Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Kale and Collard
Users Browsing Forum
Yahoo! Bot and 4 Guests

Kale and Collard  This thread currently has 3,427 views. Print Print Thread
4 Pages 1 2 3 4 All Recommend Thread
Laura P
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
These are two veggies I love but for the life of me can not get them cooked well enough for them to be digestable to me, any ideas????



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message
Schluggell
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 8:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Permaculture Rh+ INFP Aquarius
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,035
Gender: Male
Location: Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
Age: 45
Quoted from lkpetrolino
..cooked well enough for them to be digestable to me...


Digestible??? How do you mean?

Personally I like them raw better than cooked - fresh from the garden in late Fall is far better than any store-bought {intexture and taste}. At least Kale anyways is a source of fresh salad greens when there is snow on the ground.

Trimming off the stem/midrib can help.

Also besides cooking, try a sort of "Antipasti" with them by marinating beforehand - sort of a Vinaigrette-Slaw.


Herr Schlüggell -- Establish a Garden; Cultivate Community. "To see things in the seed, that is genius. He who obtains has little. He who scatters has much. The way to do is to be." -Lao Tzu
Bruno Manser, Ned Lud, August Sabbe, Richard St. Barbe-Baker, Eddie Koiki Mabo, Masanobu Fukuoka

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Thursday, December 7, 2006, 8:38am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 81
Brighid45
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 11:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

INFJ
Kyosha Nim
Columnist and Bloggers
Posts: 5,193
Gender: Female
Location: southeastern Pennsylvania
Age: 56
Schluggell's suggestion of removing the ribs and stem is a good one, as they naturally tend to be tough. I would also suggest using the smaller more tender leaves.

I find collards are more digestible if you blanch the leaves first before cooking them. I dip the leaves in boiling water for about 10-20 seconds, then cook them as desired. Yes, you do lose some nutrients this way, but there's always a tradeoff. I'd rather lose a few vitamins than constantly battle heartburn or indigestion. Kale can also be treated this way.

I've also found that using some olive oil to saute the greens, or put in their cooking water, goes a long way toward making them easier to digest. A combination of olive oil and ghee works well too. You don't need much--just a tablespoon or so. When I make kale in the morning for breakfast, I saute the blanched dried greens for about 2 minutes in olive oil, stirring to make sure all the leaves are coated; then I cover the pan and let the greens steam and wilt for about 2 more minutes, maybe a little longer.

Hope this helps


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 81
Whimsical
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 1:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

HUNTER Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 1,213
Gender: Female
Location: Toronto, Canada
Age: 34
I have a friend who blends up a banana and some kale every morning for breakfast - so maybe choose an A-compliant fruit (or fruits) and trying drinking them?  


MIFHI E-185
Naturopathic Doctor in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 81
Schluggell
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 1:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Permaculture Rh+ INFP Aquarius
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,035
Gender: Male
Location: Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
Age: 45
Sounds almost Hawai'ian: A 'Kalanana' Smoothie Pleaz...a healthy change from Green Beer on St. Paddys to boot.


Herr Schlüggell -- Establish a Garden; Cultivate Community. "To see things in the seed, that is genius. He who obtains has little. He who scatters has much. The way to do is to be." -Lao Tzu
Bruno Manser, Ned Lud, August Sabbe, Richard St. Barbe-Baker, Eddie Koiki Mabo, Masanobu Fukuoka
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 4 - 81
Vicki
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 1:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Using Custom SWAMI Food List
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 3,852
Long cooking times improve the body's access to calcium in greens?
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 5 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 1:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
I love to eat them as well but struggle in cooking them to turn out the right way. The little bit I do know is that they require just a little bit of water, cook slow and long, and season as desired. Mine always turn out tough, chewy, and not done. But anywhere I go and there are cooked collards or kale I load my plate up and enjoy.

I think you should just keep trying different ways and don't give up. If one way fails or does not turn out the way you like it, try something different.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 81
apositive
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 2:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~ teacher ~ probably nonnie
Ee Dan
Ee Dan
Posts: 671
Gender: Female
Location: New England
Age: 59
While I do have very young kale leaves raw in salad, I agree with Vicki that longer cooking time helps make nutrients more accessible.  Elsewhere I have heard it recommended that kale and collards be cooked to the point that their green color becomes that dull color that would indicate, with many other vegetables, that they are overcooked - but not for these guys.


