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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Turnips or rutabagas
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Turnips or rutabagas  This thread currently has 1,698 views. Print Print Thread
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Adopted4
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 7:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I've read the typebase index the descriptions of turnips and rutabagas, but I"m still uncertain when I"m grocery shopping which is which. I've seen turnips much more frequently in the stores than rutabagas, but a week ago I was in a grocery store I don't shop in very often and they had rutabagas  (or so I thought). I bought them assuming the label was correct.

The typebase says rutabagas have yellow flesh, and turnips have purple tops with white flesh. What I purchased had a slight purple hue on top, but after peeling I discovered they were white fleshed.

I much prefer to buy rutabagas as they are diamond foods on both my husband's and my SWAMI's, unlike turnips which are both black dots.

I'm a bit perplexed and wonder if employees in grocery stores may not always be accurate in labeling their produce? I've also found that labeling the many different kinds of peppers is often vague and unclear which is relevant for many blood-typers.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
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Lloyd
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 7:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Turnips are smaller and have a white skin with some purple coloring at the top and white flesh.

Rutabaga tends to be larger with a tan or brown skin that is often waxed, and yellowish flesh.
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Spring
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 8:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd
Turnips are smaller and have a white skin with some purple coloring at the top and white flesh.

Rutabaga tends to be larger with a tan or brown skin that is often waxed, and yellowish flesh.

Most of the time the waxing is very noticeable.


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Lola
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 8:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Andrea AWsec
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 8:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Wax is merely applied to keep the moisture inside the rutabaga. Just peel them deeply and boil



MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

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Adopted4
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 9:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Live Life Joyfully 42% Teacher
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The ones I bought were very waxy and large, and looked very much like the rutabagas in the wiki link Lola provided. Still, I wonder why the purple hue was so pale as well as the flesh. Maybe they were nutritionally deficient, thus the lack of color.

I used them in a pot of Ukrainian borscht and everyone really enjoyed the addition, particularly because they tasted like regular potatoes, something I never buy anymore (we do eat sweet potatoes though).

Andrea, I will boil my rutabagas whole next time. The way I prepared them was by peeling and then cutting them into bite sized pieces. WOW, I was afraid I was going to cut my hand open as they were very tough to cut up, unlike potatoes. I"ll never do that again!


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
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san j
Saturday, April 27, 2013, 10:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I like either vegetable roasted.


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BCgal
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 1:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Steaming them is good too.



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BluesSinger
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 2:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
I like either vegetable roasted.


wow! I have to try this... does it take away the bitterness?
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san j
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 2:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I don't find them bitter.
But you can be creative with a marinade/"baste". No reason you can't sweeten them with a touch of honey or apple juice or "compliant" agent. Or simply roast with other vegetables that are sweet, such as parsnips, carrots, winter squash, or sweet onions.


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BluesSinger
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 5:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
I don't find them bitter.
But you can be creative with a marinade/"baste". No reason you can't sweeten them with a touch of honey or apple juice or "compliant" agent. Or simply roast with other vegetables that are sweet, such as parsnips, carrots, winter squash, or sweet onions.


Well I'm a supertaster and they are bitter!  or maybe i'm getting 'old' ones.  
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Lloyd
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 5:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BluesSinger


Well I'm a supertaster and they are bitter!  or maybe i'm getting 'old' ones.  


They are bitter but rutabaga is the more bland of the two.

Cooking removes the bitterness. Rutabaga makes nice baked 'fries'.

There is no need to sweeten.
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san j
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 6:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd


They are bitter but rutabaga is the more bland of the two.

Cooking removes the bitterness. Rutabaga makes nice baked 'fries'.

There is no need to sweeten.

For you and me, Lloyd, there is "no need to sweeten".
But if she finds them bitter when cooked in other ways and wants to try roasting, including with sweeter vegetables as I suggested, or even with a fruit juice spray/glaze, etc., she may prefer them thus "sweetened"; her tastes are "individual": Power to her.  



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Lloyd
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Quoted from san j

For you and me, Lloyd, there is "no need to sweeten".
But if she finds them bitter when cooked in other ways and wants to try roasting, including with sweeter vegetables as I suggested, or even with a fruit juice spray/glaze, etc., she may prefer them thus "sweetened"; her tastes are "individual": Power to her.  



I am a supertaster and cognizant of the bitter taste of the raw vegetable.  

When fully cooked there is no bitter taste. Therefore there is no reason to sweeten or do any other flavoring in an attempt to cover up bitterness. As addressed. I would hate for someone to use sugar for the wrong reason.

