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BTD Forums    Lifestyle    Cook Right 4 Your Type  ›  Kale and Collard
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Kale and Collard  This thread currently has 2,875 views. Print Print Thread
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Victoria
Friday, December 8, 2006, 5:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm going to look into that waterless cookware, B.B.  It sounds great!



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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jayney-O
Friday, December 8, 2006, 7:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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traditional  cooking  makes me suspect  that something was working...that there was a reason it was done that way, and not just to please the kids...tho now everyone says you shouldn't cook collards long...I wonder. There is a collard festival in east palo alto....I'm going to start a new thread to mention this.
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Alia Vo
Saturday, December 9, 2006, 1:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Kyosha Nim
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Steaming collards or any vegetables in a food steamer produces tender and flavorful vegetables.  I like collards and kale cooked when they just turn bright green and are crisp--not overly done.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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halpics
Sunday, December 10, 2006, 3:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks for the cooking info MoDon...I couldn't find your last post about it.. I grew collards for the fall and have been enjoying them the last few months... never realized how delicious the small ones were just raw... I tried your longer cooking with just water and they were so sweet tasting, just delicious!  Mom thought I had put sugar in them!
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Victoria
Sunday, December 10, 2006, 3:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I've been thinking about the cooking time for greens like collards.  Some of you have mentioned putting them into salads, stir frying and lightly steaming.  I remember when I was young and we had the collards and other greens that were so good, and cooked for hours.  Those were BIG plants, I mean, very mature greens . . . none of these little tender, fresh, new leaves.  There is no way we could have eaten those big tough leaves without long cooking.  I don't know why they were so big, but when I would bring them in from the garden, they were almost as big as me!  

Maybe that's the difference in long cooking vs. lightly steaming or raw.



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Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
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BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Has anyone tried cooking collards/kale/turnips in a crock pot. Since long slow cooking is needed I was just wondering if anyone had tried this and if so how did they turn out.
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Lola
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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excellent! )


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BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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What kind of time are we looking at 4,6,8 hrs? I am assuming low temp.
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Lola
Monday, December 11, 2006, 12:58am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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yes.....I leave them overnight. 8 hours and low temp......but also add meat and bones.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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BuzyBee
Monday, December 11, 2006, 2:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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What kinda meat. Most people put pork but being that it is an avoid what is the best choice. Also since I like potatoes cut up and cooked in the greens and since that is a no- no how about rutabaga. They are very close to potatoe as far as taste and texture. In fact once I had rutabage in cabbage and did not know that it was not potatoe.
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Elizabeth
Monday, December 11, 2006, 4:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I find that if I put two cloves of garlic in a lot of water, boil ten minutes, then add the kale or collards, it improves the dish.  To get stuff to cook quickly, after you wash them off, roll the leaves longwise and slice in thin ribbons (about 1/8 inch across), then pop in the boiling water.  It will take far less time, and cook "soft".  I have not timed it, however.  A smallish bunch of kale, cooked that way, will make two medium sized servings on a plate.  It all bunches together, like spaghetti, and one gets it down without a volume struggle.   Delicious, just fewer leftovers.
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Victoria
Monday, December 11, 2006, 5:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Lamb or beef, with lots of meaty bones.  Go with what's compatible with your bloodtype.  Even turkey with lots of bones would work.



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Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
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Alia Vo
Monday, December 11, 2006, 6:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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A small bunch of collards with relatively young and small leaves does not need alot of cooking time--regardless of cooking method.  I find these bunches to be sweet tasting, as well.  

I remember in years past seeing some very big collard bunches at a conventional grocery store and I purchased one bunch; I believe more 'mature' collard bunch would require a longer cooking time.

Alia


Alia A. Vo
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BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 2:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Does anyone put duplins in their kale, collards, or turnips. They are made of flour. Not sure of the other ingredients. This is very popular in the south.


I mean Dumplings. Sorry for the misspelling. In response to Lola

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Lola
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 2:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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do you mean dumplings?


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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jayney-O
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 7:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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that's a southern thing? Darn, that sounds so good....but hey, flour. wrong balance, better to go with meat.
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BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 7:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Which you may use corn mill for the dumplings. I will ask one of my friends about the ingredients in these.
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Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oh Yeah!  I was raised on Chickens and Dumplings, and how fine it was!!

(Of course, little did I know that I was steadily poisoning myself!)  My body let me in on that fact, a few years down the road.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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BuzyBee
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I am sure the recipe can be adjusted to meet the BTD. Mainly, flour(spelt), cornmeal, and water. If milk is needed use soy, almond, or rice.

I believe they are made like cornbread but boiled in with greens instead of baked or fried.

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Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:22pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It's basically a biscuit type dough, shaped into little balls and boiled in chicken broth, with plenty of shredded meat also in the broth.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Laura P
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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If you really wanted dumplings you could make them out of nutflour

Let's do this if someone makes collards and says hey, this is great! post what you did here, like MoDon did



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geminisue
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 8:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Laura is nut flour the same thing as i.e. almond meal ? Do you use it the same as flour? Thanks!
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Victoria
Thursday, December 14, 2006, 10:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Almond meal is nut flour.  It has no gluten, so take that into account if you are baking with it.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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jayney-O
Friday, December 15, 2006, 5:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I really don't think it would make a very good dumpling, dumplings being soft and light at best, heavy and dense, not good .....I don't suggest the nut flour. (hope I'm not dashing anybody's hopes....I'd go with a compliant flour) (apologies to Laura P)

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OSuzanna
Saturday, December 16, 2006, 2:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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How 'bout just not calling them dumplings, so the expectations won't be there....

Thanks for the thread, guys, I've been thinking about adding collards &/or kale to our diet, but hesitating out of fear & ignorance!

BTW, can I be just completely opinionated? The "waterless" cookware just sounds gimmicky to me, vegetable water has so many uses. I'm not saying it's not a clever way of cooking, just missing the pleasures of broth. Otherwise, I'm sticking to my stainless steel no-special-care, no-fuss cookware.

Look forward to trying above-mentioned recipes & cooking hints!


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