2009/11/do-you-know-how-to-soak-your-nuts.html

Quoted Text
... “Nuts are easier to digest, and their nutrients more readily available, if they are first soaked in salt water overnight, then dried in a low warm oven (or dehydrator). This method imitates the Aztec practice of soaking pumpkin or squash seeds in brine and then letting them dry in the sun before eating them whole or grinding them into meal. Salt in soaking water activates enzymes that neutralize enzyme inhibitors….” “Soaking the nuts and seeds in water neutralizes the enzyme inhibitors and can increase the vitamin and mineral content.”

“Because they are acidic, buttermilk, cultured milk, yoghurt and whey (as well as lemon juice and vinegar) activate the enzyme phytase, which works to break down phytic acid in the bran of grains. Sour milk products also provide lactic acid and lactobacilli that help break down complex starches, irritating tannins and difficult to-digest proteins. Soaking increases vitamin content and makes all the nutrients in grains more available. This method has the further advantage of so softening whole meal flour that the final product is often
indistinguishable from one made with white flour.”

I usually soak my nuts and seeds in salt water this way they will be salty and I know that salt helps digest protein. I will soak my grains in plain water or yogurt if I am making a recipe like pancakes.,,




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Lola
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 4:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Drea
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 3:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you!


Let go of resistance; feel appreciation for what is, and eagerness for what is coming.
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Victoria
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 5:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I want to happily report that I had great success . . GREAT success at making goat yogurt with my Polyflora capsules!  I don't know why I was so hesitant to experiment.  Well, yes I do;  I only get a goat milk delivery from the farm once a week and didn't want to risk messing up the milk in a way that might not end up making any kind of yogurt.  I realize that is unlikely, but, there you go.  

Thanks for the inspiration, Cristina and Lola!

I used the ratio of 1 Polyflora capsule for every 12 oz. of warm milk.  That measure is just an approximate size of the containers I was using.  It could be that 1 capsule per 2 C would work fine.  I found that it cultured faster than the milk did when I had been using a store-bought goat yogurt as the starter.  8 hours was perfect.  The first time I made it, I left it for 10 hours, because with our chilly nights this time of year, it was taking that long with the way I had been making it.  10 hours gave the culture too long and the smell was rather yeasty.  8 hours is fresh and clean smelling.

The yogurt is creamy smooth and very mild tasting, which is the way I enjoy yogurt.  It's thick like a pudding.  Now I'm using a Tb of that yogurt per 12 oz of milk to make new batches.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Cristina
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 6:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Lola
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 9:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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glad you gave it a shot!!!
it takes courage!!


in short,
it only takes but 1 polyflora for continuous yogurt delight!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!

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honeybee
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 2:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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good links and that yoghurt sounds delish...

now to become an efficient and productive sprouter. (demand > supply)

your shortcuts sound great - but afraid our fridge is overflowing - no room for bowls of grains in water... bench has been sufficient for now.

eating my quinoa and millet sprouts with salad of dates, carrot, dill, parsley & onion with dressing of lemon / EVOO/ sea salt and nutritional yeast. absolutely best lunch ever. just needs some homemade yogurt  
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Cristina
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 2:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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... gets hot and humid here ... you use and live within the requirements of your environment ... great you using those skills to better nutrient intake ...




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Victoria
Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 2:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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This is a very inspiring saga, Cristina!  Thanks so much for logging in all these hours for us all.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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maukik
Sunday, September 19, 2010, 11:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
I want to happily report that I had great success . . GREAT success at making goat yogurt with my Polyflora capsules! .......
I used the ratio of 1 Polyflora capsule for every 12 oz. of warm milk.  That measure is just an approximate size of the containers I was using.  It could be that 1 capsule per 2 C would work fine.  I found that it cultured faster than the milk did when I had been using a store-bought goat yogurt as the starter.  8 hours was perfect.  The first time I made it, I left it for 10 hours, because with our chilly nights this time of year, it was taking that long with the way I had been making it.  10 hours gave the culture too long and the smell was rather yeasty.  8 hours is fresh and clean smelling.

The yogurt is creamy smooth and very mild tasting, which is the way I enjoy yogurt.  It's thick like a pudding.  Now I'm using a Tb of that yogurt per 12 oz of milk to make new batches.  


I just tried this using 1 Polyflora for each 8oz milk.  I heated the milk to scalding, then let it cool to slightly higher than body temperature before adding the cultures.  

It didn't work after 10 hours, came out just like milk.  

I am wondering if the Ployflora could have been too old?  I had just a few left in a bottle about 3 months old.

Also, do you think it is necessary to heat to scalding if the milk is not raw, but pasturized?  



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Victoria
Monday, September 20, 2010, 1:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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How did you keep the temperature of the milk at the right level for those 10 hours?

I use warm water in a small 6-pack sized cooler that has been pre-heated first.  The chest is then wrapped in thick towels, and sits on a thick towel, as well.

It's usually perfect for me after 9 hours.  8 hours and it is sometimes too thin still.  Once I left it for longer, like 15 hours and it passed the thick stage and grew thin again, and tart. My bottle of Polyflora is at least several months old, because I buy more than one bottle at a time and store on the shelf.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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maukik
Monday, September 20, 2010, 3:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
How did you keep the temperature of the milk at the right level for those 10 hours?

I use warm water in a small 6-pack sized cooler that has been pre-heated first.  The chest is then wrapped in thick towels, and sits on a thick towel, as well.

It's usually perfect for me after 9 hours.  8 hours and it is sometimes too thin still.  Once I left it for longer, like 15 hours and it passed the thick stage and grew thin again, and tart. My bottle of Polyflora is at least several months old, because I buy more than one bottle at a time and store on the shelf.


I followed your technique mentioned on another thread.  I heated to scalding, let it cool until it didn't hurt held up to my face, added ingredients of capsules, put into cooler of hot water, wrapped in thick towel, set on another hot towel and left for about 10 hours.  It worked perfectly back about May when I used an organic yogurt for cultures.  Unfortunately, I got a bout of my long gone diverticulitis right after eating it.  I thought I would try again with my blood type Polyflora cultures. My bottle of Polyflora had been opened for about 4 months. The milk was organic pasturized.  I am looking for a raw goat milk source.  Goat milk may be easier in the long run on my intestinal tract, but I was hoping to at least try the capsules first until then.  
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Victoria
Monday, September 20, 2010, 5:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I think making yogurt is a very subjective art, and kind of fickle, honestly.     There are times my yogurt just doesn't 'yog' for some unknown reason.
maybe the milk is too hot and kills the culture
maybe there is some bacteria on the inside of the jars
maybe the chest doesn't hold the heat well enough
maybe it sits too long
maybe it sits too short a time
maybe some competing microorganisms got into the mix
maybe it's the milk, and a different brand/animal/? would change the outcome

Hard to say.  I just keep at it because healthy probiotics with some kind of healthy dairy seems to be essential for my gut health.  Right now, I've found a good source of clean, raw, local goat milk, and the Polyflora B is working well.  Otherwise, I'd just keep making yogurt, using the best choice of milk that I could find; and use a ready-made yogurt with live culture in it.  Or I'd buy packaged culture if I had to.  I just keep on ticking, like that Energizer bunny!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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