Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  chicory question
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 11 Guests

chicory question  This thread currently has 524 views. Print Print Thread
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Chloe
Thursday, June 26, 2008, 9:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,272
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
Has anyone ever used chicory as a fiber supplement?

It's often called inulin but for one teaspoon of powder, it's got 5 grams of fiber.   Chicory is a superfood for Warriors but I'm not sure if the inulin powder from chicory is as beneficial as eating the whole food.  I was just interested in knowing if anyone had any experience or
knowledge regarding this fiber. I know it's a pre-biotic and supposedly helps with proliferating
good bacteria from probiotics.


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message
Lola
Thursday, June 26, 2008, 9:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,272
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
artichokes also have inulin in their composition...
great liver tonic as well!


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 1 - 13
Lloyd
Friday, June 27, 2008, 1:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,293
Fresh chicory makes a delicious salad if you like strong flavors.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 13
Chloe
Friday, June 27, 2008, 1:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

42% Teacher Rh+ N1, N1b
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 9,272
Gender: Female
Location: Northeast USA
Age: 71
It's kind of bitter, right?  I'll probably like it if it is....


"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 13
Shea
Friday, June 27, 2008, 1:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
I have chicory growing in my pastures. I got very excited about having this wonderful food so close till I picked the leaves and a milky substance came out. Can anyone tell me if this is normal? I drink roasted chicory root in my tea every morning and love it, but would love to try the leaves if anyone can give me the inside scoop on this.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 4 - 13
Lloyd
Friday, June 27, 2008, 1:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,293
Compared to other salad greens, yes. Has a nice 'crunch'. Flavorful dressings are best IMHO, since the chicory will overwhelm plainer dressings/toppings.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 5 - 13
Lloyd
Friday, June 27, 2008, 2:13am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,293
Quoted from 1556
I have chicory growing in my pastures. I got very excited about having this wonderful food so close till I picked the leaves and a milky substance came out. Can anyone tell me if this is normal? I drink roasted chicory root in my tea every morning and love it, but would love to try the leaves if anyone can give me the inside scoop on this.


There are a half dozen or so members of the chicory genus of which only two are cultivated for leaf greens (Wikipedia). Varieties are sometimes called endive, escarole or raddichio are close relatives. Does your plant look like this? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Chicory01.jpg
That is true chicory, a wild variety.

My best guess is that any member of the chicorium genus would be fine for a Hunter. I'm not familiar with milky sap from chicory, sounds more like dandelion, also a member of the Asteraceae family and a number of plants from that family produce a latex or similar sap.


In sum, not real sure what you have there and not enough of an expert to guess.

Here's a pic of chicory that looks like what I'm used to...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/steveperron/2521553632/
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 13
Schluggell
Friday, June 27, 2008, 7:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Permaculture Rh+ INFP Aquarius
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,035
Gender: Male
Location: Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
Age: 45
As a food it is better to harvest the greens early in the year, before the milky sap starts to flow...Roots are dug late Fall. As for maximum Inulin: Haven't pondered that aspect - I would imagine in Fall as well, as it would from the root.
After the greens harvest, if planted in a summer-shady locale cover in a moist layer of new straw to Oversummer for a forced blanched crop in the Fall/Winter.
Do this as well for the Fall-Planted Chicory for Spring.


Herr Schlüggell -- Establish a Garden; Cultivate Community. "To see things in the seed, that is genius. He who obtains has little. He who scatters has much. The way to do is to be." -Lao Tzu
Bruno Manser, Ned Lud, August Sabbe, Richard St. Barbe-Baker, Eddie Koiki Mabo, Masanobu Fukuoka
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 13
Shea
Friday, June 27, 2008, 12:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Yes Lloyd, the picture of the wild chicory is the one that I have, the picture of the one that you eat looks like my endive that I am growing in my garden. Have you ever tried the wild one?

Schluggell, thank you for the information, maybe I did not get to the plants early enough in the year.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 8 - 13
Schluggell
Friday, June 27, 2008, 12:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Permaculture Rh+ INFP Aquarius
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,035
Gender: Male
Location: Ipswich, Suffolk, UK
Age: 45
When it gets down to it - Given a decently established garden, and proper Veg. varieties for your conditions...Spring is not THE time to plant. When done right, Fall is really the time to do most things.
Spring Time is a modern fallacy by Seed Merchants and their Annual Varieties to be pushed on us.


Herr Schlüggell -- Establish a Garden; Cultivate Community. "To see things in the seed, that is genius. He who obtains has little. He who scatters has much. The way to do is to be." -Lao Tzu
Bruno Manser, Ned Lud, August Sabbe, Richard St. Barbe-Baker, Eddie Koiki Mabo, Masanobu Fukuoka
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 13
Lloyd
Friday, June 27, 2008, 2:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,293
Quoted from 1556
Yes Lloyd, the picture of the wild chicory is the one that I have, the picture of the one that you eat looks like my endive that I am growing in my garden. Have you ever tried the wild one?


No, not yet! Although some of the wild chicory looks somewhat similar to dandelion, so there is a real chance that I have gotten some in my foraging.  

Your endive and the wild chicory are very close relatives.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 13
Lloyd
Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 2:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,293
Found this on the web, there are probably other pages worth looking at as well: http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Chicory.html

Noticed some wild chicory today while walking and picked a few leaves. Pretty strong this time of the year! Probably better in cooked dishes as the leaves were fairly tough in that mature a plant, as well as bitter/sour. The leaves are best eaten before flowering (still tender), the roots best used after the flowers are gone. At least according to another web site. Also, like dandelion, the flowers are edible. I'll pick a few tommorow.  
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 13
eh
Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 2:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Sam Dan
Posts: 752
This chicory is growing wild in my backyard. It has naturalised forming a lawn at this time of year (winter in Australia). When it flowers it forms a spectacular hedge of blue wildflowers. It is at its best boiled and eaten in a warm salad soon after it is picked, especially during late winter/spring. It remains bitter even after boiling but I find it delicious. (More bitter than dandelions.)  It is an excellent source of fibre. Very moving.



Revision History (1 edits)
eh  -  Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 2:56am
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 13
Maria Giovanna
Tuesday, July 1, 2008, 7:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher
Kyosha Nim
Language Expert
Posts: 1,859
Gender: Female
Location: Italy
Age: 53
Hi Eh,
I love the tender green leaves of chicory with mozzarella or other fresh cheeses, a bit of salt and olive oil and fresh grounded pepper if compliant ! As a teacher I should forget it now.
Maria Giovanna


INTJ Italy celiac��
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 13
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  chicory question

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread