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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Why does Dr. D recommend chemo for cancer? *
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Why does Dr. D recommend chemo for cancer? *
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AKArtlover
Thursday, June 21, 2012, 7:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

centered leaning INTP Explorer, Supertaster, SWAMI
Kyosha Nim
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Live Cell O has some nice sprouts in it. Very convenient form.


"For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother's womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well." Psalm 139:13,14
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, May 17, 2013, 1:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Genotype = Gatherer; BT/GTDer since 97 and lost 97
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Dr. D


Thanks for bringing this point up. I hadn't ever thought to discuss this important point.

Because in many instances, without it, people die unnecessarily.

Is that a ringing endorsement of modern oncology? No, but what do you propose instead to tell a kid with a pediatric leukemia that is highly treatable: to juice raw liver in take coffee enemas instead? Years ago I had a patient who had a stage three testicular cancer. This cancer is 100% curable with chemotherapy. His wife, a massage therapist, was pushing that he go 'completely natural.'   I politely explained that there were many, many options he could use to help control and optimize his results, but it would not be wise to forgo a treatment such as this, which was so reliably successful. They opted instead to do juice fasts and go elsewhere. Six months later they were back in my office, he riddled with metastasis, now taking that very same chemo to simply 'debulk' the cancer and help him survive a bit longer pain free.

Epic fail.

I'm currently monitoring two brain cancer cases who are bucking the odds for long-term survival. In both cases they received convention treatment plus a tailored regimen from me. I doubt if they had received only one or the other that they would be alive today, though I am certain that Gary Null and Joe Mercola would have told them that this was all a big mistake. Trouble is, where are these guys when the patient comes back with the recurrence. I can tell you they are no where in sight. That's when they send in the assistant to tell you that 'maybe it is time to do the chemotherapy.'

Antineoplastons work in a very small number of people. I've seen several patients on Bryzinski's treatment, with no concurrent chemotherapy, die. Movies are nice, but reality should also include what they don't tell you. People die on Gerson Therapy. Chemo is not the be-all and end-all and some people are going to die no matter what.

A primitive approach, IMHO, is to base your decision on broad sweeping conclusions drawn from consumer reading material that limits your ability to decide what is the right thing to do then and there.

My goals are quite simple: to get my patients from one side of the river over to the other. If I can do that with exclusively naturopathic modalities, so much the better. If in order to do that I need to combine modalities, well, that is part of the equation. If the only way that I would agree to ferry them across would be to require them to do only that which is acceptable to me I would not be much a ferryman, now would I?

Hopes, aesthetics and dreams are nice. I get up five days a week and deal with realities.

Big difference.

BTW, the Hippocratic notion of 'first do no harm' (primum non nocere) is not an accurate interpretation. It is more accurately, 'if at all possible, do no harm.' i.e it is a heuristic, not an algorithm. If it were a law then draining a abscess or giving a B12 injection would be a violation.

I know I've commented on this thread a long time ago, but I just saw it again and have to add:  Dr. D, I've been on this board since 1999.  I have read many brilliant posts by you.  This one is the most brilliant.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - me -

Jung/Myers-Briggs personality type:  INFJ
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2degreespisces
Friday, May 17, 2013, 3:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks for re-posting Dr D's enlightning text, Peppermint Twist.

I wouldn't be alive today if I hadn't had BOTH chemo and access to good, healthy, healing food through BTD/SWAMI.

On chemo alone I wouldn't have prospered as I have, without chemo I would have died.

So there's a time and a place for all treatments, even for chemo, and eating right should be a daily way of being/staying/becoming the healtiest possible YOU you can be.


Happiness is the highest form of wisdom.

ENFP / Pisces sun, Scorpio moon, Capricorn ascendant.
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Victoria
Friday, May 17, 2013, 8:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Sometimes I wish there was a LIKE button here.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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san j
Friday, May 17, 2013, 11:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'd never seen this essay of Dr. D'Adamo's before.

It reminds me of my own use of the "ferrying across the raging river" analogy I began using a decade ago in my own practice. (Always knew this doctor and I had stuff in common.   )
I blogged approx. 7 years ago here about bridging standard and alternative approaches, and where our best option is often to cooperate with the arena in which an unstable client/ patient has the strongest support system. Being "holistic" can mean taking more into consideration than a few probability percentage points on a scale that excludes "psychological" (if that's what you want to call it) factors. You work enough with people, you discover the power of those factors, and you deeply, deeply respect them.
Within the context of a program that works, such as the chemotherapies for various cancers, sometimes we have to defend ourselves against the diehard, uncompromising, very unholistic "holistic" ideologues.


