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kate4975
Monday, December 10, 2007, 11:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Since I'm a nonnie, I'm trying to find beneficial alternatives/additions to spelt flour for baking. I've checked http://www.foodsubs.com and it says millet flour tends to make baked goods coarse and dry.

Has anyone successfully substituted millet in whole or in part for other flours in cookies, sweet or savory crusts, cakes, etc.? What modifications do you have to make to the other ingredients (less flour overall? more egg/liquid?)?

My family likes our baked goods once in a while so I'm trying to make them as not bad as possible.  


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Debbie53
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 12:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kate,

   I once daycared a little boy with Celiac and so in order for him to have cookies etc. especially at Christmas, I started experimenting.  You will find that a mix of flours works best.  The rice flours tend to pick up more moisture and so you may need to add more liquid to those recipes (muffins, cakes etc...banana muffins work really well!)  
  For cookies I used to mix it in a cup at a time until you get the right consistency (softer for drop cookies and firmer for cut out/refrigerator cookies).  I used both brown and white rice flour, soy flour, tapioca flour and chickpea flour.(not sure if any are avoids for you)  Brown rice flour has a tendency to make things grainy textured, so I usually  used white instead.  Mix them in different amounts for each recipe until you find a combination you like.
   It's not the same texture as wheat flour and without the gluten and it's more crumbly but all in all not bad.


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honeybee
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 2:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I also mix flours together.. if it say 3 cups plain flour i use 1 1/2 spelt and 1 1/2 millet..works out fine so far in breads.

Especially a spelt pastry crust-using spelt only, there is a great almond pastry crust here:
http://www.latartinegourmande.com/2007/08/13/olive-oil-crust-tart/
using quinoa!

Warning! That link contains explicit use of French baked goods!

Leave out the xanthum gum too, but a swish of olive oil helps

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honeybee  -  Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 3:22am
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Henriette Bsec
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 8:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have only used millet as a substitute for corn flour.. and that seem to be ok... somtimes bit dry - but since the recipes that use cornflour often use a lot of liquid it seem to be ok.


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Curious
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 8:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have used millet flour with rice flour to make pancakes. It seems to work, but only when I soak both overnight (I make my own millet and rice flour). If I don't soak them, the pancakes break easily.
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Lola
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good point there!
soaking these flours is important I agree!


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Henriette Bsec
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Kyosha Nim
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Good tip about the soaking... I normally soak all wholegrain flour...
but normally I don´t soak rice,,, but I´ll try that next time I bake with rice  
I would say it would be difficult to use millet with yeast... since yeast bread needs gluten to work proper
Now spelt is neutral for B nons so it might not be a disaster to use some as well as the millet  
rather that than making a bread that doesn´t work.
Food should be nice to eat  



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gulfcoastguy
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Barley is also a neutral for B's and it has some gluten. That might make it rise easier than millet.
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ABJoe
Tuesday, December 11, 2007, 10:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Curious
I have used millet flour with rice flour to make pancakes. It seems to work, but only when I soak both overnight (I make my own millet and rice flour). If I don't soak them, the pancakes break easily.

So make the pancake batter the night before, all except the rising agents - then add the rising agent(s) shortly before baking?  Am I reading this correctly?


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Curious
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Quoted from ABJoe

So make the pancake batter the night before, all except the rising agents - then add the rising agent(s) shortly before baking?  Am I reading this correctly?


The way I do it is as follows: I grind the rice and millet and soak it in water overnight. In the morning I add eggs and anything else I want to add (e.g. chocoolate poweder if I want dark pancakes).
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Lola
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do you grind half a cup of each?
and how many cups of water?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Curious
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Quoted from Lola
do you grind half a cup of each?
and how many cups of water?


Probably a bit more rice than millet, but I never measure. I then use enough water so that all the flour is wet. In the morning I add more water if the consistency is too hard. Then I add 2 eggs (if I use about 1 cup of flour alltogether). The chocolate powder is nice, or carob is nice as well. I have also added sesame seeds.
I have also experimented with adding amaranth flour (I buy the amaranth flour, don't seem to be able to get hold of the grains) or quinoa flour (I grind that myself).
When I did not know that I was a nonnie, I loved buckwheat pancakes. They were my favorites. My receipe was very simple: Grind buckwheat flour, add water to soak it overnight, add more water in the morning if necessary. Add 2 eggs and fry it in ghee, butter or olive oil
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Lola
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thanks!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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ABJoe
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I've always used spelt to sub for wheat, never anything to sub for spelt...

I have subbed rice for corn, but need to experiment more with other grain (millet, amaranth) and legume flours (lentil, pinto bean).  

I was considering working with sweet potato flour, but since the A's in our house can't eat them, I'll focus on foods we can all eat.  


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karen
Friday, December 14, 2007, 2:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi Curious, do you refrigerate the rice and millet flour while they are soaking?
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Curious
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Quoted from karen
Hi Curious, do you refrigerate the rice and millet flour while they are soaking?


No, I leave them out in the kitchen. If it would be very, very hot (above 35 degrees Celsius - don't know what that is in Fahrenheit), I would consider putting them in the fridge.
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Henriette Bsec
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Quoted from Curious


No, I leave them out in the kitchen. If it would be very, very hot (above 35 degrees Celsius - don't know what that is in Fahrenheit), I would consider putting them in the fridge.


above 95 F  


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karen
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Thanks Curious and Henriette(for the temp. conversion).
That's what I did and was hoping it wasn't spoiled.  I only used rice flour but the muffins turned out great - definitely less crumbly than without soaking.
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Brighid45
Friday, January 4, 2008, 5:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Melissa asked me for a millet flaxseed bread recipe. I did some searching through my own cookbooks and also a google search, and came up with nothing useable as far as yeasted breads go. Yeast needs a gluten structure, and GF flours obviously have none. So I checked for a quickbread recipe and found one. I made some modifications, but BE WARNED--I haven't had the chance to test this myself yet. This is just intuitive changes based on my own experiences with GF flours and batter or quickbreads. So if you are willing to experiment and see what works for you, give this recipe a try.