INTJ
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 81
Don
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 2:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
I usually cook 3-4 quarts (finished amount) of collard greens every week. I love them and have a huge serving of them for breakfast basically everyday.

I agree 100% that by cooking collard greens longer they become much better tasting. In fact, after a long enough time so that when even the biggest pieces of the rib/stem are completely tender the collards will taste sweet.

I buy very large bunches of collard greens at a local HFS. I only buy bunched collard greens. I won't buy them chopped up and bagged or bundles of the leaves that have already been pulled off of the main stalk. I figure they will be fresher and more nutritious with the leaves still on the stalk, especially because I cook all of the ribs/stems all the way down to where they attach to the main stalk.

I do not add anything other than water to the pot. I used to, but have found they taste better when cooked totally plain. I do eat them with olive oil.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 8 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 2:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
MoDon, how long do you cook them?. What is a long time, hour, couple of hours, etc.  I think this is my problem in cooking them.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 81
Don
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 3:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
The short answer is I really have no idea how long I cook my collard greens, but yes it could be a couple of hours or maybe longer.

Here is the long answer. I have an 8 quart pot. I put it on the stove when it is full of cut up collard greens and usually add about 1 1/2 cups of cups of water and turn the electric burner on to med-high. Then I go back to cutting up the rest of the collard greens. Usually the collards in the pot are cooked down enough for me to keep adding additional plates full of cut up collards as I progress until I am done cutting up the whole bundle. I really don't know how long this process takes, but if it was a really big bunch it can take awhile.

Once I have added all the collards to the pot I will turn the stove down to med-low until all the collards have cooked down and are dull green. I will then turn the stove down to somewhere between the lowest setting possible and one notch above that. I will then set the timer for 20 minutes at a time to remind me to go back and check the water level (I don't want to let them run dry!) and stir them. I will keep doing this for several times finally starting to check a bite of rib/stem for tenderness and taste each time.

I am never in a rush to turn the stove off. I will sometimes leave them cooking until late in the evening finally turning them off so they will have a little time to cool somewhat before I put them in the refrigerator for the night. Even when I do turn the stove off I leave the pot on the burner so they will keep "cooking" for a while longer.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Thursday, December 7, 2006, 4:27pm
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 10 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 4:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Thanks for the info. I will practice with this until I get it right. Sooner or Later I will have home cooked collards that are cooked done and taste good.

I really do appreciate the step by step process. I like it when someone gives me instructions that are clear and easy to follow.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
I think Don probably cooks his collards about 5 times longer than anyone else I know!  And that's probably why he is able to eat so much of them without problems.  In our present era, we are so accustomed to lightly steaming vegetables to be 'al dente'.  This may work with broccoli, but the big leaf greens are a different thing altogether.  But keep in mind that with all that cooking, there are a lot of the nutrients left in the cooking water.  It needs to be eaten also.

This is the way they were cooked in the Appalachian Mountains where I grew up.  A BIG pot of greens was put on the stove, and literally cooked for hours.  They always tasted good.  I think the only seasonings ever used were salt, oil, and sometimes a piece of pork fat!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 81
Drea
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENFJ
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 11,623
Gender: Female
Location: Northern New Mexico
Age: 52
Collards are also good added to bean soups (the ones that need to be cooked for hours on the stove). The nutrients go into the soup and the leaves get fully cooked.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
Logged Online
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 81
Don
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
Quoted from Victoria
But keep in mind that with all that cooking, there are a lot of the nutrients left in the cooking water.  It needs to be eaten also.

The the liquid at the bottom is commonly called potlicker and is delicious. I wouldn't waste a drop of it.  


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 14 - 81
Colleen
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Organic soap maker cleaning world 1 bubble @ time
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 341
Gender: Female
Location: Oakville, ON
MoDon, how long do these collards then last in your frig?


A New Sponge on the Block ... so much to learn.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 15 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Victoria, your post just brought up a thought of mine. Does any use the stainless steel waterless cookware. I have read articles about how when you cook with this cookware system the nutrients stay in the food rather than cook out of the food. It is suppose to be a healthier way of cooking. Little pricey but has lifetime warrrenty so you should never have to buy but one set.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 16 - 81
Don
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
After they have cooled, usually the next morning, I put the collards in 1 qt. plastic freezer boxes and put them in the freezer. I take them out as needed.

