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shorter telomeres associated with......   This thread currently has 801 views. Print Print Thread
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Chloe
Friday, February 22, 2013, 4:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I could not fit the title of this thread in the subject line.....

'Shorter telomeres associated with decreased upper respiratory resistance"

The February 20, 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reports an association between decreased telomere length and greater susceptibility to the common cold. Telomeres are DNA complexes at the end of the chromosomes which shorten with repeated cell division, leading to cell senescence and impaired function. Reduced telomere length has also been associated with whole system aging-related conditions, including cardiovascular and infectious diseases.

"Our work suggests the possibility that telomere length is a relatively consistent marker across the life span and that it can start predicting disease susceptibility in young adulthood," stated lead researcher Sheldon Cohen, who is the Robert E. Doherty Professor of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University's Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. "We knew that people in their late 50s and older with shorter telomeres are at a greater risk for illness and mortality. We also knew that factors other than aging, such as chronic stress and poor health behaviors, are associated with shorter telomeres in older people. Consequently, we expected that younger people would vary in their telomere length as well and wanted to see what this would mean for their health."

The current study included 152 men and women between the ages of 18 to 55 years. Blood samples were analyzed for telomere length of four types of leukocytes (white blood cells), and participants were quarantined for six days. Nasal drops containing a rhinovirus were administered after the first 24 hours of quarantine, and the subjects were monitored for the remaining period.

Sixty-nine percent of the participants were determined to have been infected with the virus and clinical illness developed in 22 percent. Beginning at an approximate age of 22, shorter telomere length of any of the white blood cell types examined was associated with a greater risk of infection, with the risk increasing with greater age. "The increased importance of telomere length with age is likely because the younger participants had fewer very short telomeres, or that their young immune systems were able to compensate for the loss of effective cells," Dr Cohen commented.

A variety of white blood cell known as CD8CD28- was found to be the type of leukocyte in which decreased telomere length was associated with a significant increase in the risk of clinical illness. For those whose CD8CD28- cells had the shortest telomeres, the rate of clinical illness was twice that of subjects whose telomere length was longest. "These cells are important in eliminating infected cells and those with shorter telomeres in the CD8CD28- cell population may be at greater risk for infection because they have fewer functional cells available to respond to the virus," Dr Cohen said. "The superior ability of CD8CD28- T-cytolytic cells to predict infection gives us an idea of which cells to focus on in future work on how telomere length influences the immune system's response to infection and other immune-related challenges."

"This is preliminary research and further work with other viruses and with natural infections will help clarify its implications," he added.


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Spring
Friday, February 22, 2013, 8:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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I can see a lot of physicians giving this a cursory glance and quickly forgetting all about it. There is a lot of time and effort put into testing and finding things that would help us that never see the light of day. What doctor, do you suppose, knows that we need to balance Vitamin K2 with our calcium/Vitamin D3 intake? How many years, I wonder, has it taken them to start recommending D3 instead of D2??

I had the job of librarian when I was volunteering at a hospital in another city a long time ago. Part of the job was going through all the medical journals that came to the hospital library to find articles that were considered something the doctors needed to take note of for their practice. Some of them were really glad for this service because it kept them from having to browse through hundreds of pages of ads screaming at them. Also, it helped them know what was new for their specialty without so much research. Maybe some of these hospitals need more help in their libraries to help get the research results into the faces of the doctors instead of the blaring ads for every drug under the sun!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Lola
Friday, February 22, 2013, 8:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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http://www.search.ask.com/web?l=dis&o=13156&qsrc=2873&q=decreased%20telomere%20length

a clear sign of aging and disease

take your trehalose!! ha


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Spring
Friday, February 22, 2013, 8:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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When I said "us," I meant people in general. Thankfully, this article is not Greek to Dr. D.'s followers!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Lin
Friday, February 22, 2013, 10:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Spring, I was wondering where I could find out how to balance Vitamin K2 with  calcium/Vitamin D3 etc., what amounts of each. Have you seen this written anywhere?
Lin


Gluten/Casein and Yeast sensitivity.
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Spring
Friday, February 22, 2013, 11:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Lin
Spring, I was wondering where I could find out how to balance Vitamin K2 with  calcium/Vitamin D3 etc., what amounts of each. Have you seen this written anywhere?Lin

Strangely enough, they are not giving any upper limits on Vitamin K now. All the testing they have done has not shown that it causes any problems. It certainly would be interesting to get Dr. D.'s input on this, but I don't see that happening any time soon.

Is there anyone on this forum that knows whether this email address is valid:

bobm@northamericanpharmacal.com


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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C_Sharp
Friday, February 22, 2013, 11:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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Quoted from Spring

Strangely enough, they are not giving any upper limits on Vitamin K now. All the testing they have done has not shown that it causes any problems. It certainly would be interesting to get Dr. D.'s input on this, but I don't see that happening any time soon.

Is there anyone on this forum that knows whether this email address is valid:

bobm@northamericanpharmacal.com


I emailed the above address on Wednesday of this week, and got a response on Thursday from swamixpress@northamericanpharmacal.com


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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Spring
Saturday, February 23, 2013, 2:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks, C_Sharp. I should have gone ahead and called instead of writing. I'm seriously chomping at the bit to get started taking more Vitamin K2, but I need some input before I order it.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Spring
Sunday, February 24, 2013, 5:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Lin
Spring, I was wondering where I could find out how to balance Vitamin K2 with  calcium/Vitamin D3 etc., what amounts of each. Have you seen this written anywhere? Lin

I just now posted this on the Vitamin D thread. I did finally find a recommendation for the amount to take: 100 IU's K2 for every 1000 IU's V. D3.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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