The advice to soak GF flours overnight is well worth taking. For this recipe you could soak the millet and oat/amaranth/quinoa flours along with the ground flaxseed, in the cup of water. (You can add a tiny bit more water if the mixture is on the dry side, but be careful--it's easier to add more water than to take too much out!) Then add in the other ingredients when you're ready to bake. I'd say add the oil, sweetener and egg first, to let the flours and flaxseed hydrate even more. Then add in the baking powder and salt.

If you don't want the flaxseeds themselves in the bread, soak them separately and scoop out the 'goop' to use in the recipe. I like the look of the seeds in the bread though, it makes a very rustic and charming looking loaf.

Using blackstrap in the recipe will make a darker, somewhat sweet and fragrant loaf. Veggie glycerine will add moistness and sweetness, as will agave nectar. If you don't want a sweet loaf, cut back on the sweetener and try adding another egg to make up for the loss of liquid. Another addition could be some almond butter. Later on, when goat's milk is okay to use again, you could add it in in place of the sweetener.

This batter will probably be fairly sticky. Just make sure everything is mixed in well before you pour it into the loaf pan. Also, grease just the bottom of the baking pan. If you grease the sides you make it hard for the batter to stay risen. After all, how well would you do climbing a greased rope? When the bread is baked, run a knife around the edges inside the pan to release the loaf.

Of course this would make a good base for a sweet quickbread. Adding in nuts and dried fruits would create a delicious tea loaf, or just adding all the sweetener would make a great sweet toasting bread, perfect for black currant jam and ghee!

You can probably successfully double this recipe, if making one loaf at a time is not practical for you. Quickbreads generally freeze pretty well for short periods, but can be more crumbly and fragile upon thawing.

Hope this is helpful to y'all as a stopgap measure, until we can find some good recipes to make some yummy bread!

Millet flaxseed bread

1 1/2 cups millet flour
1/2 cup oat, amaranth or quinoa flour
1 egg
3 tablespoons ground flaxseed
3 tablespoons corn-free/aluminum-free baking powder
1/2teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup light olive oil (or compliant oil of choice)
1/4 cup blackstrap molasses, veggie glycerine or agave nectar
1 cup water

If desired, soak flours overnight in the cup of water and blackstrap/sweetener. Do NOT add in the baking powder and salt-just the flours.

Preheat oven to 375F. Grease one 9 x 5" loaf pan. Mix or put soaked dry ingredients in a bowl. Pour in cooking oil, egg, and liquids if you did not soak the flours. Add in the baking powder and salt now if you soaked the flours. Stir completely until mix is thick and moist. Spoon batter into loaf pan. Bake 45 minutes to 1 hour or until tester comes out clean.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison

Revision History (2 edits)
Brighid45  -  Sunday, January 6, 2008, 12:49am
Brighid45  -  Sunday, January 6, 2008, 12:48am
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Drea
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Brig, I notice that there are several erroneous letters in your recipes...could you clarify the actual measurements?


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Brighid45
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I saw them and corrected (Office Word2000, GRRR)--let me know if they're still not right, I'll go back in and fix them again.


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Drea
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Looks good! Thanks!


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Brighid45
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Excellent Enjoy, and if you or anyone else gives this recipe a try, please post the results here if you would. I'll try it this weekend after I buy some millet flour.


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Brighid45
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Okay, I baked my first loaf. Soaked the flours overnight, added in everything else, put it in the oven. Smelled good baking, nice and fragrant; baked for about 45-50 minutes. Took the loaf out and . . . it had fallen. I mean we're talking FALLEN.

After letting the loaf cool for a few minutes, I cut a slice and spread it with a bit of ghee. It was very crumbly and fragile but tasted glorious! It reminds me of a cross between my mom's wonderful brown bread and a really good loaf of cornbread. It was somewhat overbaked but still tender and moist, with lots of flavor. Soaking the flours worked really well. And best of all--a half hour after the first slice, no bloated tummy or brain fog!

So--modifications are in order. I'd say first off, less baking powder would be the first change. More flaxseed would be the second. A lower baking temperature is also called for.

My next batch will have 5 tablespoons of ground flaxseed, 1 tablespoon of baking powder, and will be baked at 350F. I'll post results here.

I'm off to enjoy another slice!


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geminisue
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Just found this recipe, have not tried, leave me know if anyone tries it, how it is
MMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.02
      Title: Millet Bread
Categories: Breads, Yeast, Gluten-free
      Yield: 1 loaf

      1 c  Plain yogurt or buttermilk
    1/4 c  Butter
      1 tb Honey
      1 pk Dry yeast
    1/4 c  Warm water
      2    Eggs
      2 c  Millet Flour
    1/2 c  Soy Flour

  Combine yogurt and butter in saucepan, heating slowly to melt butter.
  Dissolve yeast and honey in the warm water; add yogurt mixture and
  blend. Beat in eggs; add flours and beat well.  Pour into well-oiled
  4" x 8" loaf pan and let rise for 45 minutes.  Bake at 375 F. for
  40-45 minutes or until done.  Cool before cutting.

  Source: Arrowhead Mills "Recipes for Special Dietary Needs" tri-fold
  Reprinted by permission of Arrowhead Mills, Inc. Electronic format
  courtesy of: Karen Mintzias
I'm sure it can be made compliant to blood type or genotype
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