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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  GT3 Teachers discussion...ch-ch-changes :-)
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GT3 Teachers discussion...ch-ch-changes :-)  This thread currently has 5,193 views. Print Print Thread
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Carol the Dabbler
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 1:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
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Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69
Quoted from Gumby
I think the goat cheese is ok too, based on the fact that in the Typebase here it is listed seperately from goat milk with differences in the ratings for each type.



Right -- "goat cheese" isn't listed as either a superfood or a toxin for Teachers, so it must be a Neutral for us.

Just in case anyone's wondering why I was making all those assumptions earlier about cheese made from goat milk, when "goat cheese" is presumably listed as a Neutral for Teachers on the GenoType web site, here's why.  If you'll read the page for "goat cheese" on Typebase, you'll see that it's not just any cheese that happens to be made from goat milk -- it's a specific type of cheese.  Here in the U.S.A., it's generally called simply "goat cheese" (presumably because it was the only type of goat-milk cheese available in fancy cheese stores at one time); in France it's known as "chevre" (which is, I believe, French for "goat").

So if "goat cheese" is a Neutral for us, that doesn't mean that  we can eat, for example, cheddar cheese if it's made from goat milk.  Cheddar cheese is presumably still cheddar cheese.


Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor
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Oonu
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 1:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+, Teacher
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 201
Gender: Female
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Age: 51
I'm feeling a bit out of place...
Can someone confirm for me that I am a teacher?

Longer torso
Longer Upper-leg
Longer Ring Fingers on both hands
Blood type A+ Secretor
Mesomorphic
High Hip-waist ratio
Medium  headed

Any ideas?
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Chanur
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 3:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI'd from GT3 to GT6
Ee Dan
Posts: 845
Gender: Female
Location: Pacific NW, USA
Yes, you definitely sound like a Teacher to me! Welcome to the group!

Your torso, leg, and finger measurements combined with your BTD info. always trump /over-rule the "strength-test" results. (see pg. 97, top of page, very first paragraph).

I hope that helps you feel better about what your result interpretations.
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Gumby
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 4:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Ee Dan
Posts: 655
Gender: Female
Location: BC Canada
Age: 49
Yup Oonu, you are a teacher!  I second the welcome .  

Us A+secretors can only be one of two, either a teacher or a warrior.  Type A explorers are either rh- or nonnies or both.


Embracing my A-ness!    (Ok, that is waaaay better in print than it is out loud!      )

A+Sec Teacher follwing GT3/SWAMI diet
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Devora
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 7:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 328
Gender: Female
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
Age: 47
Carol,

I also feel that way about fruit!  I have written abou this in another thread (Transitioning from the BTD to the GTD)

I bought persimmons, blackcurrants, kiwi, grapefuit and I even found QUINCE JUICE!!!

It is definitely hard to stick to the fruit list.  Not to mention adding all those grains back in.  (See other thread.)


Devora
On the BTD since April 1999
Teacher
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Olerica
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 3:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Oonu!  Welcome!

Another happy day for this Teacher!  My breakfasts of late have been smoothies made with Greek yogurt, grapefruit juice, raspberries, blueberries and (pasturized*) egg white.  OMG!  It's like the best lassi ever!  

I made my steam fry last night with carrot, onion, broccoli, ground turkey meat, ginger, garlic, tamari and honey... with a little sriracha (ok, it's an avoid...but I only use a few drops) and my favorite brown rice.  OMG!  It was SOOOOO good.

Today's lunch is ground turkey (cooked crumbly) with 1/2 and onion - caramelized, broccoli and carrot with a cheddar cheese sauce made with a ghee/oat flour rouix and turkey broth.  I tasted some last night and it was SO awesome!!!

Tonight is ostrich burgers with roasted beets and squash and onions (I like me cooked onion) and a small romaine salad.  (The left overs will be lunch tomorrow with some brown rice, peccorino and maybe scrambled eggs)

Darn it... I'm having so much fun with this, after my initial panic!

BTW: Does anyone know why the difference in status between mutton and lamb?  I never see mutton in the grocery (DH is a B so I cook lamb often - even if I don't eat it)


*I don't know how I feel about pasturization, but I'm eating these bad boys raw all the while trying to get pregnant - and in the chance that I am now, I don't want to be messing that up with raw egg issues.


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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Joy
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Olerica,

How do you steam fry the ingredients?  It sounds really good.  I've used all those ingredients separately or in some combo but not all together.

Appreciate your sharing this with us.



Joy
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Olerica
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 7:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Quoted from Joy
Olerica,
How do you steam fry the ingredients?  It sounds really good.  I've used all those ingredients separately or in some combo but not all together.

Appreciate your sharing this with us.Joy


Joy - My pleasure!  After the 'restrictivness' of the A Secretor diet (where I felt I personally needed more protein) I'm just flying around happy about what feels to me of greater 'freedom'... I'm happy to help and share.

When I cook, I go by feel so ammounts are subjective and relative.  Perhaps you like things saltier or sweeter or whatever... cooking is NOT baking and there is quite a bit of fluidity to it.  That said, this is my guestimate recipe for steam-frying.  BTW: Steam frying came about when I wanted to do a stirfry but didn't have the 1) hot enough stove 2) wok - I use a large skillet and 3) wanted to drastically reduce the oil/fat in cooking.

Portions for 3 meals:
First:
1 cup brown rice, 2 1/2 cups water, 2-3 cloves of garlic.  Bring to a boil then reduce temp to simmer for 45 minutes or until your desired done-ness.

Next:
1/2 an onion, small dice
10 oz ground turkey (You can use 99% fat free or 97% fat free or tenderloins cut into small chunks.  You can also use tofu, chicken or whatever protein - maybe this would be good with ground ostrich that I saw on the internet last night)
1/2 teaspoon olive oil or other compliant oil (I'm using up my toasted sessame oil - can you see the tears in my eyes?)  

Soften the onion in the oil.  When onion is translucent, add the turkey and as it's cooking break it into smallish chunks.

With a fine grater (microplane works wonderfully) grate 3 large (6 small) cloves of garlic into the turkey/onion mixture and a 1" piece of ginger (if you can't smell the ginger over the garlic, add more ginger).  If you can find fresh lemongrass grate this in too, if not it's ok.  If you have 5 spice powder add 1/2 teaspoon now.

When the turkey is cooked through, add 1 1/2 cups frozen broccoli (because I can't be bothered to trim broccoli) and toss to the bottom.  You can put a cover on the mixture at this point if you want to speed up the process, but if your rice isn't cooking fast enough, don't.

While the broccoli is coming up to temperature, cut 1 large or 2 smaller carrots into bite size peices - you'll want just over a cup of carrots and when cut, put into the onion/turkey/broccoli pan, but leave this on top.  (Stir the pan before adding carrot).

Once the carrot is in, trim up a good handful of snow peas, or cut up some fennel bulb to resemble celery or get the package of peas you have in the freezer out (if the peas are frozen into a block and a light tap does not free them, put them into the onion/turkey/broccoli/carrot mixture now, if not WAIT).

When the rice is done, add the fresh peas and/or fennel and/or loosely frozen peas and replace cover until after you dish out rice.  Once rice is dished, toss and dish veggie/turkey mixture.  Sprinkle with some tamari, a few squirts of honey and a few drops of the non-compliant Sriracha sauce (sorry, it just makes it SO good!!!)  Voila!  Dinner and lunch the next day!


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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Joy
Wednesday, January 9, 2008, 9:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher
Sam Dan
Posts: 1,332
Gender: Female
Location: Southwest Florida
Olerica,

Thanks for the recipe.  It sure sounds delicious and nutritious.

Please tell us what the (I know, avoid) Sriracha sauce is.  Just for informational purposes, of course!


Joy
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purlgirl
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 5:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher, non-taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,034
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Location: Northern CA, USA
Age: 69
Olerica and all new one  welcome !

I just reread the whole thread. Feel like I'm slowly getting the hang of these changes.

? What is Sriracha Sauce?
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Devora
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 1:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 328
Gender: Female
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
Age: 47
I found some fresh quinces today> I am ready to make Quince crumble with currants.  I just don't know if the quinces are ripe!  

I think this teacher diet is rather exotic!


