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jax129
Monday, November 12, 2007, 3:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Being a B, I want to cook with oat flour instead of wheat flour but need to know, can I use the same recipe and just substitute the oat instead of the wheat or do I need a whole new recipe?
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Henriette Bsec
Monday, November 12, 2007, 5:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Not in yeast breads,, oats do not rise as well as wheat.
I use aprox 1/3 oat and 2/3 spelt when I want a moist bread.

I often use oat in cookies and crackers since the lack of good gluten does not effect the cookies and crackers- crackers gets very crispy and wholesome


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Ribbit
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 2:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oat flour is gummy and seems to just mush up when you substitute it part for part.  If you can eat eggs, you can make some really great oat flour muffins, just go light on the liquid.  You may have to play around with it a tidbit to see if you can get it just right, but when I've made oat muffins I can't add all the liquid called for in the original recipe.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

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eh
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 2:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Sam Dan
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Oat flour makes a good thickener but is not a good substitute for bread flours and cake flours etc. unfortunately.
eh


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italybound
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 3:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Henriette Bsec
I often use oat in cookies and crackers since the lack of good gluten does not effect the cookies and crackers- crackers gets very crispy and wholesome


when I use oat flour ifor cookies, they fall apart. any suggestions besides not adding all the liquid.



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Henriette Bsec
Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 4:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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well I almost never use 100 % oats.

I soak my oat flour for at least 6 hours and add the rest of the ingredients....

Like when I do scottish oatcake= oat crackers.
I add boiling water to oats/oatflour combo let it stand night over - add a bit of ghee, salt and baking powder and roll out thin and bake - untill golden and crisp- ( takes a looong time  )

When I bake cookies- I combine oat, spelt, maybe a bit of yoghurt ( if it is for Bs ) or water and butter/ghee let it stand before I add egg - sugar etc.

Often you actually need more liquid - cause oats sucks up  more liquid than spelt.

Do you use rolled oats or oatflour ?


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Ribbit
Friday, November 16, 2007, 2:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Well, maybe when you soak the oats they absorb more liquid than spelt.  That's interesting.  Will you give us your oatcake recipe?


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

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Henriette Bsec
Friday, November 16, 2007, 3:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Ok
the oatcake ( cracker) recipe I use is:

Oatcake Recipe

8 oz/ 225 g  Fine  Oatmeal     ( pinhead- or I use rolled oats processed to flour)
1/2 tsp Barcarbonate of Soda or a little bit baking powder
Pinch of Salt     
2 tbl Melted Butter/ghee     
4-5 oz fl / 140-150 ml Hot Water     
Extra Oatmeal for rolling     

Method:     Set the oven to 375F / 190 C
Mix the oatmeal, the bicarbonated of soda and salt together in a bowl. Add the melted ghee and the hot water. Stir well until it makes a soft paste. let it stand for a few hours if you have time...
Sprinkle some oatmeal on a board. From the dough into a round and roll it out as thinly as possible, adding oatmeal to the serface as necessary, to prevent sticking.
Brush off the excess oatmeal. Cut the dough into 4 or 6 pieces.

To oven bake; place on a large ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 15-20 minutes.
Do not let the oatcakes brown; they should be a pale fawn colour.

Traditionally these were griddle baked.
Sometimes I bake them at a lower temp for a longer time.
They are good with a anything fatty - like cheese



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Stormy
Friday, November 16, 2007, 9:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from italybound


when I use oat flour ifor cookies, they fall apart. any suggestions besides not adding all the liquid.


I posted a recipe for Ricey Oat Flour biscuits.  They are quite good and satisfy my need for doughy things.  I've modified it a bit and now use 1 cup oat flour, 1/2 cup rice flour and 1/2 cup amaranth flour.

Also add extra rice flour as I'm kneading the dough, if it gets too gummy.  Workds really well for biscuits.


