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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Cooking Okra... and  what about Artichokes?
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Cooking Okra... and  what about Artichokes?  This thread currently has 1,772 views. Print Print Thread
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funkymuse
Monday, March 24, 2008, 2:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Well I've added Asparagus and  Rutabaga and Turnips to the diet since going on the  GTD... and still am working to add more of the super vegies.  

I'm ready to try a couple of new ones.

So... how do you cook this Okra and how does one eat Artichokes?  I see that the hearts come packed in water, so that's good for Hunters but what does one do with them?  Also are we supposed to be eating other parts of the  Artichoke?  

Some of the other vegi's on the Hunter list are completely foreign and I have no idea where to buy them.  Maybe at this summers farmers market some will appear...

Any advice on Okra and Artichokes would be great!
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accidental_chef
Monday, March 24, 2008, 4:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Wash and completely dry Okra before cooking. Water makes it "phelgmy" .

Cut the head and trim the tail. Cut rounds evenly not too thinly. You can also cut them slantingly.

Chop onions & garlic.

Heat oil, add onions and saute. Then add garlic. Once fragrant, add chopped/sliced okra.

Add turmeric, chilli powder, salt to taste and mix well. Cover and reduce flame to low.

Stir once in a while but keep the lid on till just cooked. If the "phlegm" is still there, then remove the lid and gently stir for a minute or two.

Once done you can add crushed cumin and a teaspoon of ghee as garnishing.



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Drea
Monday, March 24, 2008, 5:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I love okra, although I've never eaten it fresh...I buy it canned or frozen. If frozen, I heat up a cast iron skillet with some ghee and cook the frozen okra over med high heat until heated through. Add sea salt and voila.

Artichokes are best when steamed; either traditionally or in a pressure cooker. I wash then and cut off the stem and steam until the leaves pull easily from the whole. Don't forget to eat the heart!


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Lola
Monday, March 24, 2008, 5:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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the heart is the treasure hidden within!!


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Maria Giovanna
Monday, March 24, 2008, 1:39pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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In Italy, we get artichokes ready in this way; cut the dark leaves and the edges of the others, peel the stem and cook the big artichoke bud  in a pan with oil or/and ghee, parsley and garlic as you like. Mint is a good alternative to parsley. In a hurry you cut the larger buds in quarters and the smallest in half  and have them ready in 15 minutes. Enjoy !
Maria Giovanna


INTJ Italy celiac��
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JJR
Monday, March 24, 2008, 5:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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When I cook frozen okra it's just a medium low heat. Until they are dry and warmed / cooked through.  It will be a soggy mess until then.  I may add sea salt.  I haven't added anything yet because my wife doesn't like mixing stuff like that yet.


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cindyt
Monday, March 24, 2008, 5:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Every summer I grow organic okra and basil, in pots.  I cut up the okra and sautee it in olive oil, adding chopped basil and a little salt near the end of cooking.  I love it that way.  I also like it in soups and veggie mixes, and the slime doesn't bother me.
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funkymuse
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 12:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Drea
I love okra, although I've never eaten it fresh...I buy it canned or frozen. If frozen, I heat up a cast iron skillet with some ghee and cook the frozen okra over med high heat until heated through. Add sea salt and voila.

Artichokes are best when steamed; either traditionally or in a pressure cooker. I wash then and cut off the stem and steam until the leaves pull easily from the whole. Don't forget to eat the heart!


Hi Drea.. how do you cook it if it's canned?  The same way?  I could only find canned here on the Island...  

Also I found organic Artichokes at the store today but the leaves had brown spots on the outside.  How does one know if this is fresh and ok?  What should a good artichokes look like?

For now we have a can of the hearts in water that I guess I will add to a salad...   What else could I do with these canned hearts?
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Drea
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 1:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ooh, canned artichoke hearts are great right out of the can or on a salad. I cook canned okra the same way (just not as long).


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Ribbit
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 1:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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No, no, no, y'all.  Do it the Southern way.  You can buy frozen okra already sliced up.  Thaw it out (yes, it will be a gummy mess), toss it with rice flour or millet flour, and fry it in ghee or olive oil till it's brown and crunchy.  Salt lightly if desired.  It's really best to use fresh okra, but obviously it's hard to find (being a native of Africa and only growing in the south).  You can steam it, but if you're going to steam it, leave the tops on or it will get gummy.  Also, if the okra is young, you don't have to cut either end off.  Just slice it all up.


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funkymuse
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 4:03am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Drea
Ooh, canned artichoke hearts are great right out of the can or on a salad. I cook canned okra the same way (just not as long).


My issue is that it tastes like it's marinated.  It tastes like the  citric Acid and Ascorbic acid they use in the water in the can...

I'm sure the frozen variety doesn't taste like that..  

I can't imagine that fresh okra tastes marinated.  I couldn't tell what it really tasted like after we cooked it in ghee and salt.  It just tasted like the citric acid water it came in.

I'm thinking that the canned artichoke hearts must taste the same way as they are canned in the same ingredients.