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libralion
Thursday, May 14, 2015, 7:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi everybody,
Cancer. It is a terrible disease.  I think everybody knows somebody in his family that suffered from it. I lost my mother to cancer.
After that I began to search for the meaning of cancer. What is it and why do people get it.
I think we always have to look at more than the physical side of it. I would never take any chemo. But everybody should choose what is good for him or her.
Years ago I read the book of Louise Hay "You can heal your life" : http://realrawfood.com/sites/d.....ouise%20L.%20Hay.pdf
In that book she explains why she got cancer and how she cured it. By changing what she thought about herself and changing her food pattern.
I think if you use the BTD/ GTD and start changing your mental patterns you are on the right way to cure your cancer.
I don't say that that will cure all cancer. There might be karmic patterns, that demand that you can't cure it. But by changing your mental patterns and changing your food pattern you are on the right track.
I wrote a blogpost about cancer and the breats of Angelina Jolie to explain what I think about it all. You can find it here: http://www.libralion.com/blog/?s=angelina+jolie
I think that all diseases are caused by a certain mental pattern. So try to find out what is behind a disease and change the mental patterns that you have and you will have a big opportunity to heal yourself.

An example from my own life: years ago I had an elevated bloodsugar level. I read about it. A good book for instance is from Kurt Tepperwein "Think and Heal" : http://www.amazon.com/THINK-HEAL-Your-Really-Illnesses/dp/B000NB1QPO
I found out that diabetes means that you have lots of love to give, but you have had some major disappointments in that area in your life and because of that you stop expressing your love and hold everything within. That is causing the diabetes.
it is so understandable of course. So what did I do? As difficult as it was, I started to express my love again. I expressed my vulnerable side again. Very scary, but it was the only way.
I also found the herb Herb-Robert (Robert Geranium, Mountain Geranium) in my garden. You will always find the herbs in your garden, that you need. Herb-Robert (Robert Geranium, Mountain Geranium) helps, among other things, against diabetes. So I started to drink tea from it.
And in time my bloodsugar levels were right again.

So I think a disease is a way of your body to say, that you have to change things. Both in your food pattern and well as in your mental beliefs.
Just my opinion of course.

Johanna  


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san j
Friday, July 8, 2016, 6:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
It's indeed important for those punctilious to follow a pathfinding practitioner / theorist such as yourself to think for themselves, too, in the moment, and be prepared to make choices they never thought they'd make or have to make, if these are what are called for.

Wrote it 4 years ago and rings true.
I'm a "philosophical" type, and the longer I live and witness, the more I see each case as utterly unique.
It is the job of a sick person (or, sometimes, a partner/caregiver) to make a judgment call -- something he or she (and/or survivors) will have to live with. Mistakes are made, or seem to be made, and, y'know, that's Life. We do our best.
Someone pursues chemo.
Someone else doesn't like the odds and doesn't go for the drug.
Someone says, "Hospice," while someone else says "Radical treatment"...and we're all just doing the best we can.
Remember that we all have different spiritual profiles, too, driving these decisions. Some people have more fear-of-death than others and want to go out fighting, even if it means only a few extra months. The really good oncologists are sensitive to this stuff; their experience has taught them about these "hidden" factors' being -often- the really MAJOR ones, the ones that matter.
Doctors and all healthcare practitioners must learn, sooner or later, that practice isn't a black-white playing field; winning and losing are values applied to different elements for different people. Prolongation of life may not be the most important factor.
In the context of the less extreme health challenges, too -- different patients will idealize surprisingly different outcomes, and it isn't a practitioner's - or anyone else's - place to judge the patient's choices. Responsible patients will investigate their options, and good practitioners will bring viable options into the mix but not insist on any one of them.

I was sometimes asked by my postpartum clients/couples what they should do. I would tell them their options as I saw them, and I'd present different flow charts for each one. We'd back-and-forth and come up with Plans A and B and then start down the road. Sometimes we'd bring in another opinion. But I'd never tell a client what she should do. I'd say, "Whatever you decide, I will work with you."
If a doctor says, "I cannot be your oncologist unless you take this drug," then maybe he works for the drug company, but he doesn't work for YOU.

Closer to home, here at the Forum, I would never say to someone, "I can't take you seriously if you, an O, eat dairy," because I trust folks to choose what - on whatever level, works for them. I know that others are stricter. Maybe I've seen too much really ugly fallout when people's overall Life Outlooks/Philosophies are misunderstood or mocked.
We'll all face our Maker and answer to Him.