Devora
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Teacher
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Devora
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 1:53pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Teacher
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 328
Gender: Female
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
Age: 47
Quince is frost hardy and requires a cold period below 7 °C to flower properly. The tree is self fertile however yield can benefit from cross fertilization. The fruit can be left on the tree to ripen further which softens the fruit to the point where it can be eaten raw in warmer climates, but should be picked before the first frosts.

Most varieties of quince are too hard, astringent and sour to eat raw unless 'bletted' (softened by frost). They are used to make jam, jelly and quince pudding, or they may be peeled, then roasted, baked or stewed. The flesh of the fruit turns red after a long cooking time. The very strong perfume means they can be added in small quantities to apple pies and jam to enhance the flavour. Adding a diced quince to applesauce will enhance the taste of the applesauce with the chunks of firmer tarter quince. The term "marmalade", originally meaning a quince jam, derives from the Portuguese word for this fruit marmelo.[1] The fruit, like so many others, can be used to make a type of wine.


Devora
On the BTD since April 1999
Teacher
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Jenny
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 8:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swamied Warrior
Ee Dan
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Age: 74
Quoted from Olerica
Oonu!  Welcome!

BTW: Does anyone know why the difference in status between mutton and lamb?  I never see mutton in the grocery (DH is a B so I cook lamb often - even if I don't eat it)


.

I think I read somewhere that it is because the lamb tends to have more fat on or in it. So my solution If I were using sheep meat would be to trim it really carefully.
Someone more knowledgeable may come along.
Cheers, Jenny  




Eating half and exercising double.
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Olerica
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 8:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Joy and Purl Girl: Sriracha is a spectacular chili garlic sauce.  Yep, I know it's an avoid, but dang it, SO flavorful!  More info here:  http://www.huyfong.com/no_frames/sriracha.htm

Jenny: Thanks!  That's the best answer I've rec'd yet!


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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Olerica
Thursday, January 10, 2008, 10:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Ok, guys?  I'm sorry if I faint from happiness but... the ingredients in CHEESE SOUFFLE are SUPERFOODS/Emphasize Foods (if you sub ghee for butter and stock for milk)

OMG!  This and a salad... what a spectacular dinner!!!!

Cheese Souffle Recipe courtesy Alton Brown
Show:  Good Eats
Episode:  Egg Files 5: Souffle-Quantum Foam  
  
Butter, room temperature, for greasing the souffle
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) butter
3 tablespoons flour
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/3 cups milk, hot
4 large egg yolks (2 1/2 ounces by weight)
6 ounces sharp Cheddar
5 egg whites plus 1 tablespoon water (5 1/2 ounces by weight plus 1/2 ounce water)
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

Use room temperature butter to grease an 8-inch souffle mold. Add the grated Parmesan and roll around the mold to cover the sides. Cover with plastic wrap and place into the freezer for 5 minutes.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
In a small saucepan, heat the butter. Allow all of the water to cook out.
In a separate bowl combine the flour, dry mustard, garlic powder, and kosher salt. Whisk this mixture into the melted butter. Cook for 2 minutes.
Whisk in the hot milk and turn the heat to high. Once the mixture reaches a boil, remove from the heat.
In a separate bowl, beat the egg yolks to a creamy consistency. Temper the yolks into the milk mixture, constantly whisking. Remove from the heat and add the cheese. Whisk until incorporated.
In a separate bowl, using a hand mixer, whip the egg whites and cream of tartar until glossy and firm. Add 1/4 of the mixture to the base. Continue to add the whites by thirds, folding very gently.
Pour the mixture into the souffle. Fill the souffle to 1/2-inch from the top. Place on an aluminum pie pan. Bake in the oven for 35 minutes.


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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purlgirl
Saturday, January 12, 2008, 3:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher, non-taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 1,034
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Olerica, I never made a Souffle - is there a trick to it?  - seems like I heard it's hard
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Olerica
Saturday, January 12, 2008, 4:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Purl Girl - It's not too hard, but if it doesn't work, the worst you have is the fanciest scrambled eggs you've ever eaten.  

BTW: Alton Brown's recipes, like the one above have always worked for me.  He's good about teaching people to cook, so despite your experience or lack thereof, you should give it a go!


