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Mayflowers
Wednesday, July 30, 2008, 7:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Are butter beans another word for Lima beans?

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A island mama
Wednesday, July 30, 2008, 7:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think there must be a distinct difference b/c for Warriors, butter beans are a super food and lima beans are an avoid.  In the grocery store I found frozen butter "peas" that actually look like beans.  This is what I have been using in the butter bean and parsley recipe from the GTD site.  They are much smaller than lima beans.

Can I anyone confirm if BUTTER BEANS and BUTTER PEAS are the same thing???
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Ribbit
Wednesday, July 30, 2008, 7:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I assume butter beans and butter peas are the same thing.  I grew up calling dry limas "limas" but the ones we grew in the garden and shelled, or bought frozen, we called "butter beans."  They're different according to the frozen packages.

Butter peas are fatter than limas.  There are big limas and small limas.  The small limas are about the size of butter peas, but the peas are fat and the limas are thin.


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Chloe
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 12:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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A island mama
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 12:40am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks...quite informative!  I looked for butter peas on the site and came up with nothing.  I have to assume that they are indeed butter BEANS and that the name is a southern term, since it is a "Publix" brand product and as far as I know, Publix supermarkets are only found in the southern states.
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Lloyd
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 12:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Wikipedia has a solid article that covers the same points as wisegeek with some other information, as well. Could be confusing. This takeaway from the end of the article seems a descriptive reference to consider:

Quoted from Wikipedia
In culinary use, lima beans and butter beans are distinctly different, the former being small and green, the latter large and yellow. In areas where both are considered to be lima beans, the green variety may be labeled as "baby" limas.
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LarryC.
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 12:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Giant White is a large, flat, cream colored bean about 1 inch in length. This bean is similar to the Christmas Lima in length but slimmer in width. This Lima is also referred to as a butter, curry, Madagascar, lab, or Pole Beans, another reference is the Cape Pea. The Giant White Lima has creamy texture and a savory flavor. It is native to Central America. This bean found its way to Peru several millennia ago. Spanish explorers brought the bean to Europe where it thrived in the temperate climate, the slave trade carried the bean to Africa where they are now one of the most important beans on the continent. In Greece they are called Gigandes.


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Chloe
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 1:36am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/plants/fabaceae/phaseolus_lunatus.htm

Their botanical name of lima and butter beans seems to be the same.. Although butter beans appear to be a later domestication.... It's the  same issue I had figuring out which white beans I should eat.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Drea
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 2:00am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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There was some question a while back regarding "broad" beans. WF was selling them prepared in their deli department. They tasted good, and I didn't have a reaction (that I noticed) from eating them, but I treated them as a "once in a while thing", just in case.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Lloyd
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 2:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Drea
There was some question a while back regarding "broad" beans. WF was selling them prepared in their deli department. They tasted good, and I didn't have a reaction (that I noticed) from eating them, but I treated them as a "once in a while thing", just in case.


Broad beans (Fava beans) are Warrior diamonds. Only question is what they were prepared with.  

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Drea
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 2:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Nice! Thanks, Lloyd! WF were prepared with olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic (to the best of my recollection).


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Mayflowers
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 5:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks Chloe on the butter beans link! I saw "Butter Beans" canned in the store, and on the back of the can it said "also called lima beans" which I know is an avoid so I didn't buy them.. Do you think they were really lima beans and not butter beans? They were also $1.89 for a can  

I ate fava beans once and I sort of felt weird so I haven't had them since. I get odd reactions from beans..Garbanzos give me a spotted rash.  
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Chloe
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 6:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 815
Thanks Chloe on the butter beans link! I saw "Butter Beans" canned in the store, and on the back of the can it said "also called lima beans" which I know is an avoid so I didn't buy them.. Do you think they were really lima beans and not butter beans? They were also $1.89 for a can  

I ate fava beans once and I sort of felt weird so I haven't had them since. I get odd reactions from beans..Garbanzos give me a spotted rash.  



I'm perpetually confused over the bean issue.  A superfood for Warriors is butter beans (or is it a diamond, I forget)?? and a lima bean is an toxin.  GIven they both look fairly much like one another and given their botanical name is the same in all of the searches I've done, I don't see how or why they're different.  And I had the same issue trying to figure out which white bean
is the right one to eat.  Fava beans don't agree with me at all.  I wish someone would just
make a bean "pill" and I'd swallow the necessary nutrient IN the bean, whatever that might
be.

As for eating beans...I don't eat them often..  Lentils sometimes, white beans if I make a dip, but I don't like beans very much, never did and all they do is give me a major amount of gas and discomfort.  I never grew up eating beans, except for Heinz baked beans in a can..(and
that would always be when we had hot dogs...YIKES...my awful childhood!) ...  I think if a person doesn't digest something well, there is no point in continuing to eat that food.  I seem to do best on fish, salads, nuts, seeds, and low carb veggies and fruits.  I hardly eat a lot of grains anymore.  My biggest downfall is CORN....popcorn to be specific.  We have one movie
theater in our area that makes air popped organic popcorn.  Can you believe it?  A small
fine-art cinema.  I can't help myself.  They also have herbal tea.  A really nice theater and
I allow myself the great indulgence of popcorn once in awhile.  After, we're only human!

