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Slow cooked collards  This thread currently has 601 views. Print Print Thread
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BuzyBee
Thursday, March 15, 2007, 5:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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There was a thread a few months back on cooking collards in the crock pot. I have been searching trying to find it but no luck yet. Anyway if anyone has a good recipe for cooking collards in a crock pot with a good seasoning  please share. I remember someone posted how they cook the collards in the crock pot and added turkey to cook along with the collards that sounded really good. I  want to try this but would like all the details before starting.
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Brighid45
Thursday, March 15, 2007, 7:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I don't remember the recipe, but have made collards with beef in the slow cooker and it was really easy, so turkey or chicken should be too.

Here's what I do: wash the collards, cut them into one-inch wide ribbons and place in the slow cooker. Add in some stock (turkey or vegetable stock is fine) or water, just enough to cover the bottom of the slow cooker to about half an inch. You can add other vegetables at this point if you like--onions, carrots, sweet potatoes, garlic, etc. Then I add in a little olive oil or some melted ghee--just a teaspoon or so. This is not strictly necessary, but I think it adds to the flavor and helps the rendered fat from the meat make the collards soft and easy to digest. Put in the meat you want to braise, season to taste, and cover. I'd cook turkey or chicken for 4-6 hours on the LOW setting. (Beef pot roasts can go on LOW for 6-8 hours, depending on the size and cut.)

Hope this helps. Maybe someone else will post the original recipe.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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BuzyBee
Thursday, March 15, 2007, 8:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for sharing. This is very helpful. I am craving some home cooked veggies and this will do the trick. I love collards but just can't seem to pull off the proper cooking method. I'm going to keep trying until I get it right. I won't quit! I won't quit! I won't quit!
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Brighid45
Thursday, March 15, 2007, 8:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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You can cook collards by themselves too. I'd say just add a little fat to the cooking water (like ghee or olive oil) and simmer for at least an hour on the stovetop. They can also be made with the slow cooker method as described above, just omit the meat. Maybe Gulfcoastguy or MoDon will weigh in here with their recipes. For collards, the longer you cook them the better they are, and the pot liquor tastes better too.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison

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Brighid45  -  Thursday, March 15, 2007, 8:26pm
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ABJoe
Friday, March 16, 2007, 3:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I think you've done a great job Brighid...  Some people like their collards cooked less, some more...  I usually cook them in plain water and add the ghee to them when I serve them...  I may need to try adding the ghee while cooking.


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Drea
Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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I enjoy them more when they are cooked in ghee on the stove top for not more than 5-8 minutes. The trick for me is to remove the tough stems before cooking, and to slice them as thin as possible.


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Brighid45
Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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*nod* Some people like them cooked a long time, some people don't. I think it's a matter of experimentation. The only warning I would add is that collards and kale need to be thoroughly cooked and not eaten raw or lightly steamed, or they will interfere with the proper functioning of your thyroid. I didn't understand this at first, but the wise words of several people here on the board convinced me Slicing the greens thinly as Drea does is a good way to help them cook faster and still get the thorough cooking they need.

Experiment and see what you like! And if you come up with a great recipe, please share it here, we'd all love to try new ways of cooking good food!


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Peppermint Twist
Friday, March 16, 2007, 5:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Interesting, as sometimes I accidentally undercook my kale and I tell myself it is better for me that way, as that way any heat-sensitive nutrients are not cooked out at all, but you have given food for thought re the thyroid thing.

I recently bought some bags of frozen, chopped collard greens at Publix supermarket (they have their own brand of this--yay).  Previously, I've only ever cooked fresh collard greens.  I no longer have my crock pot (long story), but do you think I could just as easily slow-cook 'em in the oven on a low temp, with some meat, other veggies and liquid in the pot?

I was thinking maybe:

- 1 bag of frozen collards (not bothering to defrost 'em, as the additional liquid will be good as they good)

- 1 sliced large purple onion

- water or organic broth/stock, how much I'm not sure, but letting collards or kale dry out has proven not to be a good idea in my ad-hoc "recipes" *lol*, so I'd probably put a good bit of liquid in.

- turkey (that sounds good!), including neck so that we get some nice calcium cooking into the broth/"pot liquor", as Brig so aptly put it.  I like that phrase!

- 1 cut up sweet potato or other root veggie

For seasoning, I'd probably use some organic poultry seasoning, sea salt, and garlic...no?  Yes?  Other thoughts?

Brig, what temp should I cook this lot in, if I have it in, say, a covered Pyrex casserole dish?  And for how long?  Maybe cook it at around 335 for about...how long?  Inquiring minds want to know!


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jayney-O
Friday, March 16, 2007, 5:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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don't forget to use some fat. like ghee....unless your meat would have plenty...
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, March 16, 2007, 6:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ooooh, fat.  Need it, love it, gotta have it.


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gulfcoastguy
Friday, March 16, 2007, 7:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Okay normally I cut the collards into ribbons like Bridgid. First I cook some onion in a frying pan with olive oil and salt, then I add the collards and wilt them down, add a little vinegar usually champagne vinegar or pepper vinegar but apple cider vinegar could work. Cover and let steam a while. Whole cooking time less than 20 to 30 minutes. I know vinegar is a no for A's but another nonBTD A I know adds some fresh ginger and a little water instead of vinegar. I never cook them in a crockpot myself as by the time I brown the onion I am halfway there anyway.
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Brighid45
Friday, March 16, 2007, 8:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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PT--that oven temp (325-335F) should work just fine. Throw in some ghee, it really does add to the flavor and soften up the greens a bit. Olive oil is okay too, but I like ghee better Sounds good to me!

GCG--I usually do my greens on the stovetop too, but there are some days when I know my energy levels will be pretty low, so the slow cooker does my work for me Both ways are delicious imo. I love cutting the collards chiffonade (ribbon style). For some reason they just taste better that way, I'm sure that's just psychological *chuckle*


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Drea
Saturday, March 17, 2007, 5:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Brighid45
The only warning I would add is that collards and kale need to be thoroughly cooked and not eaten raw or lightly steamed, or they will interfere with the proper functioning of your thyroid.


When you say that uncooked collards and kale interfere with the proper functioning of the thyroid, what symptoms does this manifest? I eat about half of my kale consumption raw, half cooked. How can I tell when they are thoroughly cooked?


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BuzyBee
Monday, March 19, 2007, 5:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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If you cook your collards in the crockpot does anyone know if you need to boil them first or do you just throw everything in the crockpot and let her go.
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