Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Which Genotype when one leg is longer???
Users Browsing Forum
No Members and 7 Guests

Which Genotype when one leg is longer???  This thread currently has 849 views. Print Print Thread
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Captain_Janeway
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 8:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

47% Explorer/Super Taster
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,403
Gender: Female
Location: USA
Age: 43
My father has been told by his chiropractor that his left leg is slightly longer than the other. How can you possibly determine which genotype you are if the longer leg would make a difference between torso and leg length? What about amputees?


Rh Neg, Le(a+b-), NN, Fy(a-b+)

INTP/INTJ at work
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message
Dr. D
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 9:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Peter D'Adamo
Kwan Jhang Nim
Posts: 4,162
Gender: Male
Location: Connecticut
Age: 58
Use what you have to get a short list of possibilities, then strength test.


A whole system is a living system is a learning system.’ -Stewart Brand
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 14
Carol the Dabbler
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 9:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,774
Gender: Female
Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69
On page 78 of the book (under "Teeth Patterns"), Dr. D says, "Of course, if you've had dental work done on any of the teeth we're interested in, you won't be able to answer these questions....  Don't worry, there are plenty of other questions!"

Admittedly, leg measurements are more pivotal to determining one's GenoType than tooth patterns are.  But I believe that the same principle would apply -- use whatever information you've got, and find the best fit.

Believe it or not, I came to this conclusion several nights ago, while I was falling asleep.  I'm not an amputee, I just like to take everything into consideration!


Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 14
Carol the Dabbler
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 9:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,774
Gender: Female
Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69
Dr. D and I double-posted there.

*Whew!*  Looks like I guessed right!  


Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 14
Captain_Janeway
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 10:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

47% Explorer/Super Taster
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,403
Gender: Female
Location: USA
Age: 43
I think it will be a toss up between teacher or explorer. He is type A, but I'm not sure about his teeth,but based on his health,which is exceptionally good for his age only one person in his family has had cancer and that type of cancer was exceptionally rare.


Rh Neg, Le(a+b-), NN, Fy(a-b+)

INTP/INTJ at work
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 4 - 14
Dr. Natalie Colicci
Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 11:11pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from Captain_Janeway
My father has been told by his chiropractor that his left leg is slightly longer than the other. How can you possibly determine which genotype you are if the longer leg would make a difference between torso and leg length? What about amputees?


A agree with Dr. D. that you should use the information that you have and strength test from there.  

What could also be considered in a situation where one leg is shorter than the other, is whether the shortness is due to an anatomical short leg or a functional short leg.  Meaning, is the leg shorter because it is an asymmetry, or, for example, is it shorter because the pelvis has a tilt.  In the later scenario, I would measure the leg that seems longer (although in reality it isn't longer, just seems so due to the tilted pelvis).  The Chiropractor should be able to answer this question for your father.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 5 - 14
Don
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 3:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
Gender: Male
Location: North Alabama
Age: 58
Quoted from Carol the Dabbler
On page 78 of the book (under "Teeth Patterns"), Dr. D says, "Of course, if you've had dental work done on any of the teeth we're interested in, you won't be able to answer these questions....  Don't worry, there are plenty of other questions!"

Admittedly, leg measurements are more pivotal to determining one's GenoType than tooth patterns are.  But I believe that the same principle would apply -- use whatever information you've got, and find the best fit.

Believe it or not, I came to this conclusion several nights ago, while I was falling asleep.  I'm not an amputee, I just like to take everything into consideration!

Reread page 95 and remember that your Genotype is 100% confirmed based on the Advanced GenoType Calculator tables if you have your blood type, Rh, secretor status and your torso, leg, and finger length measurements.

You don't need the other measurements and data points to determine your GT. All they will do is help you determine how well you match the typical characteristics of your GT.

For example, If I used strength testing to determine my GT after using the advanced GT calculator tables. I would be a different GT. It doesn't work that way so don't do it.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 6 - 14
Melissa_J
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 4:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator & Blogger
Posts: 5,045
Gender: Female
Location: Utah, USA
Age: 39
So his height changes, depending on which leg he's standing on, and that's enough difference to skew the torso/leg measurement? Everyone I know who has gone to a chiropractor has been told one leg is longer than the other, but the difference is usually slight.

If it's more than a slight difference, upon measuring, as you said, then go with Dr. D.'s advice to strength test it.  

My sister is missing one vertebra, and the set of ribs that would normally come with it.  Just born that way.  Her torso was still longer than her legs, so we didn't have to think too much about it.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.

Revision History (3 edits)
Melissa_J  -  Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 8:15am
Melissa_J  -  Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 8:13am
Melissa_J  -  Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 8:11am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 14
Captain_Janeway
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 10:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

47% Explorer/Super Taster
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,403
Gender: Female
Location: USA
Age: 43
Quoted from 12


A agree with Dr. D. that you should use the information that you have and strength test from there.  

What could also be considered in a situation where one leg is shorter than the other, is whether the shortness is due to an anatomical short leg or a functional short leg.  Meaning, is the leg shorter because it is an asymmetry, or, for example, is it shorter because the pelvis has a tilt.  In the later scenario, I would measure the leg that seems longer (although in reality it isn't longer, just seems so due to the tilted pelvis).  The Chiropractor should be able to answer this question for your father.


Thanks, that really does help!!


Rh Neg, Le(a+b-), NN, Fy(a-b+)

INTP/INTJ at work
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 8 - 14
Captain_Janeway
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 11:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

47% Explorer/Super Taster
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,403
Gender: Female
Location: USA
Age: 43
Quoted from Melissa_J
So his height changes, depending on which leg he's standing on, and that's enough difference to skew the torso/leg measurement? Everyone I know who has gone to a chiropractor has been told one leg is longer than the other, but the difference is usually slight.

If it's more than a slight difference, upon measuring, as you said, then go with Dr. D.'s advice to strength test it.  

My sister is missing one vertebra, and the set of ribs that would normally come with it.  Just born that way.  Her torso was still longer than her legs, so we didn't have to think too much about it.


It may not be enough to make a significant difference for his torso to leg ratio,but he has problems with arthritis and neuropathy.He is not a diabetic,as neuropathy usually affects diabetics at some time, but a different doctor has basically told him this is "how he is wired".




Rh Neg, Le(a+b-), NN, Fy(a-b+)

INTP/INTJ at work
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 14
Lloyd
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 1:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,295
Quoted from Captain_Janeway


It may not be enough to make a significant difference for his torso to leg ratio,but he has problems with arthritis and neuropathy.


The arthritis could affect the finger measurement. If you are unable to get a 'clean' measurment then it falls back to the strength test again.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 14
Dr. D
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 11:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Peter D'Adamo
Kwan Jhang Nim
Posts: 4,162
Gender: Male
Location: Connecticut
Age: 58
The idea of the strength testing section was to provide a separate, independent method which could also be used in these types of situations.

By the way, any variation is fine (I like Lloyd's toilet seat idea the best, though it might prove hard to do in the clinic!) with torso-leg measurements, but the method given in the book is the standardized way to determine the 'cormic index' (seated to standing height ratio), so double check your results against the standardized method as well.


A whole system is a living system is a learning system.’ -Stewart Brand
Logged
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 14
TJ
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 4:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

54% Nomad
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,486
Gender: Male
Location: Midvale, UT, USA
Age: 39
Quoted from 12
What could also be considered in a situation where one leg is shorter than the other, is whether the shortness is due to an anatomical short leg or a functional short leg.  Meaning, is the leg shorter because it is an asymmetry, or, for example, is it shorter because the pelvis has a tilt.


My right leg is about 3/8-1/2" shorter.  Naturally, this caused my pelvis to tilt down on the right side, and the tilt is what caused most of my back pain.  My spinal column had a sort of "S" curve when viewed from the front, but after a lot of adjustment/therapy, and wearing a heel lift, it has straightened out.  Your pelvis would only be naturally tilted if your spine was deformed!

Looking at my legs, it seems that the missing length is coming from my upper leg, but I haven't measured to verify.  In my case, I'd still be a Nomad either way!

I don't quite understand how you could have a "functional short leg" as you describe.  If both legs were identical in leg from hip joint to heel, and the pelvis was symmetrical, if the pelvis tilted one way, eventually the extra weight from walking and standing would push the lower side up, right?
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 14
Melissa_J
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 8:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Hunter
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator & Blogger
Posts: 5,045
Gender: Female
Location: Utah, USA
Age: 39
Osteoarthritis can also cause the lower back to tilt, turning the pelvis.  That's kind of what I had in '98, though the surgeon had to go into a surgery before he could completely explain it to me... it ended up resolving with walking and BTD, and no more jogging.  My doctor sent me to the surgeon to get a heel lift, because he thought one leg was shorter, but that actually wasn't the issue.


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 14
Dr. Natalie Colicci
Friday, January 11, 2008, 1:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
Guest User
Quoted from TJ


...Your pelvis would only be naturally tilted if your spine was deformed!

Looking at my legs, it seems that the missing length is coming from my upper leg, but I haven't measured to verify.  In my case, I'd still be a Nomad either way!

I don't quite understand how you could have a "functional short leg" as you describe.  If both legs were identical in leg from hip joint to heel, and the pelvis was symmetrical, if the pelvis tilted one way, eventually the extra weight from walking and standing would push the lower side up, right?


An anatomical short leg is a leg that is literally shorter than the other.  You are born this way.  You are correct in saying that both a spinal curvature and this shorter leg could affect the tilt of a pelvis.  However, a functional short leg is where the legs are actually of equal length, but due to some functional issue it causes one to appear shorter than the other.  This functional issue usually is caused by the pelvis tilting.  The pelvic tilt could be caused simply by pulling your neck or back out, or even wearing high heels.  Say for instance the pelvis was caused to have a posterior tilt on the left.  This posterior tilt would take the entire hip joint with it, lifting it up and posterior.  This would cause the left leg to appear shorter than the right leg.  Fairly simple adjustments can fix this problem.
Logged
E-mail E-mail Reply: 14 - 14
1 Pages 1 Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  Which Genotype when one leg is longer???

Thread Rating
There is currently no rating for this thread