Just wanted you to all know that although I eat a lot of diamond foods, I'm far from perfect!
(and don't think I can be or wanna be)

I didn't think garbanzo beans were on a Warrior's "good food" list.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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ABJoe
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 7:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe
I don't like beans very much, never did and all they do is give me a major amount of gas and discomfort.  I never grew up eating beans,...


I think it take several weeks of eating a small amount of beans every day or every other day for the digestive enzymes or flora to balance for beans...  Every time I haven't eaten beans for a while, then start again, I have some discomfort.  Of course, all of those times were before BTD because since then I eat some beans every week or so and more often (almost daily) since changing to the GTD...




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Mayflowers
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 8:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hey Chloe, I hear ya. I grew up the same way, not eating a lot of beans except baked beans. My mom made baked beans, from a can, lol, and she made lima beans. That was my bean experience. When I became vegetarian, it was a new whole bean world. I made a lot of bean dishes and stews but I never used butter beans..I've never been crazy about lima beans either. Once in awhile it's ok.  I had popcorn last week, it wasn't organic either..must be something in the air huh? Well, we're still BTD compliant! I may never give up corn completely. I like my corn bread sometimes with a good hearty split pea or black bean soup. But I've been pretty compliant. That was the first time I ate corn in awhile.  

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815  -  Thursday, July 31, 2008, 10:34pm
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Captain_Janeway
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 8:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 815
Are butter beans another word for Lima beans?



For the most part I think they are. According to the cooks thesaurus they are often called "butter beans",.

I like speckled butter beans, and somewhere I read they are from the Lima bean family, but according to the cooks thesaurus they are also called brown cow spotted beans.

To me they are more tasty than lima beans. So I don't really know if they are avoids or not. Sometimes I go by how I feel after eating them.

I think limas are avoids for explorers but not really sure about speckled butter beans.

I never really liked limas either,but I do like pintos,black beans and navy beans. Kidney beans were ok on the A nonnie diet, but they gave me way too many issues. So I do not eat them.




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Chloe
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 9:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Now if someone gives me really great authentic Cuban black bean soup, I DO really love that...but I think what I love is the other flavors besides the beans....cilantro and whatever wonderful
ingredients make up black bean soup; onions, red pepper, the seasonings.

Actually, split pea soup is pretty good too.  But see, it would be missing that great smoked flavor from a ham hock...

What on earth flavors split pea soup so it tastes really good, if it's got to be vegetarian?  I
was thinking turkey bacon or turkey sausage.  Mmmm.....getting hungry!

I am so NOT talking about butter beans!  


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Captain_Janeway
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 9:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe
Now if someone gives me really great authentic Cuban black bean soup, I DO really love that...but I think what I love is the other flavors besides the beans....cilantro and whatever wonderful
ingredients make up black bean soup; onions, red pepper, the seasonings.

Actually, split pea soup is pretty good too.  But see, it would be missing that great smoked flavor from a ham hock...

What on earth flavors split pea soup so it tastes really good, if it's got to be vegetarian?  I
was thinking turkey bacon or turkey sausage.  Mmmm.....getting hungry!

I am so NOT talking about butter beans!  


I love black beans in just about anything, but I hear you on that ham hock flavor!!!!



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Mayflowers
Thursday, July 31, 2008, 10:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Chloe
Now if someone gives me really great authentic Cuban black bean soup, I DO really love that...but I think what I love is the other flavors besides the beans....cilantro and whatever wonderful
ingredients make up black bean soup; onions, red pepper, the seasonings.


How about some sherry in split pea soup?, yeah baby! OMG! Pour some Harvey's or Dry Sack in there! Don't need no stinky ham..(I hate ham btw) that's so good..I have a recipe from Mooswood. Best corn bread too.
CUBAN black bean! OMG! I have another recipe of Cuban black bean that you serve with marinated rice..but I'd have to tweak it..because it has vinegar. I LOVE Black Bean soup.
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gulfcoastguy
Friday, August 1, 2008, 4:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Butter beans are the immature form of lima beans. I picked and shelled many bushels of them as a kid. The butter peas is locally thought to be a cross between a cow pea and a lima bean but may in fact actually just be a seperate type of bean. I also grew and shell a lot of them but not nearly as many. No bets on the BTD ratings on butter peas.
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Mayflowers
Friday, August 1, 2008, 4:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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That's the thing gcg. Limas are an avoid but butter beans aren't so I'm confused.
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Ribbit
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Fava beans tear my stomach up.  I only ate them once, and that's enough.  I don't know why they were worse than any other type.

When I eat limas, which isn't often since they're an avoid, they don't bother me.  I don't feel bad.

When I eat garbanzos, which isn't often since they're an avoid, they don't bother me.  I don't feel bad.

Now I realize that just because it's an avoid doesn't necessarily mean it'll make me feel bad......but it sure encourages me to eat them more often!  lol


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

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Andrea AWsec
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Quoted from 815
Limas are an avoid but butter beans aren't so I'm confused.