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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purlgirl
Saturday, January 12, 2008, 12:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher, non-taster
Ee Dan
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Olerica - Thanks for the recipe and encouragement
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Suzanne
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 6:55am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Type O 1st/ Hunter 2nd
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Hello Teachers,
My daughter is concerned about the lack of salad greens on the Teacher food list.  She ate Romaine and spinach daily, and settled for iceburg when necessary in restaurants.  Now spinach and iceburg are listed as avoids.  That alone means salad bars are out.  Romaine is downgraded to neutral.  Does anyone know why?


Good health to you and your household! And good health to all that is yours!  1 Samuel 25:6
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Carol the Dabbler
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 6:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
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Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69

Quoted from Suzanne
My daughter is concerned about the lack of salad greens on the Teacher food list. ... Now spinach and iceburg are listed as avoids.  Romaine is downgraded to neutral.  Does anyone know why?



Apparently it's because Teachers are not entirely synonymous with A-secretors (or A-nonnies, either).  I have no idea why Romaine was downgraded (it was always a Neutral for A-nonnies), but I assume that spinach and iceberg are considered Avoids due to anti-Teacher lectins or something of that sort.

There are actually quite a few salad greens that are at least Neutrals for Teachers -- but your daughter is right: salad bar greens may be another matter!

Let me see.  Among common salad-bar offerings, here are some Teacher Superfoods: Alfalfa sprouts, artichoke hearts (we'll gloss over the fact that they're probably pickled in vinegar), beet roots, cabbage (if you can find it without dressing already added), carrots, commercial mushrooms, onions, and scallions.  There are bound to be some Neutrals, too.  I'll figure out that list, post it in its own thread, then come back here and add some items.

It looks to me like it should be possible to assemble a filling and Teacher-compliant salad from most good salad bars -- as long as you don't mind being short on greens.  It would be more like what's called an Italian salad around here -- chunky rather than leafy.



Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor

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Carol the Dabbler  -  Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 8:44pm
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Carol the Dabbler
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 8:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
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Gender: Female
Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69

OK, I'm back with a few more salad-bar choices.

From the Teacher's Neutral list (see the new thread for more): broccoli and romaine lettuce.

From other Teacher lists: hard-boiled egg, parmesan cheese, green peas, and pinto beans.

... and in a few months, we can all add cauliflower, cucumber, green olives, bell peppers, radishes, and tomatoes.


Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor
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Carol the Dabbler
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 8:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gluten-Free Raw-Food Vegan
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 2,774
Gender: Female
Location: Indiana, USA
Age: 69

... in a few months we can also add (from our other lists) feta cheese, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), kidney beans, and sunflower seeds.

I feel full just thinking about it!



Carol

A+ nonnie married to an A+ secretor
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ABJoe
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 10:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

35% Nomad or Teacher - health history dependent
Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from Olerica
BTW: Does anyone know why the difference in status between mutton and lamb?  I never see mutton in the grocery (DH is a B so I cook lamb often - even if I don't eat it)

Sorry for the delayed response...  I wasn't watching the Teacher thread because we just measured my wife and daughter to determine GenoType...

Lamb is sheep that is less than 1 year old.  Mutton is sheep older than 1 year old.  Since sheep meat gets more gamey tasting as it gets older, most people prefer eating young sheep (lamb) rather than old sheep (mutton).


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
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Drea
Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 10:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI Warrior ~ Taster, NN, ENFJ
Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from Carol the Dabbler
Right -- "goat cheese" isn't listed as either a superfood or a toxin for Teachers, so it must be a Neutral for us.

I wish I could say the same for Warriors... , under Dairy Toxins is a listing for Goat, all types. I tried to spin it in my mind, but I think goat cheese is out for me.



It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Olerica
Thursday, January 17, 2008, 2:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT3 Teacher!
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 576
Gender: Female
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Age: 44
Quoted from ABJoe

Sorry for the delayed response...  I wasn't watching the Teacher thread because we just measured my wife and daughter to determine GenoType...

Lamb is sheep that is less than 1 year old.  Mutton is sheep older than 1 year old.  Since sheep meat gets more gamey tasting as it gets older, most people prefer eating young sheep (lamb) rather than old sheep (mutton).


Thanks... actually I did know WHAT mutton was compared to lamb, I'm wondering WHY the distinction between lamb and mutton.  (One has more fat?


"To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." ee cummings
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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  GT3 Teachers discussion...ch-ch-changes :-)

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