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Lola
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 4:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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citric Acid and Ascorbic acid come in everything canned around here!
hope you can find a reliable source which doesn t use this...


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
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Drea
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 4:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I know what you are talking about (taste-wise). I don't mind it. Yes, the canned artichokes do taste the same. Look for frozen (sliced) okra in the frozen foods section of your supermarket. Frozen okra tastes better than canned, for sure, and I've never tried cooking fresh.

Ribbit's suggestion for okra sounds good, too.


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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funkymuse
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 4:19am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Unfortunately this store didn't have frozen okra.  When i get to the mainland this friday... i'll go by a bigger supermarket and pick some up.

and yes... wow.. roll in flour and fry!!!
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funkymuse
Thursday, March 27, 2008, 11:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Anybody try the okra and black eyed pea recipe in Recipe Central?
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Drea
Friday, March 28, 2008, 12:37am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from 1323
Anybody try the okra and black eyed pea recipe in Recipe Central?


No, but now you've piqued my interest!


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Spring
Monday, March 31, 2008, 1:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from cindyt
Every summer I grow organic okra and basil, in pots.  I cut up the okra and sautee it in olive oil, adding chopped basil and a little salt near the end of cooking.  I love it that way.  I also like it in soups and veggie mixes, and the slime doesn't bother me.


Would you mind giving us some hints about growing it in pots? I've grown rows of it in my former garden but never in pots. In fact, I've heard of a lot of veggies grown in pots but never okra! What a great idea.

Oh, if folks don't like "slime," there are some recipes, besides the common dusting with compliant meal or flour and frying in a bit of oil, that get around some of that. I have at least two that I could dig up. One calls for green tomatoes, onions, etc., that is delicious, but I can't have it at present!   My mother used to cook whole okra on top of peas, string beans, butterbeans, limas, and other veggies in her pressure cooker. It made them much tastier and the okra was not so slimy cooked that way. Of course, the veggies were never stirred until the okra was carefully transferred to a separate dish. Boiling in a regular pot does the same thing except you can't stir the veggies at all until the okra is cooked and removed.
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Ribbit
Monday, March 31, 2008, 1:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Somehow I can't imagine growing okra in pots.  They're not small plants.  And one plant doesn't produce all that many pods.  So you'd need like four dozen pots with one plant each to even get enough okra to enjoy it a couple of times a week all summer long.  If there's another way to do it, please tell.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Spring
Monday, March 31, 2008, 5:23am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Ribbit
Somehow I can't imagine growing okra in pots.  They're not small plants.  And one plant doesn't produce all that many pods.  So you'd need like four dozen pots with one plant each to even get enough okra to enjoy it a couple of times a week all summer long.  If there's another way to do it, please tell.


Yes, maybe there is a type of okra that we haven't tried yet! I'm all "ears!" I love okra! And it is so easy to grow, and none of these critters around here have developed a liking for it so far, thank goodness.
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Rebecca_C
Monday, March 31, 2008, 10:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I love okra roasted with the other veggies.  It goes in the oven along with the pumpkin & sweet potato.  Wash and dry it well then put it in the oven at around 180 for as long as the other veggies take (chopped up in smaller chunks).


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Ribbit
Monday, March 31, 2008, 1:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from 2330


none of these critters around here have developed a liking for it so far, thank goodness.


Yeeeah.  The squirrels eat my tomatoes (well, back when I grew them), and we have to race them for the strawberries.  The little thieves.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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funkymuse
Monday, March 31, 2008, 2:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Rebecca_C
I love okra roasted with the other veggies.  It goes in the oven along with the pumpkin & sweet potato.  Wash and dry it well then put it in the oven at around 180 for as long as the other veggies take (chopped up in smaller chunks).


Do you put any spices or anything on it?  (sauce)?
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Rebecca_C
Monday, March 31, 2008, 11:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Just some salt, but I have to admit, I do like things quite plain. Occassionally might make up some of Edna's Nutritional Yeast spread to have with them, but other than that, generally plain.  They usually roast up to be quite crunchy.


Mum to two gorgeous Alaskan Malamutes named Omen and Anoki
Married to a B Nomad
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Ribbit
Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Will you remind us of the recipe?


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Mayflowers
Tuesday, April 1, 2008, 12:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Maria Giovanna
In Italy, we get artichokes ready in this way; cut the dark leaves and the edges of the others, peel the stem and cook the big artichoke bud  in a pan with oil or/and ghee, parsley and garlic as you like. Mint is a good alternative to parsley. In a hurry you cut the larger buds in quarters and the smallest in half  and have them ready in 15 minutes. Enjoy !
Maria Giovanna


Maria,
My mother, who was Calabrese would cut off the tops, trip the sharp ends off, trim off the stem, spread the leaves Rinse and put them in a pot. She then sprinkled olive oil all over them, and then sprinkle them with Italian bread crumbs, salt and pepper, cover and cook for about 30-40 mins until you can easily pull out a leaf.

Since I can't have bread crumbs,   I use evoo and lemon juice. Artichokes are my favorite vegetable..must be an Italian thing..
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