Faith and Hope
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Brighid45
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 2:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oatcakes are awesome. You can put them in an airtight container and serve them for snacks with nut butters, all-fruit jam and ghee, or thinly sliced cheese. They are very easy to make and pretty tasty too!

If you can't find medium oats in your grocery store or HFS, you can easily make your own. Just process a cup of rolled oats at a time in a blender or food processor until they are the consistency you need.

I'll share one of my all-time favorites with you, from the cookbook Classic Scots Cookery. This is an old, old recipe and absolutely delicious if you like the plain, unadorned taste of oats. The less water you use, the crispier the oatcake will be, and it will also curl, which is a sign of a truly good oatcake. You can make medium oatmeal by whizzing rolled oats in a blender or food processor until they resemble coarse crumbs. Quick-cooking oats are an okay substitute in a pinch. Work fast to shape the dough while it is still warm.

Girdle (griddle) Oatcakes
makes 1 round, or 4 farls (triangles)

125g/4 1/2 oz medium oatmeal
pinch of sea salt
1 tablespoon/15 ml melted ghee or butter
125ml/4 fluid oz boiling water
oat flour/pinhead oats for rolling out the cake


Mixing and shaping: Put the oatmeal in a bowl and add the salt. Make a well in the center, add the melted butter and work into the oats, mixing through. When well mixed, add the boiling water and mix to make everything come together in a firm, not crumbly, ball. Dust the work surface with oat flour or pinhead oats and press the oat mixture out into a rough round. Roll out to about 5mm/1/4 inch thick. Keep pinching the edges together to keep them even. Cut into farls (triangles) and leave them to dry for an hour. This helps them to 'curl'.

Baking:  Heat the girdle and grease. Test the heat by sprinkling some flour on the girdle. It should turn light brown in a few minutes. If the flour browns very quickly, the girdle is too hot. You can also test the heat by holding your hand over the surface. It should feel hot, but not fiercely so.

Place the four farls on the girdle and leave to bake until they have dried out and are curled at the edges. This will only happen if they are thin enough. Thick oatcakes will not curl and may need to be baked on both sides. If very thin and well curled, stand on end (a toast rack works perfectly for this) and put in a warm place to dry completely. They can then be stored in an airtight tin, or stored in dry oats (the traditional method, which gives them a wonderful taste). They may be dried out in a warm oven before use.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison

Revision History (2 edits)
Melissa_J  -  Sunday, January 20, 2008, 5:24am
Adjusted thickness, see Brighid's later post
Brighid45  -  Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 6:44pm
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Olerica
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 4:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I am so thankful that you all are here to test out these recipes!  I've been thrown a curve not being able to use wheat, rye and sprouted wheat anymore.  Bless you, bless you.


"To be nobody-but-yourselfin a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody elsemeans to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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Brighid45
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 6:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You are more than welcome. I'm just delighted beyond words to be able to eat favorite recipes again, like oatcakes.


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lakes-lady68
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 5:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi All, I'll dig out one of my books but I'm sure I have a suitable recipe for cranachan (made with oats, honey (use agave), cream (I'd use ricotta or quark) and raspberries.   I'll get back to you when I've found it.  

Thanks for that Brighid, can't wait to try them, reminds me of being back Edinburgh


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Brighid45
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 6:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cranachan, one of the great desserts of Celtic cuisine! But you have to add a little unfiltered uisge to it, you know. Otherwise it's just lacking something And you must toast the oats before adding them in, imo anyway. The nutty taste adds so much to the whole complex of flavors!

Btw, I posted the oatcake recipe to Recipe Central. I'll see if I can find my old recipe for oat bannocks. They're good for any meal--I've had them for breakfast, lunch and dinner and enjoyed them every time.


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lakes-lady68
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 6:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It just reminds me so much of family in Edinburgh and visits to Craigmiller.  My brother and I ran up to the ramparts expecting to look down and have a mock battle with imaginary foes, only to find the other side of the castle only has a tiny wall and had sheep on the other side.   Oh the childish disappointment lol.

yes the toasting is critical, you're spot on there Brighid.

