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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Determining kids genotype
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Determining kids genotype  This thread currently has 543 views. Print Print Thread
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Dianet52
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 8:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Secretor HUNTER
Early Spring: Awareness, desire.
Posts: 24
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Age: 50
I am wondering if we can use all the same gauges/tests in the book to also determine our childrens genotype. Any reason not? Thx
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koahiatamadl
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 8:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Hunter ISTJ
Kyosha Nim
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As I understand it the ratios don't hold as a child's body is growing and proportions are still changing.  You could probably narrow it down with blood type and secretor status but the measurements would be a problem.  

On the upside feeding children according to blood type should give them an excellent start    
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C_Sharp
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 8:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher Rh+ Lewis: a+b-, NN,Taster
Sa Bon Nim
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Topic has been discussed before.

Summary of discussion:

Kids measurements are not stable, so you are unlikely to get a reliable measurement unless they are over 15 (some have said 13 for females, but others have disputed that they have actually finished growing at that point).

Here are a few messages on the subject (additional messages available by using search):


http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1198775668/s-73/highlight-child/#num72

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1198071004/s-264/highlight-child/#num264

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1205923297


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.

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C_Sharp  -  Saturday, September 27, 2008, 10:22pm
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Kristin
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 12:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT6 Nomad
Kyosha Nim
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I really question the 15 yo mark... and especially the 13 yo mark for females. I was 5'10'' at 13. I am now 6'1" and (almost) a half so I grew 3.5 inches past my 13th birthday.

I know that the growth plates on the ends of the long bones do not ossify until about the age of 23 so we are capable of growing up until that point... not that it would be much though. But with the GenoType Diet, we are often talking about fractions of inches so... could be???


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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Ribbit
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 12:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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I quit growing at 12.  I'm 5'6".

We have my 5 y.o. AB on the Explorer diet. Based on the food allergies we know she has (despite being on the A nonnie diet), we here on the board decided she might be an Explorer, since those very foods she has trouble with Explorers aren't supposed to eat anyway.  The AB nonnie diet helped her a lot.  But the Explorer diet has been even better.  And if she's not an Explorer?  Oh, well, what have we got to lose?  It's still a lot better than anything else we've tried.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Lola
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 1:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted Text
Dr D
As for kids, the best thing is to get the possible GTs from blood type, then strength test each against the other. Finally, use a little intuition, once you get a feel for each type.


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Ribbit
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 12:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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While we're on the subject, I have a question about how the genotype is determined in the womb.

The thrifty types, which seem to have extra weight no matter what....does it mean their mothers didn't (or couldn't) eat enough during pregnancy, so the baby's body thought they were in a famine and needed to store up extra fat?  Okay, that sounded mean.  How about this:  does it mean the baby didn't get enough nutrients in the womb and thought they were in a famine?

It makes me wonder about another side of the "obesity epidemic".  It wasn't all that long ago that doctors were telling mothers they could only gain like 15 lbs during pregnancy (my MIL told me this).  Uh, hullo, I gain upwards of 55*, and I have 8-10+ lb babies.  A 15 lb weight gain isn't generally enough to grow an 8 lb baby.  What if doctors in the last generation, because of their ignorance and silly rules, caused the babies' DNA to switch on all sorts of life-saving, famine-induced genes to keep weight on them the rest of their lives?

*The child-bearing years are young, Ribbit.  You  may be speaking too early.  Maybe, being on the GTD, you won't gain that much .... next time around.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Kristin
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 6:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Ribbit

It makes me wonder about another side of the "obesity epidemic".  It wasn't all that long ago that doctors were telling mothers they could only gain like 15 lbs during pregnancy (my MIL told me this).  Uh, hullo, I gain upwards of 55*, and I have 8-10+ lb babies.  A 15 lb weight gain isn't generally enough to grow an 8 lb baby.  What if doctors in the last generation, because of their ignorance and silly rules, caused the babies' DNA to switch on all sorts of life-saving, famine-induced genes to keep weight on them the rest of their lives?

*The child-bearing years are young, Ribbit.  You  may be speaking too early.  Maybe, being on the GTD, you won't gain that much .... next time around.


I am quite sure that the weight limitations imposed by obstetricians had an epigenetic effect on the metabolism of the developing fetus. A 30-40 pound weight gain is desired for a healthy pregnancy... but some even postulate that an unrestricted weight gain as long as the mother-to-be is eating healthy foods is even better. And there are women who gain 50-60 pounds with every pregnancy and it is normal for them. Also the type of weight gain makes a difference too. Some women become quite edematous during pregnancy which can add pounds but is not a "healthy" type of weight gain.

But I think your assumption is correct... coupled with the SAD diet that most children are fed with makes it easy for obesity to occur.


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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Ribbit
Monday, September 29, 2008, 1:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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In Florida if you gain more than 50 lbs. during a pregnancy you legally can't continue with a midwife and you're supposed to go to a dr. and be admitted to the hospital and you're considered high-risk.  But my midwife knew I had a great diet and she wasn't worried.  She said my charts indicated that my weight leveled out at 50 lbs.   I had thought that Ethan was so big because I gained so much weight.  But one day I realized the opposite was true:  I gained so much weight to be able to support a baby that big.  He nursed and nursed and nursed to keep up that weight.  Now I'm glad I had all that extra fat on me--he needed it.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Dr. D
Monday, September 29, 2008, 10:21am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Peter D'Adamo
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You strength-test kids up until 15-17.


A whole system is a living system is a learning system.’ -Stewart Brand
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Andrea AWsec
Monday, September 29, 2008, 10:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI INFJ Warrior Taster
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from Ribbit
While we're on the subject, I have a question about how the genotype is determined in the womb.

The thrifty types, which seem to have extra weight no matter what....does it mean their mothers didn't (or couldn't) eat enough during pregnancy, so the baby's body thought they were in a famine and needed to store up extra fat?  Okay, that sounded mean.  How about this:  does it mean the baby didn't get enough nutrients in the womb and thought they were in a famine?

It makes me wonder about another side of the "obesity epidemic".  It wasn't all that long ago that doctors were telling mothers they could only gain like 15 lbs during pregnancy (my MIL told me this).  Uh, hullo, I gain upwards of 55*, and I have 8-10+ lb babies.  A 15 lb weight gain isn't generally enough to grow an 8 lb baby.  What if doctors in the last generation, because of their ignorance and silly rules, caused the babies' DNA to switch on all sorts of life-saving, famine-induced genes to keep weight on them the rest of their lives?

*The child-bearing years are young, Ribbit.  You  may be speaking too early.  Maybe, being on the GTD, you won't gain that much .... next time around.


I agree with you.. Ribbit. The womb is a very special place.
Ribbit you are before your time
Does anyone remember how MDs would tell women to smoke during pregnancy so they wouldn't gain too much weight?



MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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Ribbit
Tuesday, September 30, 2008, 12:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Some people say I think outside the box.  I say "Oh, was there a box?"  Sometimes being clueless and ADD and has it's benefits.  It means I don't necessarily know what other people are saying, and I'm less likely to care when I do know!  lol


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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