How often I need to cook up a batch, which is usually 3-4 quarts, depends on a variety of other things such as how many other types of greens I have during that time. I probably cook a batch 2-4 times a months.

I can't always get really good collard greens because the store I buy them at restocks produce Monday night and usually runs out of collard greens before the following week, sometimes as early as sometime Thursday. Therefore, I try to make sure I always have several qt. containers in the freezer so that I won't run out.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 17 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Smart way of doing things. Sometimes when my mom cook collards she will freeze a container of them and bring them to me when she comes to visit. I get to enjoy them at my convience.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 18 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 5:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
BuzyBee,
Do you have a particular brand of cookware you are thinking about?  We have had threads in the past where we discussed cookware, so there are people around here with opinions about it!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 19 - 81
yaman
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 7:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; MN
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 2,768
Gender: Male
Location: Antigoni Island, Istanbul-Turkey
Age: 61
Quoted from BuzyBee
Victoria, your post just brought up a thought of mine. Does any use the stainless steel waterless cookware. I have read articles about how when you cook with this cookware system the nutrients stay in the food rather than cook out of the food. It is suppose to be a healthier way of cooking. Little pricey but has lifetime warrrenty so you should never have to buy but one set.


I have been using the same stainless waterless cookware for the last 20 years and they still look brand new. And yes, especially the vegetables taste great when cooked waterless.

Cheers,
Yaman


"You are never given a problem without the will power to solve it"
Richard Bach - Illusions, The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 20 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 7:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Quoted Text
Do you have a particular brand of cookware you are thinking about?  We have had threads in the past where we discussed cookware, so there are people around here with opinions about it!  


Not really. Just getting suggestions. I guess I could hunt some threads down on this subject and find some info on a good set of cookware. I would like to invest in a nice set. I use stainless steel right now and I think the brand is Wolf Gang Puck?? But I would really like to have a set of the waterless cookware. I think this would be an upgrade.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 21 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 7, 2006, 11:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Do you guys really mean waterless?  If you're cooking leafy greens, or broccoli, for example, do you add no water at all?  

I have a nice set of stainless cookware, but I still have to add water.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 22 - 81
BuzyBee
Friday, December 8, 2006, 1:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Quoted Text
Do you guys really mean waterless?  If you're cooking leafy greens, or broccoli, for example, do you add no water at all?  

I have a nice set of stainless cookware, but I still have to add water.


Regular SS you will need to add water. It is special WaterLess Cookware that needs no water(maybe just tablespoon). You can google waterless cookware and get several different brands. I was reading about a Healthy Gourmet set that looked top of the line. Most are 18/10 SS which is the best.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 23 - 81
zola
Friday, December 8, 2006, 1:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT4 - Explorer
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 487
Location: WA, USA
Age: 42
That's interesting that longer cooking for collards makes the calcium more accessible. When I was in North Carolina they told me to cook them over and hour! I was shocked. Back in the day the slaves used to eat them and it was a treat to get the 'liquor' in the bottom of the pot.


It is so pleasant to explore nature & oneself at the same time, doing violence neither to her nor to one's own spirit, but bringing both into balance in gentle, mutual interaction.

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 24 - 81
Victoria
Friday, December 8, 2006, 5:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
I'm going to look into that waterless cookware, B.B.  It sounds great!



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 25 - 81
jayney-O
Friday, December 8, 2006, 7:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
traditional  cooking  makes me suspect  that something was working...that there was a reason it was done that way, and not just to please the kids...tho now everyone says you shouldn't cook collards long...I wonder. There is a collard festival in east palo alto....I'm going to start a new thread to mention this.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 26 - 81
Alia Vo
Saturday, December 9, 2006, 1:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,640
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 43
Steaming collards or any vegetables in a food steamer produces tender and flavorful vegetables.  I like collards and kale cooked when they just turn bright green and are crisp--not overly done.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
A Positive Secretor
Minneapolis, Minnesota
BTD Lifestyle Since 1999
John 17

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Saturday, December 9, 2006, 1:58am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 27 - 81
halpics
Sunday, December 10, 2006, 3:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Thanks for the cooking info MoDon...I couldn't find your last post about it.. I grew collards for the fall and have been enjoying them the last few months... never realized how delicious the small ones were just raw... I tried your longer cooking with just water and they were so sweet tasting, just delicious!  Mom thought I had put sugar in them!
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 28 - 81
Victoria
Sunday, December 10, 2006, 3:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
I've been thinking about the cooking time for greens like collards.  Some of you have mentioned putting them into salads, stir frying and lightly steaming.  I remember when I was young and we had the collards and other greens that were so good, and cooked for hours.  Those were BIG plants, I mean, very mature greens . . . none of these little tender, fresh, new leaves.  There is no way we could have eaten those big tough leaves without long cooking.  I don't know why they were so big, but when I would bring them in from the garden, they were almost as big as me!  

Maybe that's the difference in long cooking vs. lightly steaming or raw.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 29 - 81
BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Has anyone tried cooking collards/kale/turnips in a crock pot. Since long slow cooking is needed I was just wondering if anyone had tried this and if so how did they turn out.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 30 - 81
Lola
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,428
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 58
excellent! )


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 31 - 81
BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
What kind of time are we looking at 4,6,8 hrs? I am assuming low temp.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 32 - 81
Lola
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:58am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,428
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 58
yes.....I leave them overnight. 8 hours and low temp......but also add meat and bones.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 33 - 81
BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 2:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
What kinda meat. Most people put pork but being that it is an avoid what is the best choice. Also since I like potatoes cut up and cooked in the greens and since that is a no- no how about rutabaga. They are very close to potatoe as far as taste and texture. In fact once I had rutabage in cabbage and did not know that it was not potatoe.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 34 - 81
Elizabeth
Monday, December 11, 2006, 4:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 360
I find that if I put two cloves of garlic in a lot of water, boil ten minutes, then add the kale or collards, it improves the dish.  To get stuff to cook quickly, after you wash them off, roll the leaves longwise and slice in thin ribbons (about 1/8 inch across), then pop in the boiling water.  It will take far less time, and cook "soft".  I have not timed it, however.  A smallish bunch of kale, cooked that way, will make two medium sized servings on a plate.  It all bunches together, like spaghetti, and one gets it down without a volume struggle.   Delicious, just fewer leftovers.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 35 - 81
Victoria
Monday, December 11, 2006, 5:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Lamb or beef, with lots of meaty bones.  Go with what's compatible with your bloodtype.  Even turkey with lots of bones would work.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 36 - 81
Alia Vo
Monday, December 11, 2006, 6:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,640
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 43
A small bunch of collards with relatively young and small leaves does not need alot of cooking time--regardless of cooking method.  I find these bunches to be sweet tasting, as well.  

I remember in years past seeing some very big collard bunches at a conventional grocery store and I purchased one bunch; I believe more 'mature' collard bunch would require a longer cooking time.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
A Positive Secretor
Minneapolis, Minnesota
BTD Lifestyle Since 1999
John 17
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 37 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 2:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Does anyone put duplins in their kale, collards, or turnips. They are made of flour. Not sure of the other ingredients. This is very popular in the south.


I mean Dumplings. Sorry for the misspelling. In response to Lola

Revision History (2 edits)
Schluggell  -  Thursday, December 14, 2006, 1:50pm
Schluggell  -  Thursday, December 14, 2006, 1:46pm
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 38 - 81
Lola
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 2:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,428
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 58
do you mean dumplings?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 39 - 81
jayney-O
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 7:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
that's a southern thing? Darn, that sounds so good....but hey, flour. wrong balance, better to go with meat.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 40 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 7:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
Which you may use corn mill for the dumplings. I will ask one of my friends about the ingredients in these.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 41 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Oh Yeah!  I was raised on Chickens and Dumplings, and how fine it was!!

(Of course, little did I know that I was steadily poisoning myself!)  My body let me in on that fact, a few years down the road.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 42 - 81
BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 495
Gender: Female
Location: NC
Age: 50
I am sure the recipe can be adjusted to meet the BTD. Mainly, flour(spelt), cornmeal, and water. If milk is needed use soy, almond, or rice.

I believe they are made like cornbread but boiled in with greens instead of baked or fried.

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:19pm
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 43 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
It's basically a biscuit type dough, shaped into little balls and boiled in chicken broth, with plenty of shredded meat also in the broth.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 44 - 81
Laura P
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
If you really wanted dumplings you could make them out of nutflour

Let's do this if someone makes collards and says hey, this is great! post what you did here, like MoDon did



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 45 - 81
geminisue
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMIED Rh+ G2-Gatherer
Sam Dan
Posts: 2,763
Gender: Female
Location: GOTL, Ohio, U.S.A.
Age: 69
Laura is nut flour the same thing as i.e. almond meal ? Do you use it the same as flour? Thanks!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 46 - 81
Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 10:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Almond meal is nut flour.  It has no gluten, so take that into account if you are baking with it.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 47 - 81
jayney-O
Friday, December 15, 2006, 5:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I really don't think it would make a very good dumpling, dumplings being soft and light at best, heavy and dense, not good .....I don't suggest the nut flour. (hope I'm not dashing anybody's hopes....I'd go with a compliant flour) (apologies to Laura P)

Revision History (2 edits)
Schluggell  -  Friday, December 15, 2006, 5:50pm
Schluggell  -  Friday, December 15, 2006, 5:49pm
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 48 - 81
OSuzanna
Saturday, December 16, 2006, 2:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,618
Gender: Female
Location: Rhode Island
Age: 60
How 'bout just not calling them dumplings, so the expectations won't be there....

Thanks for the thread, guys, I've been thinking about adding collards &/or kale to our diet, but hesitating out of fear & ignorance!

BTW, can I be just completely opinionated? The "waterless" cookware just sounds gimmicky to me, vegetable water has so many uses. I'm not saying it's not a clever way of cooking, just missing the pleasures of broth. Otherwise, I'm sticking to my stainless steel no-special-care, no-fuss cookware.

Look forward to trying above-mentioned recipes & cooking hints!


OSuzanna
A Before Picture , In the Process of Becoming an After Picture
FOOD for THOUGHT, Super Beneficial 4 All Blood Types!

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Saturday, December 16, 2006, 3:04am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 49 - 81
Laura P
Saturday, December 16, 2006, 1:20pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,206
Gender: Female
Location: Charleston, SC
Age: 33
So just cooked some turkey soup last night and put a bunch of collard ribbons in it at the begining of cooking.  This gave them a wonderful taste and a tender texture!



If there is no God, who pops up the next Kleenex?
Art Hoppe


Sometimes you don't know how great life is until you lose what you didn't know you had
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 50 - 81
Victoria
Saturday, December 16, 2006, 6:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
I've been adding collards to the morning vegetable juice that I make with my Omega 8003.  Just one big leaf per pint of juice.  Sometimes I use Kale instead, but never both or it would be too strong.

The base is carrot, celery, beet, parsnip, parsley, wheat grass, fennel bulb and ginger root.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 51 - 81
RhodaMaria
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Okay I just had my dinner...    

Guess what I had fresh kale (cooked for 10 minutes) and cannelini beans (out of a glass container and heated), mashed up together with some Herbamare salts in it and when mashed up added the baked cubes of turkey with 4 cloves of garlic in it..

This was A W E S O M E!!!! I had a a nica glass of red wine going with it..

This recipe will feature my future recipebook...

My clients need recipes, esp. the nonnies... So... I am compiling recipes  
8 different databases for my A,B, AB and O's and NONNIES...  

By my future partner in business   Jolanda, an O nonnie, claims that I am an expert on  cooking..      She is looking for entrepreneurs to start a BTD restaurant.. Isn't she awesome???
Okay guys and gals, when this BTD oriented Cuisine will open, I will let you know...

I am afraid these databases are in Dutch...    

I just love kale....  

Cocky  

Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:39pm
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 52 - 81
Lola
Sunday, December 17, 2006, 6:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,428
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 58
that s a wonderful project, Cocky!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 53 - 81
mmdoppel
Wednesday, December 20, 2006, 8:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from ironwood55

The the liquid at the bottom is commonly called potlicker and is delicious. I wouldn't waste a drop of it.  


Hi All,

I am a newbie on the BTD and a new cook as well. Last night I made Kale then added brown rice to soak up the leftover liquid. It came out great. Just another idea for Kale.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 54 - 81
Victoria
Wednesday, December 20, 2006, 8:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Welcome to the BTD, Melissa, and to the Forum!  

Was that pre-cooked rice that you added to your kale?



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 55 - 81
mmdoppel
Wednesday, December 20, 2006, 8:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Um... dont laugh! I am not sure. The directions said to cook for about 10-15 minutes. Maybe it was instant? Uncle Bens I believe.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 56 - 81
Victoria
Wednesday, December 20, 2006, 10:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Quoted from mmdoppel
Um... dont laugh! I am not sure. The directions said to cook for about 10-15 minutes. Maybe it was instant? Uncle Bens I believe.


