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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Pressure cooker recommendation
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Pressure cooker recommendation  This thread currently has 567 views. Print Print Thread
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Mayflowers
Tuesday, March 11, 2008, 1:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Can anyone recommend a good, long lasting pressure cooker?
I bought a $179 Rikon and it lasted 2 years of minimal use and the lid broke! I can still use it but the pressure valve sticks now.
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Spring
Tuesday, March 11, 2008, 2:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from 815
Can anyone recommend a good, long lasting pressure cooker?
I bought a $179 Rikon and it lasted 2 years of minimal use and the lid broke! I can still use it but the pressure valve sticks now.


I'm glad you brought this up, Mayflowers, because I've been wondering if pressure cooking does the same thing to foods as canning or flash freezing. I love to use my pressure cooker, but I don't want to be stirring up those polyamines, either. My question is --does pressure cooking "shock" the food too much? I con't know anyone who cares about such things except Dr. D.

Anyway, about a brand that will last a while, I have had this faithful old stainless steel Presto for 47 years, and it is still going strong! I have no idea what the quality of newer products might be from Presto but this one has certainly stood the test of time, to say the least!
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Lola
Tuesday, March 11, 2008, 3:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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I believe most canned products go through a similar process, so I believe it can t be all that bad.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Mayflowers
Tuesday, March 11, 2008, 6:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Another question for Dr. D. Thanks. I was looking at the Prestos' on Amazon and they had some bad reviews. Most of the brands had bad reviews.  It comes down to if you buy a lemon or not. It's hard to decide. I don't pressure cook all the time. My O son likes beef stew, so I make it in the pressure cooker.  I also cook beans in it.
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Spring
Tuesday, March 11, 2008, 6:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Diana, it seems that this problem is universal with appliances. If someone has something made years earlier, likely it is better than products you find today. Maybe e-Bay is the answer! Possibly you could find an older model that the newer generation is scared to death of - maybe their mother's - they want to sell. My boys used to call mine THE BOMB! I doubt their feelings have changed very much about it, either, after all this time!
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Schluggell
Wednesday, March 12, 2008, 8:51am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Old ones are fine as long as its Stainless Steel. My Mom always carried a magnet in her purse...
But you do lose in theory some nutrients as its not sealed and relies on the weight on the top.

New ones are better as they don't vent - My problem was that "someone" overheated heat it and the special seal got stiff and had to source a new one. I had a Fagor from Germany.

Also it is easier to find old ones that are big enough for canning/brewing purposes. New ones tend to be smaller mostly due to cost.

I have seen some well made styles in India but they tend to be made from Aluminium....


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Monika
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 12:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have a good quality stainless steel presser cooker that I got from india. I got the second one from indian grocery store in US. There are usually very popular among indians.


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Mayflowers
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 4:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks for the suggestions..I never thought to go to my local Indian grocer for that. Don't you just LOVE the smell of an Indian grocery store?  I can stand there sniffing all day long. My second favorite cusine. How about a nice paratha? I used to make stuffed ones...drowning in ghee...sigh...
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Lola
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 4:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Quoted Text
How about a nice paratha?

got a recipe?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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Mayflowers
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 5:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I have the book at home..I'm at work now.  It's from Krishna's Cusine, that real fat Indian Cookbook. Most of the recipes in there are out of this world. Rolling a round chapati takes practice.
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Lola
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 6:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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chapati brings back childhood memories!
my best friend in elementary school was from pakistan.....
i managed to always go to her house after school for a delicious meal with chapati!!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Monika
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 9:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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paratha/chapathi are not too difficult to make, it just takes some practice. Before I finally made a successful batch, i had thrown few batches  .
I often make it for my DH with white spelt flour.
It is just flour, ghee, salt and warm water. The idea is to make a very soft dough (not too sticky or too dry). I found that the leftover stuff from making ghee (the stuff that comes to the bottom of the pot) does the trick in making the dough very soft and easy to roll. I don't have excact measurments, but here is how I make it.
Put some spelt flour (1-2 cups)little bit of salt in a mixing bowl and add the milk solids from making ghee. If you don't have the left over stuff from making ghee, just add regular ghee (1-1.5 Tbl)Combine with the flour. Slowly add warm water and mix, keep on adding the water till the dough forms. Don't add too much, you don't the dough to be too sticky. Knead for at least 5 min. Let stend covered with wet kitchen napkin for 1-2 hrs. Divide into samll balls (size of golf balls) cover in some flour and sprinkle flour on the rolling board. Roll into thin circles. Cook on a non-stick flat griddle 2 min or so on each side. Spread some ghee on top and keep in covered warm container. You really need a non-stick pan for this. i hate to use non-stick, but this is the only time I use it.
Theere might be some tutorial online if you search for it.


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Lola
Thursday, March 13, 2008, 10:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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thanks!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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TJ
Friday, March 14, 2008, 1:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Schluggell
Old ones are fine as long as its Stainless Steel. My Mom always carried a magnet in her purse...


Not all stainless steel is magnetic.  I know, crazy isn't it!  This is something I learned from dad.  For example, my stainless utensils are magnetic, but my stainless pots and pans aren't, or at least they are only very weakly magnetic.
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