Oooh Oat Bannocks, delicious.    They'd be lovely with my first batch of cottage cheese, just finished making it and it's turned out very well.   Thanks for that, you're a star!  


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Paula 0+
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 7:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Please do post the recipe for "cranachan".....don't know what it is, but the ingredients sound wonderful and also gatherer friendly!
Paula
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lakes-lady68
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 7:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Will do Paulam, just looking for the book I found it in, it's in a safe place   lol.


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geminisue
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I have a chart that says you need to use 1 1/3 cup oat flour to replace 1 cup of flour.  
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Brighid45
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 11:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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If you are replacing wheat flour with oat flour, you may also need more liquid in your recipe, as oats tend to be a little more thirsty than wheat.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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Brighid45
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 11:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cranachan is a sort of communal dessert--you put out all the ingredients and let everyone make their own. It's best made on the spot. Here is my recipe, LL please post yours too. The more recipes the better!

You can omit the whipped cream if you like. I have had it both ways and actually prefer just the soft cheese. The traditional fruit used is raspberries (as this is actually a harvest-time dessert) but use your imagination.

Cranachan

425ml/15 fluid oz double cream, whipped
125g/4 oz coarse or pinhead oatmeal, lightly toasted
(you can also use quick oats if you like)
225g/8oz crowdie or other soft sharp cheese, or creme fraiche
(I've used ricotta to good effect here, paneer or quark would probably be all right too--add a bit of lemon juice to give the cheese a sharper taste)
450g/1 lb soft fruit (raspberries, blackcurrants, strawberries, etc)
bottle of light malt whiskey (Lowland whiskey is good here as it's sweeter and more mellow than Highland)
jar of flower honey
(agave nectar would be an okay substitute here)

Place the cream and crowdie in one bowl and mix well. Put the fruit in another bowl and the toasted oatmeal in a smaller bowl. Place the three bowls in the center of the table with the bottle of whiskey and jar of honey. Provide each guest with a bowl and a spoon.

Begin with the cream/crowdie mixture, sprinkle with oatmeal and add the fruit and honey. Finally pour over some whiskey to lubricate and mix. Adjust whiskey and honey to taste and enjoy!


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Lola
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 1:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
first batch of cottage cheese, just finished making it and it's turned out very well.

yes, do post your step by step recipe!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Brighid45
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 1:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Here is another good recipe using oats. Skirlies is a delicious side dish. Try it in place of rice or potatoes for dinner, or as a savory breakfast.

Skirlie

50g/1 1/2 oz butter or ghee
1 onion - finely chopped
175g/app 6 oz oatmeal
Sea salt and pepper to taste

Melt the butter in a pan and add the onion, frying gently to soften. Stir in the oatmeal, season and cook gently for 10 minutes. Serve and enjoy!


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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TypeOSecretor
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 8:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Our Costco has been carrying bags of something called "Coaches Oats."  The oats are toasted and I think steel cut.  It makes great tasting oatmeal and super oatmeal cookies (before Genotype).  I suspect it could be made into flour.

By the way, thanks for all the great recipes.
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lakes-lady68
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 4:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lola

yes, do post your step by step recipe!


Hi Lola

The recipe was from one of the other threads but I changed it a bit.  Here is the link

http://www.recipezaar.com/46595

I followed this method but used half a gallon of milk, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 1/2 tsp salt.  It's so creamy.   Took a while to come up to heat but it was worth it.


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Brighid45
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 6:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You're welcome, TOS. I'm just so excited to have oats back in my diet! I grew up eating oatmeal every morning in the winter and having oatmeal cookies and bannocks. I'm used to my protein breakfasts now and wouldn't trade them for the world, but it's nice to know if I want 'parritch' for breakfast now and then, it's not only okay, it's good for me!

I've never heard of coaches oats, but if they are steel-cut and toasted they should indeed be pretty tasty. Steel-cut oats in place of rolled oats in oatmeal is a big revelation--they are creamy and bursting with flavor. With that in mind, here is my number one, all time favorite recipe for oats. It's a very old recipe and beyond-words delicious on a cold, blustery, snowy morning. Try this with some toasted nuts sprinkled on top. (I tend to eat my oats the savory Scots way--with just a little salt--so feel free to add dried fruit etc as you wish.)

Overnight Oatmeal

If you have a small one-quart/one-liter slow cooker, that's perfect for overnight cooking. If you don't have a slow cooker, you can still make creamy oats--just soak them overnight in the cold water, and simmer them gently in the morning until they are thick and creamy.

(If you have a woodstove with a hot water reservoir shroud, you can place the oats atop the shroud to cook overnight as well, which is how my grandmother used to make them. An ovenproof casserole or earthenware crock with a cover works best.)

Using old-fashioned rolled oats or steel-cut oats, measure out 1/3 cup/app 57g/app 2 oz oats for each person (with an extra 1/3 cup for the pot). For each serving add 2/3 cup/163ml/5.5 fl oz fresh cold water--ice water is best, but otherwise as cold as you can get. Stir the oats and water together and soak or cook overnight, 8-10 hours. When ready to serve, add a pinch of sea salt and if desired, sprinkle with toasted walnuts, almonds or pecans.

Leftover oatmeal can be used to make skirlies, if you want to be very Scots-like about economy.


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Lola
Friday, January 11, 2008, 12:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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thanks LL!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Melissa_J
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I just started a thread over at GTD with the same title, though I was seeing double when I noticed it here.  To add to the doubleness, I'll post it over here too.  I'm still very novice at using oat anything, so I look forward to trying the recipes in this thread!

I found a recipe online http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/Food/Wheatfree.html#Oat%20Muffins and modified it below.

Oat Muffins
3 cup oat flour
3/8 tsp sea salt
3 1/2 T baking powder
4 1/2 tsp agave
3/4 cup cold water
2 T grapeseed oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Sift dry ingredients into a bowl. Add cold water and mix until smooth. Stir in the oil and pour into muffin cups that have been greased. Bake for 20-25 mins. Makes 12 modest muffins.

These tasted lovely, were very dense and a bit crumbly.  I think flax meal or flax goo would make a good addition to them.  They weren't very sweet, but you can add agave or glycerine when serving, if you want sweeter.  I think a little more oil might be good.  They were hard to get smooth on top, but I didn't try all the tricks (like patting them on top with an oiled baggie).  I'm not sure, but I may try it, quinoa flour may be a nice addition to this recipe?

I'll keep experimenting.  I'd like to figure out how to make oat bread, but I'm starting small.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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Brighid45
Friday, January 11, 2008, 12:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for the recipe Melissa! Can't wait to try it! (I'd bet flaxseed would be delicious in the muffin mix and definitely help give it some structure.) And please feel free to post the recipes listed here to your thread at the GTD site, if you like.

Right now I'm trying to work out a recipe for oat bannocks, which are sort of like baking soda biscuits, only made with oats of course. The sticking point is the use of buttermilk in the recipe. I just haven't found a suitable substitute yet. You really need the buttermilk to make the whole thing work. I'll keep on trying though. Oat bannocks are delicious with a big bowl of vegetable soup or beef stew!


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Lola
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try cottage cheese or ricotta or paneer adding water to your mixer until you get the right consistency of buttermilk.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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lakes-lady68
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Look forward to trying the bannocks Brighid.  
I'll give the oat muffins a try today, thanks Melissa


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Brighid45
Friday, January 11, 2008, 12:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for the suggestion Lola, I have to make a new batch of paneer since ours is gone already--I used it all in some pasta-free veggie lasagna Once we have some I'll make some bannocks and post the results here. I have a recipe for beremeal (barley) bannocks as well, very tasty!

Oat muffins are baking as I type this, Melissa--thanks for sharing the recipe! I added an egg, we'll see how they turn out.

I haven't found a good recipe yet for yeasted oat bread. Most of the ones I've looked at have way too much wheat flour in them--necessary for the bread to rise, but not so good gluten-wise. I need to get more oat flour, once I'm stocked up again I'll do some experimenting and post any successes here. A yeasted batter oat bread might work. It's a good day to bake here--rainy, windy and chilly! Having the oven on makes the kitchen/living room nice and warm, and the baking muffins smell good too.


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Melissa_J
Saturday, January 12, 2008, 12:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I bet the egg will be nice in them...

I made my first batch of cheese last night, Farmers.  Very soft and mild, and a bit crumbly... I love it.  I made a caprese salad with it today, it's not fresh mozzarella, but it's fresh. I opened my bottle of balsamic vinegar I bought years ago and never opened on account of it being an avoid.  It was good.  Mozzarella will be nice in a few months, caprese salads are about the only gluten free thing I can find at some italian restaurants.


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Saturday, January 12, 2008, 1:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I made my first batch of cheese last night

any tips on how you applied the recipe?


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Oat muffins were delicious! A bit crumbly but moist and tender. I'll put in some dried cranberries next time. Thanks for the recipe!


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Brighid45
Saturday, January 19, 2008, 10:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just noticed a typo in the oatcakes recipe I posted. The rollout thickness is listed as 5mm/3/4 inch. It should be 5mm/1/4 inch. This makes a big difference in the way the oatcakes bake on the griddle! Apologies if this caused difficulties for anyone attempting the recipe.


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Melissa_J
Saturday, January 19, 2008, 10:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cranberries would be nice in them...

For the cheese, I just brought 1/2 gallon whole milk almost to a boil (190 degrees) over medium heat, which took a long time.  Stir occasionally.  Once it reaches 190 F, or tiny bubbles start to form, remove from heat, add 1/4 cup lemon juice, stir a bit, then let it sit for 5-10 minutes until it looks like the curds and whey have separated, then filter it through cheesecloth (I used it in a tofu press, and pushed out the whey with that).  I'm not too exact about it all, but then I'm not very picky.  http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Home-Made-Farmers-Cheese/Detail.aspx


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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meribelle
Sunday, January 20, 2008, 2:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I dredged some chicken (I am not supposed to have it now, but I have to use it up!) in oat flour and sauteed it in olive oil.  Hubby said it was wonderful.  Salt and cayenne pepper, of course!


Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again.  Blessings, meribelle
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Sunday, January 20, 2008, 11:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I tried Melissa's oat muffins recipe today, with a cup of blackcurrants, added 1 egg (as per Brighid's suggestion) and upped the amount of Agave to 3T to counteract the sour of the blackcurrants.   Baked at same temperature and time, they came out of the oven lightly browned, almost crisp outside, lovely texture with less crumbling than I expected.   Very pleased, these could be my new addiction  

I'll give it another go in a day or two with some flax meal to replace part of the oat flour and see how that turns out.

Loraine


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Olerica
Sunday, January 20, 2008, 3:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I tried the muffins today too, subbing buttermilk for the water and adding dried cranberries (which I had on hand) and the aforementioned egg.  They rose beautifully, but really reminded me of scones... in a good way.  I served them with ghee and honey.

I think that with the buttermilk, I'd cut the baking powder by a tablespoon.  I might add a bit more liquid.  

DH (who, admittedly is a Nomad and for whom buttermilk is an avoid), liked them, but thought they were a little salty for his taste.... another reason I'd cut down some of the baking powder and probably make sure I didn't skip the sifting step (which I did).

I think they'd be great with a cup of grated cheddar cheese to go with some soup. Mmmmm!


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