If I laugh, it will only be with you, and not at you!    Keep eatin' that kale!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 57 - 81
funkymuse
Friday, December 22, 2006, 1:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I've been trying to work with Kale for two years and just recently gave up and am relying on Spinich and Romaine for my deep greens.  

I have been cooking the kale in olive oil and onions and letting it cook down until it's soft.  Sometimes it's somewhat platable other times, I can't stand it and throw the whole pot out.

Any suggestions on Kale would be appreciated!  

And what do collard greens taste like?  I've never tried them.  From what I've read here, they are worth a shot!  Are they good for O's?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 58 - 81
Elizabeth
Friday, December 22, 2006, 2:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 360
Collards are good, a stronger version of kale maybe?  Don't give up on kale.  First, roll the leaves longway and cut the roll into very thin ribbons (about 1/8 of an inch across).  You will have pretty green "spaghetti."  Meanwhile, peel two garlic cloves and cook in a big pot of water.  After about ten minutes, they will be soft.  Now dump in the green ribbons.  It should take about 15-20 minutes.  Check for softness.  At the end, add a little olive oil, and a sprinkle of salt.  That liquid is good to drink, but you need to drain the kale.  It's all the same ingredients, but cutting it finely and using garlic helps the taste and presentation a lot.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 59 - 81
chaton94
Friday, December 22, 2006, 6:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Hello, Can you say to me if the photographs of the cabbage Collard, Kale and others are correspond; in France one does not find too many of these cabbages ! dommage because they are beneficial!

To see the photographs of cabbages, click  here


Revision History (3 edits)
Schluggell  -  Friday, December 22, 2006, 6:39pm
Schluggell  -  Friday, December 22, 2006, 6:38pm
Schluggell  -  Friday, December 22, 2006, 6:38pm
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 60 - 81
Victoria
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 4:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Those photos of cabbage, red cabbage, kale and collards look just the same as the ones we have here.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 61 - 81
chaton94
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 9:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User

Thank you, because how we do not have these kinds of cabbages in France one did not know what a cabbages spoke Mr D' Adamo!
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 62 - 81
ISA-MANUELA
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 12:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
suuuuuuppeeer tous ces photos !!! wow just great....if only I could stand the taste or smell ....ykes.....thanx for sharing chaton94
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 63 - 81
Victoria
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 6:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 15,436
Gender: Female
Location: Oregon
Do you have any dark green leafy veggies that you can buy?



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 64 - 81
chaton94
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 6:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Excuse me i don't see or understand what  are veggies?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 65 - 81
shoulderblade
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 6:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh -
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,094
Gender: Male
Location: Kitchener, ON.
Age: 65
Quoted from chaton94
Excuse me i don't see or understand what  are veggies?


'Veggies' = short name for 'vegetables'.






Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 66 - 81
chaton94
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 6:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I believe that no

Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 67 - 81
koahiatamadl
Saturday, December 23, 2006, 8:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Hunter ISTJ
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 568
Gender: Female
Location: Basel, CH
Age: 37
How about spinach, rocket, broccoli?  Certain kinds of lettuce also are classed as green leafy beneficials...
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 68 - 81
chaton94
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 7:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Hello koahiatamadl, I do not have to classify lettuces because I believe that they all are beneficial or neutral while for cabbages, that can give confusions!

thus we have spinach, brocoli,rocket...

I can even go to "ceuillir " my lettuce bio at my grandfather, he  has a kitchen garden!



Revision History (1 edits)
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 7:44am
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 69 - 81
Don
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 3:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
Quoted from chaton94
I do not have to classify lettuces because I believe that they all are beneficial or neutral ...

It is not only important to not eat the avoid rated foods, but it is also important to eat lots of beneficial foods too. Therefore, it would be good if you can distinguish between beneficial lettuces, cabbages, etc.



FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 70 - 81
linnsmama
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 3:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from Elizabeth
Don't give up on kale.  First, roll the leaves longway and cut the roll into very thin ribbons (about 1/8 of an inch across).  You will have pretty green "spaghetti."


Also, cut the stems out before you roll up the leaves.  I usually eat kale raw, which may not be good for those with digestive difficulty.  As an O, I'm lucky to have that iron stomach.

