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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  help with understanding the sea veggies, please
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help with understanding the sea veggies, please  This thread currently has 484 views. Print Print Thread
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Chanur
Friday, March 28, 2008, 9:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I am trying to make sense of the sea vegetables.

I know which ones to use, and how to use them, for the most part, from a culinary aspect, but as to knowing what they really are - I am totally confused.

When I looked for information on kelp it says it is a sea vegetable. When I looked at wakame it said it is a type of kelp, but the GT3 book lists them as two separate superfoods. I have nori and kombu in my pantry. Are they kelp? Something else entirely?  

Thanks!
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Lloyd
Friday, March 28, 2008, 11:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes, wakame is one of the kelps, which is quite a large group (Laminariales). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelp Different kelps may have somewhat different characteristics, wakame is noted for fucoxanthins. Kelp in general have good levels of fucoidans. Kombu is also a kelp. Nori and bladderwrack are not. Carrageen is also not a kelp (Irish moss).

Seaweed in general is a "sea vegetable" i.e. sea vegetable being the generic term for oceanic vegetation.
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Chanur
Saturday, March 29, 2008, 2:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd
Yes, wakame is one of the kelps, which is quite a large group (Laminariales). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelp Different kelps may have somewhat different characteristics, wakame is noted for fucoxanthins. Kelp in general have good levels of fucoidans. Kombu is also a kelp.


Since the book lists kelp and wakame separately on the Live Foods list (pg.229) does this mean that all kelp are superfoods with wakame listed separately to call attention to it because perhaps it's an especially good type of kelp for GT3's?    And kombu, being a type of kelp, is a superfood for GT3's?

Quoted from Lloyd
Nori and bladderwrack are not...Seaweed in general is a "sea vegetable" i.e. sea vegetable being the generic term for oceanic vegetation.


So I should consider nori, which is an alga if I remember correctly, to be a neutral because it is unlisted (like spirulina as opposed to agar which is listed as an avoid on pg. 229). Correct?

Quoted from Lloyd
Carrageen is also not a kelp (Irish moss).


Then why is Irish moss listed as a GT3 Superfood with Diamond (pg.229) and then Carrageen as a GT3 Toxin (pg. 232)? Typo? Value changes with different forms/processing so both values are correct?  

BTW, Lloyd, thanks for helping me with this!  

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Chanur  -  Saturday, March 29, 2008, 4:08pm
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Lloyd
Saturday, March 29, 2008, 9:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chanur


Since the book lists kelp and wakame separately on the Live Foods list (pg.229) does this mean that all kelp are superfoods with wakame listed separately to call attention to it because perhaps it's an especially good type of kelp for GT3's?    And kombu, being a type of kelp, is a superfood for GT3's?


I suspect there is a seperate listing because seperate nutritional data is available for wakame and 'generic' kelp. I would not read anything else into it, although it is possible there is something more valuable about wakame. FWIW I have found generic kelp to often be kombu. Yes, kombu would be a GT3 superfood if kelp is a GT3 superfood.

Quoted from Chanur

So I should consider nori, which is an alga if I remember correctly, to be a neutral because it is unlisted (like spirulina as opposed to agar which is listed as an avoid on pg. 229). Correct?


That would be my interpretation.


Quoted from Chanur

Then why is Irish moss listed as a GT3 Superfood with Diamond (pg.229) and then Carrageen as a GT3 Toxin (pg. 232)? Typo? Value changes with different forms/processing so both values are correct?  

BTW, Lloyd, thanks for helping me with this!  


No problem Chanur. The listing on p 232 is for the product carrageenan, a derivative of carrageen. One might think of the difference as somewhat analagous to sugar and beets, where beets are a diamond food and sugar, a derivative, is an avoid.

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funkymuse
Thursday, April 10, 2008, 10:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Wow.. that's too bad about Nori.  I just had a great wrap.

Tuna/Salmon salad mixture made with homemade mayo, sesame sprinkles, kelp sprinkles wrapped in romaine and then a nori wrap. Delicious!

Also how do you use Wakame?  I notice it is used in Miso which I cannot have being a Hunter.

and some other ways to use Kelp would be great too.

Thanks all!
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Kristin
Thursday, April 10, 2008, 11:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 1323


Also how do you use Wakame?  I notice it is used in Miso which I cannot have being a Hunter.

and some other ways to use Kelp would be great too.

Thanks all!


I used to love love love!!! miso soup with wakame... one of the few avoids that I still miss after all these years.

An old macrobiotic standby was to put a piece of kombu (type of kelp) in the pot when cooking up a batch of beans for soup (or whatever) and then cutting up the kombu when done and using the bean cooking water as soup stock and adding the cooked kombu to the soup. Kombu is very strong tasting though... but it was supposed to aid with digesting the beans. I am thinking of doing this with wakame... a more delicate sea vegetable that might just dissolve in the pot but that would be ok too....


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funkymuse
Saturday, June 28, 2008, 8:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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So I added the big thick strips of Kombu to the Chili I made recently and it softened up and I assume it did it's thing even though I didn't know how long to cook the sauce with the Kombu in it to get the full affect - anyone know?

Also afterwards does one cut up the Kombu and add it back to the soup and/or stew or does one disgard it?  
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Lola
Saturday, June 28, 2008, 9:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I like eating it......depends on taste and individuality.


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Brighid45
Saturday, June 28, 2008, 11:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I always cut up the kombu and ate it with the beans . . . I like the taste of it but some people don't, as Kristin mentioned it is rather strong-tasting.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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Lloyd
Saturday, June 28, 2008, 11:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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In the beginning I used large chunks to cook with beans. Since it would cook for a long time it was fine, as it would get quite tender.

Now I usually cut into thin strips or small pieces before cooking. Kombu tends to need a half hour or so at boiling unless you prefer it to be a little chewy (especially thicker pieces). Wakame only needs to soak for 15 minutes or cook for 5 minutes to be tender.

Both have a noticeable flavor. If you are going to discard, it is easier to fish out larger pieces. My view is that it's extra fiber as well as whatever nutrition didn't leach into the cooking and can be absorbed.
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funkymuse
Sunday, June 29, 2008, 1:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Lloyd
In the beginning I used large chunks to cook with beans. Since it would cook for a long time it was fine, as it would get quite tender.

Now I usually cut into thin strips or small pieces before cooking. Kombu tends to need a half hour or so at boiling unless you prefer it to be a little chewy (especially thicker pieces). Wakame only needs to soak for 15 minutes or cook for 5 minutes to be tender.

Both have a noticeable flavor. If you are going to discard, it is easier to fish out larger pieces. My view is that it's extra fiber as well as whatever nutrition didn't leach into the cooking and can be absorbed.


Thanks for this info. Lloyd... I was hoping you'd chime in!

What type of flavor like the ocean? I know the Kelp sprinkles we use smell alot like the ocean... but don't quite taste like that since they are only sprinkles.
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Lloyd
Sunday, June 29, 2008, 3:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My memories of getting a mouth full of ocean water are not the same as the taste of kelp. Suggest you do a little experiment. Take a small piece of kelp and keep it in your mouth until it is pliable enough to chew without 'crunching' it. Then gently chew/suck on it for a bit. You will then know the flavor.
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  help with understanding the sea veggies, please

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