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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Why is umeboshi plum vinegar a beneficial?
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Christopher1
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 2:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Why is umeboshi plum vinegar a beneficial in my SWAMI?
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Lloyd
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 3:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Why not?

No one can give you the specific answer. Something or things in the nutritional profile is useful for you, most likely.
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BluesSinger
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 3:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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ok so how does one use this product?  
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Lola
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 4:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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it is fermented plum......full of enzymes

great addition to healing your gut and immune system boost......isn t that beneficial enough?

read more about fermentation

http://www.bing.com/search?cp=1252&FORM=FREESS&q=fermentation&q1=site%3Adadamo.com


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Chloe
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 4:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
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I use it as the vinegar in salad dressings.  I also marinate all sorts of things in it....tofu, veggies,
and I make sauces using it....mixing it with any nut butter, some toasted sesame oil, ginger....as in
Asian sauces.  It's a very alkalizing vinegar with a lot of health benefits.

This information comes from a manufacturer of umeboshi vinegar.  You might find it interesting.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF UMEBOSHI

Besides their dramatic flavor, Japanese pickled plums have remarkable medicinal qualities. Their powerful acidity has a paradoxical alkalinizing effect on the body, neutralizing fatigue, stimulating the digestion, and promoting the elimination of toxins. This is the Far Eastern equivalent to both aspirin and apple; not only is it a potent hangover remedy for mornings after; more than that, an umeboshi a day is regarded as one of the best preventive medicines available.

Like many of Japan's ancient medicinal foods, the origin of the pickled plum is obscure. One theory traces it to China, where a dried smoked plum, or ubai, was discovered in a tomb built over two thousand years ago. The ubai is one of China's oldest medicines and is still used for a variety of medical purposes such as counteracting nausea, reducing fevers, and controlling coughs.

The oldest Japanese record of pickled plums being used as a medicine is in a medical text written about one thousand years ago. Umeboshi were used to prevent fatigue, purify water, rid the body of toxins, and cure specific diseases such as dysentery, typhoid, and food poisoning. Slowly, extensive folklore developed about umeboshi's ability to prevent and cure certain diseases.

During Japan's furious samurai period, which lasted through most of the Middle Ages, the pickled plum was the soldier's most important field ration. It was used to flavor foods such as rice and vegetables, and its high acidity made it an excellent water and food purifier, as well as an effective antidote for battle fatigue.

Almost 200 years ago, the Japanese began experimenting with ways to concentrate the healing powers of umeboshi. Finally, a dark liquid called bainiku ekisu (plum extract) was developed. To make the extract, sour green ume plums are slowly cooked down to obtain their most active ingredients in a highly concentrated form. The resulting dark, sticky, thick liquid is usually mixed with hot water and honey and is drunk as a tonic. Dried plum extract is also formed into pills, called meitan. In both plum extract and meitan, the plums' citric acid content is concentrated tenfold, which is equivalent to about twenty-five times the content found in lemon juice.

Many natural healers around the world feel that these concentrated forms of Japanese plums are among the world's most effective natural medicines. Moreover, they do not have the high salt content of pickled plums.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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BluesSinger
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 4:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It's pretty salty and strong!  Really?  mix with nut butter?  use as a vinegar base?  so it must not take alot!  
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Chloe
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 5:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from BluesSinger
It's pretty salty and strong!  Really?  mix with nut butter?  use as a vinegar base?  so it must not take alot!  


I'll tell you how I make my dressing.

It's a splash of ume plum vinegar, a splash of toasted sesame oil, a little EVOO, whisked together.
Then I add a little water to some almond butter until it's thinner and blend it into other
ingredients.  I sometimes add dry mustard, a little grated ginger, some chopped green onions or
a little tamari, garlic.  I never really follow recipes.....sort of mix flavors and SWAMI ingredients together.

My beneficials and neutrals won't be yours....I often use peanut butter instead of almond
butter and sometimes a squirt or two of agave syrup or maple syrup.  It's a matter of balancing
sweet and sour, salty and sweet.  You have to keep tasting as you go.  It's not a lot of ume vinegar
that you're using.

Probably you can stir some prepared grainy mustard in with a little ume plum vinegar and whisk
in any compliant oil until you have an emulsion.  Make a basic dressing just like you'd be making a vinaigrette.....only this is your vinegar.

Season with your compliant seasonings.

Here's some basic vinaigrette options
http://www.food.com/recipe/basic-vinaigrette-dressing-with-8-variations-213989

I often take a package of frozen veggies, put them in a pan, sprinkle with a little ume vinegar,
EVOO, tamari, garlic and seasonings and bake uncovered.  Works well with broccoli, cauliflower,
onions and carrots.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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ruthiegirl
Sunday, May 26, 2013, 5:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'll often add a few drops to my plate of cooked veggies and/or rice. It's very salty- a few drops adds a lot of flavor.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Christopher1
Monday, May 27, 2013, 2:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Did some research on it. It's supposed to be alkaline to your body.

Strange - since it's an acid.
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C_Sharp
Monday, May 27, 2013, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Quoted from Christopher1
Did some research on it. It's supposed to be alkaline to your body.

Strange - since it's an acid.


Lemon juice is the same way.

Also many of acid/alkaline concerned folks consider apple cide vinegar to be alkaline.


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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Christopher1
Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 2:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from C_Sharp


Lemon juice is the same way.

Also many of acid/alkaline concerned folks consider apple cide vinegar to be alkaline.


Thank you, C!
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BluesSinger
Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 2:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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excited to use this vinegar since all vinegars are a no no for me.  
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Christopher1
Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 8:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BluesSinger
excited to use this vinegar since all vinegars are a no no for me.  


Tastes so-so.
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 1:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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It doesn't taste like "regular vinegar." It has a very distinct taste that some love and some hate. I like a few drops in stir-fry, or on cooked broccoli or green beans for a hint of a "stir fry flavor." I think it's too salty to use as the only acid in a salad dressing.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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BluesSinger
Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 10:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from ruthiegirl
It doesn't taste like "regular vinegar." It has a very distinct taste that some love and some hate. I like a few drops in stir-fry, or on cooked broccoli or green beans for a hint of a "stir fry flavor." I think it's too salty to use as the only acid in a salad dressing.


yes only a few drops are key!  i added some to my beef stir fry once and it was fab!  it goes well with beef.. but again only a little bit!  it's more of a condiment than anything else.
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Chloe
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 12:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I love umeboshi vinegar.  It tastes more like salty, almost lemony water to me.  I also love the umeboshi
plums.....but they're so tart and sour, they stun my salivary glands!  


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Drea
Thursday, May 30, 2013, 1:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It's only rated neutral for me but I'm grateful it was tested at all! I use it liberally! But agree that a little goes a long way.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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