If someone chooses to sweeten because they like things sweet - that is another story.
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ruthiegirl
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 7:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Salt is often more effective at modulating the bitter taste than sugar is. If it seems  bitter to you, try adding a bit of sea salt and see if that makes it taste better.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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san j
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 9:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I used to roast rutabagas with, as I said, sweeter root vegetables, adding a touch of miso, back in the day when I used to eat miso. It delivers the "sweet via salt" phenomenon of which ruthiegirl writes, BluesSinger, so maybe that'll be your ticket!  


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Lloyd
Sunday, April 28, 2013, 11:49pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
Salt is often more effective at modulating the bitter taste than sugar is. If it seems  bitter to you, try adding a bit of sea salt and see if that makes it taste better.


Interesting idea.

Of course, used in soup or stew there would be no concern.

Fully cooked rutabaga is also an excellent potato substitute and can be served mashed with or without the normal toppings. While some use salt there are many of us who cannot or should not add salt.
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BluesSinger
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Quoted from Lloyd


Interesting idea.

Of course, used in soup or stew there would be no concern.

Fully cooked rutabaga is also an excellent potato substitute and can be served mashed with or without the normal toppings. While some use salt there are many of us who cannot or should not add salt.


Hi there!  No I would not want to sweeten as I have found that Rutabaga and Turnips cooked in Soup actually sweeten up nicely and the bitterness leaves.  I was just concerned that would not happen when roasting!  I can't wait to try them.  Any suggestions for making fries?  i.e. How thin do they need to be to get crispy, what oil to toss them in?  

and salt?  yes you betcha!  

I'm ALWAYS looking for ways to get more vegies in my routine so this is exciting!
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Lloyd
Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BluesSinger


Any suggestions for making fries?  i.e. How thin do they need to be to get crispy, what oil to toss them in?  

and salt?  yes you betcha!  

I'm ALWAYS looking for ways to get more vegies in my routine so this is exciting!


The thinner they are the faster they cook and the more they crisp.

I use a light coating of spray olive oil with my favorite herbs at about 400 for about an hour, turning about halfway through. You may have to experiment or keep a close eye the first time or two.

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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:14am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd


The thinner they are the faster they cook and the more they crisp.

I use a light coating of spray olive oil with my favorite herbs at about 400 for about an hour, turning about halfway through. You may have to experiment or keep a close eye the first time or two.



Thank you Lloyd!  It's so good when you respond!  I love to see you on the boards as you are a long timer with lots of experience like Lola.  I miss some of the folks who have dropped away.  There use to be young gal who knew alot about cooking.. I can't remember her name for the life of me.. I have not seen her on the boards for quite sometime... she sent me some Tumeric one time... I think she got pregnant and had a baby while she was on line as well... Do you know of whom I speak?

Oh I know.. wasn't it Ribbit???  or Ribbit something?
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san j
Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:20am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd


The thinner they are the faster they cook and the more they crisp.

I use a light coating of spray olive oil with my favorite herbs at about 400 for about an hour, turning about halfway through. You may have to experiment or keep a close eye the first time or two.


Lloyd, I'm remembering a rutabaga pie or something like that that you blogged about, maybe last year? I recall your providing a photo; I thought, Now that looks great!
BluesSinger, may you enjoy your rutabagas (the Brits call 'em "swedes"?), no matter how you prep 'em!



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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j

Lloyd, I'm remembering a rutabaga pie or something like that that you blogged about, maybe last year? I recall your providing a photo; I thought, Now that looks great!
BluesSinger, may you enjoy your rutabagas (the Brits call 'em "swedes"?), no matter how you prep 'em!



Thank you Sanj!  And yes LLOYD!!! The pie recipe please!!!
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san j
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http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2012/04/29/wine-and-cheese?blog=41
That's where I saw the picture...posted one year ago tomorrow.


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BluesSinger
Monday, April 29, 2013, 12:54am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2012/04/29/wine-and-cheese?blog=41
That's where I saw the picture...posted one year ago tomorrow.


In the thread comments below the above thread I found this and with a few adjustments I could have a great pie! Whoa.. can't wait to try this out!!!

http://www.artandlemons.com/2009/02/a-modest-root.html
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BluesSinger
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These are the ingredients for the cream on the pie in the above link:

do you think I could make this with almonds or walnuts?

Sweet Cashew Cream
1 cup raw cashews
1/8 cup brown rice syrup
1/8 cup maple syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup soy milk (to make a thicker “whipped” cream, use 1/4 cup soy milk)
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