Chemo may or may not be right for some minds/hearts/spirits/bodies under some circumstances.
Gray areas are part of Life -- mine, anyway, and I'm okay with that.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
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Averno
Friday, July 8, 2016, 4:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from san j


...Closer to home, here at the Forum, I would never say to someone, "I can't take you seriously if you, an O, eat dairy," because I trust folks to choose what - on whatever level, works for them. I know that others are stricter. Maybe I've seen too much really ugly fallout when people's overall Life Outlooks/Philosophies are misunderstood or mocked.



An otherwise excellent post, but...  

Has the above statement ever been expressed on these forums? I have seen plenty of advocacy for healthier food choices countered with unhealthy Life Outlook/Philosophical advice OTOH. And plenty of denial regarding connections and outcomes.

Most of us here do try to convey that some of our food choices have negative consequences. Some obvious, some not, and to differing degrees for each individual. But consequences they are, and up to each of us to act upon... whether to ignore or accept honestly. Perhaps is this misunderstood as mocking one's Life Outlook/Philosophy?
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Amazone I.
Friday, July 8, 2016, 5:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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as a certain  "savant" said: "chemo heals cancer and the earth is a disk"........ ok if you're into this believe system go for it.......why not... if this is your conviction..........can be nothing but mortal... jööööö.... ....

I'm a very realistic person and saved some  gentle lives.. I'm not proud of it but I'm faithful coz todays I know how to respond... but I'm
aware about trust... and how to procceed...


MIfHI K-174
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Patty H
Friday, July 8, 2016, 5:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from San j

Quoted Text

Closer to home, here at the Forum, I would never say to someone, "I can't take you seriously if you, an O, eat dairy," because I trust folks to choose what - on whatever level, works for them.


Quoted from Averno


An otherwise excellent post, but...  

Has the above statement ever been expressed on these forums? I have seen plenty of advocacy for healthier food choices countered with unhealthy Life Outlook/Philosophical advice OTOH. And plenty of denial regarding connections and outcomes.

Most of us here do try to convey that some of our food choices have negative consequences. Some obvious, some not, and to differing degrees for each individual. But consequences they are, and up to each of us to act upon... whether to ignore or accept honestly. Perhaps is this misunderstood as mocking one's Life Outlook/Philosophy?


I agree with this, Averno.  This is, after all, Dr. D's forum designed to help us connect and share on the basic principles and guidelines he provides.

IMHO, too many people make up their own rules, not because it is healthy or what Dr. D recommends, but because of their relationship with the foods they are loathe to give up.  It might work for them by satisfying their relationship with that specific food, but is it working for them from a health perspective?  Probably not.

There are, of course, examples of people who include what would be considered avoids for specific health reasons.  Mother's avocado comes to mind.  I believe she struggled with the decision to incorporate this food to help deal with her Type 1 diabetes.  She was relentless in trying to figure out if it would cause lectin damage or if there were other reasons it is an avoid for O secretors.  She made a decision to include this into her regimen and has found that it has had a profoundly positive impact on stabilizing her blood sugar.

My own occasional inclusion of eating Brussels Sprouts and cauliflower, both avoids, is similar.   Since I know I am toxic in lead and mercury and along with broccoli, they are highly beneficial in helping to protect the body agains the ravages of the heavy metals, I made the choice to eat them.  I eat more broccoli than any of the three but one can only eat so much broccoli . . .

Certain foods, such as wheat, most dairy, corn and most sugar, are in a totally different avoid category.  They are known to be inflammatory and the Achilles heal of O's is chronic inflammation.  Eating them (which I admit I do on vacation) on a regular basis is not following the basic principles of the diet.  It's fine if folks feel the need to justify their choices but your example of O's and dairy is a glaring one and when folks choose to not follow the diets as outlined and then promote their cheating as ok for others as well, then that does not serve the rest of us well - particularly newbies.  If you want to cheat, do it - but why the need to justify it and try to get others to join you?

When I was a newbie here, I did follow a LOT of very bad advice I found on this forum and it was a wakeup call for me and did not serve me well.  Personally, I think we owe it to Dr. D to try to be as true to his diets as possible and when we do cheat - KNOW that we are cheating without the need to justify our decision to others as being within the guidelines.  Just my humble opinion.  


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san j
Friday, July 8, 2016, 7:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Averno
An otherwise excellent post, but...  

Sorry you don't see how the dots connect, but I'll accept the compliment about the part you understood.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
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Averno
Friday, July 8, 2016, 9:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j

Sorry you don't see how the dots connect, but I'll accept the compliment about the part you understood.  


I understood your entire post. I know a false premise when I see one  
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