I think I've posted this one before but after a year of eating it, I am still in love with this raw kale recipe:

Almond Kale Slaw
The dressing:
1/3 cup almond butter
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tsp ground ginger
½ 4oz can chopped green chilis
2 tsp soy sauce or fish sauce
1/3 cup mayonnaise
The Salad:
1 bunch of kale, rinsed, stems cut out and leaves sliced into ribbons
1 large carrot, peeled and shredded
½  cup shredded red cabbage
¼ cup sliced almonds
Mix salad and dressing together.  Serve and enjoy!

I think I love this as much as MoDon loves his collards!

Robin
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 71 - 81
funkymuse
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 3:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I didn't think O's were supposed to eat cabbage?
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 72 - 81
chaton94
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 5:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Don 't  worry Modon and thanks  for the answer, I have 3 books of Mr D'Adamo at home and I eat only beneficial food sometimes neutral and to very seldom prevent when I 'm not at home. But I had evil to distinguish all cabbages quoted by Adamo, then I made research and found photographs for each cabbages. So, when I go to supermarket I recognize beneficial cabbages;

Mr D' Adamo,   an illustrated guide please!

For Funkymuse the cabbages bénéfiques:brocoli, collard, kale, Kohlrabi, turnip, riding or fodder cabbage Look at this link : http://forum.aceboard.net/84260-857-5995-0-quel-chou.htm

Sorry for my bad english!

Revision History (4 edits)
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 5:43pm
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 5:40pm
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 5:37pm
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 5:36pm
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 73 - 81
Don
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 6:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 59
Quoted from chaton94
Mr D' Adamo,   an illustrated guide please!

Have you looked at the pictures in TYPEbase?


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 74 - 81
chaton94
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 6:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Yes i did, but it's so diffuclt, with the different name : english and french!

Do you  know savoy cabbage, i didn't see him on the typebase? is it beneficial for 0?

Thanks!

Revision History (3 edits)
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 9:30pm
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 9:30pm
Schluggell  -  Sunday, December 24, 2006, 9:30pm
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 75 - 81
koahiatamadl
Sunday, December 24, 2006, 11:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Hunter ISTJ
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 568
Gender: Female
Location: Basel, CH
Age: 37
From the description on typebase I am inclined to think that the same rating applies to all cabbages unless they are stated separately.  If you read the description it covers white, green, red cabbage but also savoy and Chinese cabbage.  Hope this helps!  Love your pictures etc. in your posts!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 76 - 81
linnsmama
Wednesday, December 27, 2006, 8:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from funkymuse
I didn't think O's were supposed to eat cabbage?


I think that was what ER4YT said, however in LR4YT, it is listed as a neutral for secretors and avoid for nonnies.  I've left the cabbage out of my Kale Slaw recipe and never missed it.  Just gimme that kale!!!!!!

-Robin
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 77 - 81
Elizabeth
Monday, January 1, 2007, 8:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 360
Kohlrabi is great, but not always available.  I sometimes just go with "cabbage cabbage" (i.e. plain old) anyway, as despite being an O, I do have digestive troubles that easily imbalance me to candida excess.  Celery, parsley, and cabbage are a great combo for that.  I also use a vitamix, and sometimes just make an elaborate juice/puree (with lemon, cilantro, carrot or some cooked yellow vegetable, a bit of apple, dash of salt, collard leaf, etc. along with the celery/parsley/cabbage base).  It is delicious, and boy does that help plump up the skin.  I think the celery contains a lot of silica.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 78 - 81
zola
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 7:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT4 - Explorer
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 487
Location: WA, USA
Age: 42
Newest Creation with Kale:

Minced up a Bunch of Kale ~ 4 Cups
Sauteed in Olive Oil & Garlic
Added Four cups precooked Brown Rice
Poured in ~1/2 C Turkey Stock
Mixed in 1/2 C Pesto (walnut)

Garnish with chopped walnuts &/or nutritional yeast &/or serve w/turkey
makes four generous servings


It is so pleasant to explore nature & oneself at the same time, doing violence neither to her nor to one's own spirit, but bringing both into balance in gentle, mutual interaction.

Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 79 - 81
jayney-O
Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 7:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
sounds yummy...
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 80 - 81
Lola
Wednesday, January 3, 2007, 1:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,428
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 58
thanks for sharing zola!

sounds very polyamine lowering to me! )


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 81 - 81
4 Pages 1 2 3 4 All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Kale and Collard

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread