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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Collard greens are so wonderful.
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Collard greens are so wonderful.  This thread currently has 2,913 views. Print Print Thread
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Henriette Bsec
Thursday, April 12, 2007, 3:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,612
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Age: 42
What abot this - it wont let me write the gree letters
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/915968


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids

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Henriette_Bsec  -  Thursday, April 12, 2007, 3:20pm
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Mrs T O+
Thursday, April 12, 2007, 9:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Concealed Carry Gatherer! SWAMI Explorer Blend
Kyosha Nim
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The second word was lahanides, which I think would mean 'cabbage style' or 'like cabbage' .....  I don't recognize the first word.
Lahano is cabbage (singular) lahana (plural)
My, aren't we some Greek scholars here!!??

It still tastes good.

Sea Salt & Light,
Mrs "T"    O+


Interested in nutrition, lactation, religion, politics; love to be around people; talkative, sensitive, goofy; a "fishy Christian" ><>; left-handed; lived on a farm, small town & big city; love BTD/GTD; A staunch La Leche League veteran; b. 10/1947 Check BTD/GTD on facebook!
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ion
Friday, April 13, 2007, 7:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 730
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Location: Athens, Greece
Hi Henriette. Grate contact with languishes.
The last site may get me somewhere. All of them are very interesting. thanks a lot.

Mrs 0+ thank you too. I am sure soon i'll come up with a result.
I bet they do taste good.
kalimera kai efxaristo


PEACE
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Henriette Bsec
Saturday, April 14, 2007, 6:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamied nomad chameleon receptor worldview
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 8,612
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Location: Denmark
Age: 42
You are welcome .
Never seen them here in Denmark- we do mostly curly  kale in winter...


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
0 rh- secr ( Hunter or Explorer )
Diamonds, superfoods, Neutral,*black dots, avoids
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Possum
Monday, January 30, 2012, 1:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
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So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me...
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gulfcoastguy
Monday, January 30, 2012, 1:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Possum
So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me...


Here is a link from a seed company. When I went GTD I lost collards but I used to like to plant the Green Glaze variety.

http://www.southernexposure.com/greens-collards-c-3_30_100.html
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Possum
Monday, January 30, 2012, 2:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Thanks GCG but they only list greens?! I am also wondering re them being from the brassica family?!
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Possum
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
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Just did a search on the Main Forum Page under Eat Right & it seems there is not only no name for these in NZ/Australia, but they can't even be bought? Any more opinions from people "downunder" on here?
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Chloe
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:11am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Possum
So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me...


Here's an image page for collard...Perhaps something will look familiar to you

http://www.google.com/search?q.....iw=1780&bih=1064



"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Spring
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Chloe


Here's an image page for collard...Perhaps something will look familiar to you
http://www.google.com/search?q.....iw=1780&bih=1064

Those cooked ones are a bit much to take unless you are already hooked on these things - which I most certainly am! They are addictive!! And I'm serious. If my oldest son and a friend from New York could get addicted, I think anyone could eventually.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Possum
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
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Thanks but no nothing like that here
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Spring
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:33am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Possum
Thanks but no nothing like that here


I wonder if you could import the seed. A lot of these greens can be grown in large pots. They are easy to grow - similar to growing grass! The young, tender plants are sooo good! And even the "flowers" are delicious! The best part in my opinion.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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ABJoe
Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from Possum
It seems there is not only no name for these(collard greens) in NZ/Australia, but they can't even be bought? Any more opinions from people "downunder" on here?

By looking in Wikipedia, I found this is the family, etc. for Collard greens:
Brassica oleracea Acephala Group – kale and collard greens - Acephala means "headless".

I just looked at this seed com. website in NZ:
http://www.egmontseedsshop.co.nz/prestashop/

I searched through the vegetable listings for leafy cabbage plants and found:
Borecole and Kailaan which are both headless plant in the Brassica oleracea family.  These are the closest this company has to collard greens...

Komatsuma, Misome, and Tatsoi are headless Brassica campestris (according to the Egmont site) which are other headless cabbage family plants.

I would try to find some of these as substitutes for collard greens.  If all else fails, at least you have a source for seed.   


RH-, ISTJ
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Possum
Monday, January 30, 2012, 5:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Thanks ABJoe
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StarPine
Monday, January 30, 2012, 5:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I use them as a wrap instead of a tortilla and I also blend them raw with mango
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san j
Monday, January 30, 2012, 6:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Whole Foods Market used to feature a Collard Slaw at its salad bar.


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Brighid45
Monday, January 30, 2012, 11:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
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StarPine, I do the same thing using collard leaves as wraps. Cook them until they're pliable and soft but not too soft, then fill them with anything you can think of. My favorite: browned ground lamb/turkey/lean beef and grilled vegetables or caramelized onions with some hot sauce. So good!


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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grey rabbit
Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 1:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

swamix 47% Teacher-INFP
Kyosha Nim
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Just skimmed this thread. I'm surprised so many people boil them for so long! I saute them for about 5 minutes max. They have become my new fav. since they are cheaper than swiss chard and not as bitter. Just had some in some turkey soup, yum.


“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

John Wayne's last words
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Possum
Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 3:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Waahh & I can't get any
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StarPine
Thursday, February 2, 2012, 11:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Brighid45
StarPine, I do the same thing using collard leaves as wraps. Cook them until they're pliable and soft but not too soft, then fill them with anything you can think of. My favorite: browned ground lamb/turkey/lean beef and grilled vegetables or caramelized onions with some hot sauce. So good!


Wow that sounds good, except for the lamb part...
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O in Virginia
Friday, February 3, 2012, 1:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami
Kyosha Nim
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I have childhood memories of stinky horrible collard greens, but I just bought a bunch at Whole Foods because they are a diamond.  I thought I'd try them in turkey broth for soup.  I love to eat my greens in soups.  I hope they aren't stinky and gross.  I'm sure they'll be great with fresh ginger & onion, etc. and not cooked to death.
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Spring
Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:13am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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You'll be addicted in no time, O in V!  


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Drea
Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:58am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Collards are one my most favorite greens; and they are also the least expensive, even organic. The trick (in my opinion) is to slice them in very thin ribbons and saute them in a bit of (olive) oil just until bright green and slightly softened. Not slimy, just delicious.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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StarPine
Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I also read where you can make sauerkraut using collards instead of cabbage.

I wish someone would sell it! I want to try it but don't want to make it.
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