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Yoga for o's  This thread currently has 1,722 views. Print Print Thread
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Easy E
Sunday, September 2, 2012, 1:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+ Explorer, non-secretor
Ee Dan
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Location: Lafayette, LA
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The meat requires more energy to digest, and more blood and body energy will go to the stomach area and away from the brain and muscles to help digest it.  

You can try practicing at different times of the day and night and see how you feel during those times.  I don't do yoga, but do qigong and basic tai chi exercises as a supplement to bike riding and martial arts.  
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ruthiegirl
Tuesday, September 4, 2012, 6:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from ambermac


I'm of chinese descent but live in Australia.
I think my main problem is that I commit hard for three weeks to a new diet/exercise plan and then sort of just give up and do whatever I want before I can see proper results, hopefully not this time!


The key is to go easy on yourself. Make slow, livable changes instead of "jumping in with both feet" and then completely abandoning the changes a few weeks later. Give yourself permission to ease in slowly, and to have the occasional "cheat meal."

One burger on a bun with fries isn't going to completely derail you, if you get back on track the next meal, or at least a few days later. There's a difference between "stumbling a little bit" and "failing at the diet." It's a mental difference, not a physical one.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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ambermac
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 4:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl


The key is to go easy on yourself. Make slow, livable changes instead of "jumping in with both feet" and then completely abandoning the changes a few weeks later. Give yourself permission to ease in slowly, and to have the occasional "cheat meal."

One burger on a bun with fries isn't going to completely derail you, if you get back on track the next meal, or at least a few days later. There's a difference between "stumbling a little bit" and "failing at the diet." It's a mental difference, not a physical one.


Thanks Ruth!! This makes me feel so much better, sometimes when I deviate from my SWAMI even in small amounts I fear for my health even though I know that some of the avoids in small amounts don't do me any major damage. Or that all my hard work has gone to waste because I had a small serve of yoghurt... Obviously I'm not going to just assume I can have as many cheat meals as I want from now on, but its nice having someone tell you I'm allowed to indulge!!

Has anyone worked out a good system where they occasionally allow avoids? What frequency is recommended? (sorry bit off the thread's topic)
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 4:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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A little bit of an "avoid" might hurt you, but it won't hurt you as much as completely ignoring the diet. You need to decide for yourself just how much you want to let yourself "cheat"- too much can lead to physical cravings and make it harder to stick to the plan. OTOH, being too rigid leaves you vulnerable to giving up. Perhaps allowing yourself one "cheat meal" per week (though do try to minimize the worst avoids, even when eating away from home) may help you stay on track.

The main thing is how you react after cheating. Dust yourself off and get back on track. Know that you may have slowed down progress, but you haven't destroyed it.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Kristin
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 4:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Hmmm.. interesting topic. I've been practicing yoga on and off since the 80's with a steady practice of yoga about 4-5 times per week the last several years. I am also a yoga teacher. I have never personally felt the need to relinquish meat from my diet but I have felt the pressure from the yoga community to not only practice vegetarianism but veganism as the highest ideal. The purists will point to the yamas (restraints) and claim that ahimsa (nonviolence) includes the practice of vegetarianism. But from my studies, no where in the yoga sutras does it advocate for a vegetarian diet. So I can say with clarity from where I am now that I will always be a meat-eating yogi.  

I have noticed that with age and also correcting a B12 assimilation issue, my meat consumption has decreased a bit from when I was younger. But I can't ever see myself giving up animal flesh entirely. It just is not healthy for me. Period. And that's what really counts for me... not following some ascribed philosophy.


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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Easy E
Wednesday, September 5, 2012, 5:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ee Dan
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Quoted from Easy E
The meat requires more energy to digest, and more blood and body energy will go to the stomach area and away from the brain and muscles to help digest it.  

You can try practicing at different times of the day and night and see how you feel during those times.  I don't do yoga, but do qigong and basic tai chi exercises as a supplement to bike riding and martial arts.  


Needing more energy to break down does not mean bad for you either. But more meats take more digestive power to assimilate initially.

When starting yoga or something like that, focus takes awhile to develop and takes awhile to get strong in that type of way too.

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Victoria
Thursday, September 6, 2012, 3:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sun Beh Nim
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Quoted from Kristin
Hmmm.. interesting topic. I've been practicing yoga on and off since the 80's with a steady practice of yoga about 4-5 times per week the last several years. I am also a yoga teacher. I have never personally felt the need to relinquish meat from my diet but I have felt the pressure from the yoga community to not only practice vegetarianism but veganism as the highest ideal. The purists will point to the yamas (restraints) and claim that ahimsa (nonviolence) includes the practice of vegetarianism. But from my studies, no where in the yoga sutras does it advocate for a vegetarian diet. So I can say with clarity from where I am now that I will always be a meat-eating yogi.  

I have noticed that with age and also correcting a B12 assimilation issue, my meat consumption has decreased a bit from when I was younger. But I can't ever see myself giving up animal flesh entirely. It just is not healthy for me. Period. And that's what really counts for me... not following some ascribed philosophy.


This is similar to my story.  I was a yoga instructor for more than 20 years and a vegetarian during that time.  I felt awesome in the first few years of staying away from meat but my health began to go downhill in just about every way.  Through it all, I was able to meditate deeply and had great flexibility, even though I was losing muscle tone, immune balance and digestive integrity.  Not to mention, I battled depression also.  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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san j
Thursday, September 6, 2012, 6:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I think this is all a testimony to the need for Balance in areas other than diet.

There needs to be Balance, too, in the decision-making process regarding one's health.
To wit: What is the place of physical health in your life?
Is it absolutely paramount? Does everything have less primacy?

Os do, on a broad scale, have a certain amount of statistical longevity to their benefit. But they may find daily intense workouts and the consumption (and purchase and preparation) of large quantities of animal flesh to be distracting from other priorities, such as a certain spiritual consciousness they had been cultivating heretofore or aspire to pursue now or in the future.

Another way of looking at it is: Do I want to live to be 105 like Grandpa? Is that what it means to "win" at Life? Or, in the end, if I die at 85 having felt mentally better without all the beef...
(I don't know: I'm just proposing thought-tracks that might differ from the "100% Lockstep" model.)

There are gods other than SWAMI. Some may discover a conflict of interest between their gods/faiths, and, IMO, they should use the findings of Peter D'Adamo in such manner as they can live the Balance that fulfills them, even if no one else.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
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Averno
Friday, September 7, 2012, 1:16am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from san j
I think this is all a testimony to the need for Balance in areas other than diet.

There needs to be Balance, too, in the decision-making process regarding one's health.
To wit: What is the place of physical health in your life?
Is it absolutely paramount? Does everything have less primacy?

Os do, on a broad scale, have a certain amount of statistical longevity to their benefit. But they may find daily intense workouts and the consumption (and purchase and preparation) of large quantities of animal flesh to be distracting from other priorities, such as a certain spiritual consciousness they had been cultivating heretofore or aspire to pursue now or in the future.

Another way of looking at it is: Do I want to live to be 105 like Grandpa? Is that what it means to "win" at Life? Or, in the end, if I die at 85 having felt mentally better without all the beef...
(I don't know: I'm just proposing thought-tracks that might differ from the "100% Lockstep" model.)

There are gods other than SWAMI. Some may discover a conflict of interest between their gods/faiths, and, IMO, they should use the findings of Peter D'Adamo in such manner as they can live the Balance that fulfills them, even if no one else.  


Well said. Brava!
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