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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  How To Make Walnut Butter?
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How To Make Walnut Butter?  This thread currently has 1,090 views. Print Print Thread
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Tina
Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 10:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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How do I make walnut butter with soaked nuts?  Do I dehydrate them to crispy again before making?  

I don't know if they will get oily enough to make butter after they have been soaked and dehydrated.  Anyone do it this way?  

Plus, are the nuts still full of the good fats and oils after being soaked and dehydrated?  Just wondering....

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Lola
Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 10:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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yes, I make it that way....just make sure the nuts are totally dry......
you need to add some extra oil to get the consistency you want......ghee is also nice.

toasting them before you grind them into flour gives it a stronger taste......both ways are fine.


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Tina
Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 10:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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What other kind of oil can I use?  Wouldn't olive be too strong?

 I went to get butter to make ghee and they didn't have organic unsalted, cultured butter.  That is what I wanted!  Ugh.  Small town life...

Also, how long will it store in the frig?


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Drea
Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 11:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Try walnut oil


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Lola
Wednesday, February 7, 2007, 11:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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make small batches.....


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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italybound
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 12:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from outdoordrea
Try walnut oil


yep, that's what I use whether I'm making walnut or almond butter. Turns out very nicely. They also have hazelnut oil, if it's not an avoid for you.



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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 7:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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ooo weeew I'll give a try too
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Henriette Bsec
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 9:58am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Tina

 I went to get butter to make ghee and they didn't have organic unsalted, cultured butter.  That is what I wanted!  Ugh.  Small town life...


Tina you can use salted and cultured butter to make ghee
I can´t get anything else her ...... and it works fine for me.

I prefer to use walnut oil to my nutbutter or macadamianut oil.


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Alia Vo
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 5:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Any soaked nuts/seeds can be made into nut/seed butter; make sure the nuts /seeds are completely dry by using a dehydrator, an oven, or air drying.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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Carol the Dabbler
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 6:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I don't use any oil or added fat when I make almond-walnut butter.  I don't worry about getting the walnuts completely pureed, just ground up as well as my food processor will do, which is pretty well but not real smooth.  Then I mix it half and half with store-bought raw almond butter.  The almond butter is almost runny right out of the jar, and the walnut "butter" is pretty stiff, so the mixture is nice and spreadable.  (If I had a larger food processor, I might try putting the almond butter in there with the walnuts, and see if things turn out smoother than way.)

I got this idea from someone else's posts a few months ago -- Victoria, was that you?

I use raw organic walnuts straight from the bag.  I've thought about soaking them first, and see no reason why they wouldn't work at least as well that way.

I find that two cups of (unsoaked) walnut halves (enough to fill my processor bowl) grinds down to one cup of "butter," so I mix it with one cup of almond butter (without bothering to re-measure the walnuts after grinding).  I put the mix in an old almond-butter jar (with the label removed so I can tell the difference) and store it in the fridge.

This is about the only way I use almond butter any more -- except when I'm too lazy to grind up some walnuts.



Carol

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Carol_the_Dabbler  -  Thursday, February 8, 2007, 6:08pm
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Alia Vo
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 6:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Thank you for sharing your almond-walnut butter concoction with us, Carol the Dabbler.

Alia


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Victoria
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 6:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Carol_the_Dabbler

I don't use any oil or added fat when I make almond-walnut butter.  I don't worry about getting the walnuts completely pureed, just ground up as well as my food processor will do, which is pretty well but not real smooth.  Then I mix it half and half with store-bought raw almond butter.  The almond butter is almost runny right out of the jar, and the walnut "butter" is pretty stiff, so the mixture is nice and spreadable.  (If I had a larger food processor, I might try putting the almond butter in there with the walnuts, and see if things turn out smoother than way.)

I got this idea from someone else's posts a few months ago -- Victoria, was that you?



Hi Carol!  
It was probably me, although I don't make my walnuts into walnut butter.  I enjoy chopped walnuts more and find them less bitter than the walnut butter.  So I use almond butter as you do, and also find it to be very runny.  Adding 1/2 and 1/2 finely chopped walnuts makes a very crunchy almond butter which is the right consistency to be spreadable.