Immature form must have less harmful (in this case benefcial) lectins then the mature form.  Those mature lectins must resist heat and not break down.

Ma



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"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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Mayflowers
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Quoted Text
however, in the Southern United States the Sieva type are traditionally called butter beans, also otherwise known as the Dixie or Henderson type. In that area, lima beans and butter beans are seen as two distinct types of beans. In


This is a quote from Wikipedia. In another section it says butter beans are lima beans..  

I'll just ask Dr. D Thank you every one for your help.
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purlgirl
Thursday, August 7, 2008, 9:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Todays SF Chronicle has an nice article on cooking fresh beans. She list Limas and Butter beans as 2 dif kinds. Here a link and part of the article.
  
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/08/05/FDC211VB23.DTL

Seasonal Cook: "Fresh from the pod"
Georgeanne Brennan, Special to The Chronicle Wednesday, August 6, 2008

"Last week, a friend gleefully brought me 2 pounds of fresh cannellini beans she had gotten at Monterey Market in Berkeley.
"They're here at last," she cried, handing me the bag. "I'm going home right now and make a fresh bean salad - just lemon, good olive oil, parsley and garlic. I can hardly wait." Off she drove, headed for her kitchen.
Fresh shelling beans, available typically in late July through September, inspire that kind of reaction.
To look at them in the market, you might say, "Oh, those beans look terrible, with those shriveled, damp looking pods." But that's what the Phaseolus cognoscenti look for. The shriveled pod indicates that the bean inside is swollen and plump, full of rich bean flavor, and the dampness indicates the bean is still tender and ready to eat.
A shelling bean is any bean that is grown primarily for the edible seed inside. The pod is not eaten, because it is tough and stringy, unlike snap beans, which are eaten for the pod, with the bean inside barely developed, and sometimes not even visible, as in the meaty haricot vert.
Most of the shelling bean crops are harvested when the pods and beans inside are dry, just before the pod shatters. After harvest, they are stored and sold throughout the year as dry beans. However, in late summer, some of these beans make it to the market in their fresh state - that is, when the edible seed is still moist, and can easily be bitten through. At this point the beans take only minutes to cook, not the hour or more needed for dried beans.
Heirloom varieties
There are hundreds of varieties of shelling beans, many of them heirlooms that have been dropped from the large-scale commercial market. Their names, which are wonderfully romantic, often reflect their place of origin, history or historical event - 'Jacob's Cattle,' 'Hopi Yellow,' 'Seafarer,' 'Nez Perce,' 'Soissons,' 'Cranberry' and 'Soldier.'
Almost any bean destined to be eaten dried can also be eaten fresh, but usually only five or six shelling bean varieties make it to the fresh market, and they are not always easy to find. The best sources for fresh shelling beans are local farmers' markets and markets that focus on local vegetables and fruits (see "Guide to fresh shelling beans").
Among the most available are cranberry beans, of which there are a number of varieties. They're creamy white with maroon marbling, and have cream-colored pods with striations of bright red, dusty red or maroon. When cooked, they turn beige.
Cannellini beans are a European white kidney bean. Flageolet beans are the favorite French white kidney. Italian butter beans are creamy white, round and plump.
Black-eyed peas and their relative, crowder peas, are neither bean nor true pea, but a subtropical legume. They have thin pods that are 8 to 10 inches long. If the pod is still green, so are the peas within, and if the pod is yellowed, the peas are creamy white or pale buff, depending upon variety. Fresh garbanzo beans, also a legume, but not a true bean, are pale green to buff, with a hairy pod."

"Guide to fresh shelling beans
Black-eyed peas.  Pale green- to buff-colored beans, with a black eye at the helix. Pods are green to pale yellow. The flavor is earthy.
Butter beans.  Round, plump beans in a pale yellow pod. Dense with a rich bean flavor.
Cannellini beans.  White kidney-shaped beans, with a pale green to pale yellow pod that may be moist. Delicate bean flavor, not too dense.
Cranberry beans.  Buff with dark red or magenta striping. Pods are pale yellow, with striping ranging from scarlet to burgundy, depending upon variety, and may be slightly moist. Dense, meaty bean flavor. Beans turn beige to brown on cooking.
Garbanzo beans.  Pale green- to pale buff-colored beans. Pods pale green and hairy to buff. For best results fresh, choose the pale green pods. Slightly waxy, crunchy and nutty tasting.
Lima beans.  Plump, flat, pale-green kidney-shaped beans. Pods green to buff, and should show bumps indicating the beans are formed inside. For best results fresh, choose the pale green pods.
Manchurian beans.  Similar to cranberry beans, but larger. "
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Andrea AWsec
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Quoted from 815


This is a quote from Wikipedia. In another section it says butter beans are lima beans..  

I'll just ask Dr. D Thank you every one for your help.
And then tell us



MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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Mayflowers
Thursday, August 7, 2008, 11:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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It's on my list of questions.   If I can sit him down for a couple of minutes...
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