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ISA-MANUELA
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 8:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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so do you use real butter to create that or is it just ghee and nuts in or almonds or even both never did that, I am just buying *peanutbutter* but here cold pressed palmoil is used as a basic
and sooo yummi ....
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Carol the Dabbler
Thursday, February 8, 2007, 9:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Isa, if I understand your question, the term "nut butter" here in the U.S.A. means just nuts ground into a paste, sometimes with oil added to make the grinding easier.  It has nothing to do with dairy butter except that it's a smooth substance that you can spread on bread.  Of course, you could use butter or ghee as the "oil" when you make nut butter, as several people have mentioned in this thread.

I used to use palm oil for "greasing" my bread pans, but have stopped because it hasn't been rated for the BTD.  In fact, my best guess is that when it is tested, it will turn out about the same as coconut oil, i.e., an Avoid for just about everybody.


Quoted from Victoria
Hi Carol!  
It was probably me, although I don't make my walnuts into walnut butter.  I enjoy chopped walnuts more and find them less bitter than the walnut butter.  So I use almond butter as you do, and also find it to be very runny.  Adding 1/2 and 1/2 finely chopped walnuts makes a very crunchy almond butter which is the right consistency to be spreadable.



Hi, Victoria!  Yes, that's what I remember you saying -- but I wasn't sure what you meant by "finely chopped" so I just Did It Myyyyyy Way!

I don't find the food-processed walnuts to be bitter, at least not any more so that the slight bitter edge that any walnut has (I think it's in the skin).  And the almond butter is very sweet, so the combination is really good.  Oh, boy, gotta go make some right now!!!



Carol

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ISA-MANUELA
Friday, February 9, 2007, 6:47am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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thanx C.th.D so just the nuts & something in to be able to get it onto the bread ,

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Carol_the_Dabbler  -  Friday, February 9, 2007, 6:48am
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Brighid45
Friday, February 9, 2007, 5:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I tried mixing storebought almond butter with ground walnuts and ghee as Victoria and Carol mentioned in their posts . . . it came out absolutely delicious, smooth and a nice mix of flavors. It makes a wonderful substitute for peanut butter toast, if you liked that treat in the past and can't have peanuts. Very rich though, a little goes a long way!


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Lisalea
Sunday, February 18, 2007, 6:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Has anybody tried making frozen desserts with lets say almond butter and chopped up walnuts ??
Just a thought ... how did it turn out ?
TY


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linnsmama
Sunday, February 18, 2007, 6:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Tina
What other kind of oil can I use?  Wouldn't olive be too strong?



I have found that the trendy "extra-light tasting" olive oil is wonderful, although I haven't found it organic yet.  Check for it in your small town - they might have it where they wouldn't have more exotic stuff like walnut oil.  I can use the extra-light olive oil in baking and anywhere I used to use canola oil without getting an olive flavor.  The one thing to beware of though is that you don't get an olive oil blend, where they water it down with soy oil.

I still keep a bottle of good old extra-virgin organic olive oil to drench the rest of my food in.  Mmmmmmm.  Slurp slurp slurp.  (Okay, maybe not drench, but you O's know what I mean!)

Robin
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Brighid45
Sunday, February 18, 2007, 7:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Linnsmama--I use the light olive oil in baking and anywhere I don't want a strong olive taste too. It's perfect for making nut butters


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Carol the Dabbler
Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 7:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from LISALEA
Has anybody tried making frozen desserts with lets say almond butter and chopped up walnuts ??
Just a thought ... how did it turn out ?



Well, I haven't tried anything frozen, but I have made "peanut butter" cookies with that very combination, and they were yummy!


By the way, I don't think I described the texture of my ground-up walnuts very well before.  It's sort of doughy, like marzipan.  (Of course, I don't add any oil.)  But mixing it half-and-half with store-bought almond butter gives a very tasty, spreadable result.



Carol

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