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Food Channel  This thread currently has 5,605 views. Print Print Thread
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gulfcoastguy
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 10:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Tonight is Chopped night!
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Averno
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 11:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from san j

Please elaborate - I'd like to understand your point, but this is very vague.


I wish to say that until we seriously question the bond we've made with a food industry that makes us ill, a pharmaceutical industry that pushes the fix, and the near inevitability of passing through our hospital industry as a result, we will continue to at least some degree on the current track. At our increasing peril.

To this point, I do not believe that these industries can deliver us from this peril. Especially not in the guise of education unless recognizing the crucial differences of blood type specific nutrition, medication and treatment. We know better.

Long to short-- any one-size-fits-all approach to nutrition, medication and treatment fails far too often. We shouldn't have to settle for playing the odds when they're so often stacked against us. Pass it on...


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chrissyA
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 11:40pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The whole point of that show, I believe, is to demonstrate what impact diet can have on specific health conditions - like, but more effictively than medication. The health practioners asked the patients not to change any of their medications for the duration of their time on the show, so that the only changes the patients were making were dietary, strictly to demonstrate the effectiveness of diet as medication.

Obviously, we as BTD, GTD, and SWAMI'ers believe that the answers are even more specialized, but it was a very positive step in the right direction


SWAMI
“Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.” --Hippocrates (460-377 B.C.)

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chrissyA  -  Wednesday, January 23, 2013, 4:52am
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san j
Tuesday, January 29, 2013, 11:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oh, dear.
In the quest to create Food-oriented reality programs, I guess it was inevitable:
A show called Man v. Food.
Adam Richman stuffs his trap with unbelievably obscene amounts of food, rendering it no more Food but just --- stuffing ---

The only things I "like" about the show are:

Visiting some locations
Learning history of some dishes
Richman's sense of humor, both as actor and writer
The "stadium" fan-psychology of the spectators

The face-stuffing challenge that ends every program is difficult to watch, however.
It's sheer madness and may make you angry/sick.

(Admittedly the show is on "Travel Channel", not "Food Channel".)


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san j  -  Tuesday, January 29, 2013, 11:29pm
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san j
Friday, March 8, 2013, 8:42pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just watched Ann Burrell's show for the first time.
I have never, never with my own eyes, witnessed more extravagant use of salt. It was truly outstanding. If she'd shaken it all into a bowl instead of here and there on the food, she'd have had enough to form a "snowball" and knock out a full-grown adult.
She's got a restaurant.
If you go, make sure to say, "Low salt" or "No Salt, please."


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gulfcoastguy
Monday, March 11, 2013, 12:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
I just watched Ann Burrell's show for the first time.
I have never, never with my own eyes, witnessed more extravagant use of salt. It was truly outstanding. If she'd shaken it all into a bowl instead of here and there on the food, she'd have had enough to form a "snowball" and knock out a full-grown adult.
She's got a restaurant.
If you go, make sure to say, "Low salt" or "No Salt, please."


One of the most common comments on Chopped " underseasoned, Did you put any salt on it?" Not that I agree with the contestants but they are playing to the judges.

On a sidenote, if you want to offend me, just reach for the salt shaker before tasting food that I've cooked. That or ask for ketchup.
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san j
Monday, March 11, 2013, 12:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Salt is a very important ingredient.
I agree with you that salting without tasting is not a constructive habit.


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san j
Thursday, March 21, 2013, 9:50am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Iron Chef America's "Battle Salmon" (Morimoto vs. Douglas) was a good one. They used Chinook salmon, and many of the dishes were mindblowingly creative / original.


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san j
Friday, March 22, 2013, 7:38pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Has anyone seen the show "The Taste"?


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ABJoe
Friday, March 22, 2013, 10:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yes, we watched "The Taste".  My WW and DD enjoyed it very much.  

I couldn't write fast enough when they were describing their dishes to remember much of how they put them together, so I didn't feel I got much out of it.


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san j
Saturday, March 23, 2013, 12:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ABJoe
Yes, we watched "The Taste".  My WW and DD enjoyed it very much.  

I couldn't write fast enough when they were describing their dishes to remember much of how they put them together, so I didn't feel I got much out of it.


Usually there's a website for the episodes?
Just saw one episode - the Finale.
Kin'a wacky.



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Peppermint Twist
Saturday, March 23, 2013, 1:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
Has anyone seen the show "The Taste"?


It's hideous.  It is trying to be "Chopped", yet is so NOT.  I deem it UNWATCHABLE.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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san j
Saturday, March 23, 2013, 1:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Chopped insists upon the integrity of the Accepted Form: The Meal, made up of courses, each represented by The Plate, consisting of: dishes that are balanced, whole plates that are balanced, and whole dinners that contain balanced progression.

The Taste, on the other hand, throws the Plate to the wind and says its contents can be reduced to one large spoonful that can be tasted and judged, showing - IMO - great disrespect for the individual components of the plate, not to mention the process and enjoyment of dining. (Watching the judges play "Gag Me With A [Huge] Spoon"...ain't pretty.   )
Yes: There's something obscene about watching a renowned top chef stuff into his/her mouth all the components of a dinner plate at once.  
Kinda like Man Vs. Food for Sophisticates.


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gulfcoastguy
Saturday, March 23, 2013, 3:09am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The copies are seldom as good as the original.
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san j
Monday, March 25, 2013, 7:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Continuing re: The Taste, it has certainly made me think about the character and composition of the individual bite, something I don't ordinarily consider in such relief.

My breakfast this morning consisted of a toasted onion bagel, upon which sat (in this order):
Cream Cheese, red onion arcs, minced peperoncini, and flakes of Pepper-crusted Alaskan kippered salmon. On the side, there were segments of red grapefruit.

I thought about the show as I ate, and how the "sandwich" format suits it. I could appreciate the fatty, rich creaminess of the cream cheese and how it could handle the salty pungency of the peperoncini, balance the crunchy succulence and flavor of the onion, and soothe the smokiness of the black-peppered fish, all while hydrating/smoothing the toasty/nutty bagel half.

The influence of that reality show made me wonder about the very essential grapefruit - how it would have changed the character of the open-face sandwich to have placed morsels of the grapefruit directly upon the sandwich. Normally I do squirt some lemon upon it so - would it be a go?

And I determined: No. I preferred taking the grapefruit on in a larger chunk, at least half a section at a time, to deliver the texture and the juice-punch I was seeking, as well as to titillate the mouth in the process. As for acidity, the peperoncini provided that. What chunks of ripe citrus fruit would have done to the consistency of the essential bread was not a pretty thought, either.

Sandwiches are the quintessential format for a "Taste" -- one-stop shopping/biting/tasting -- but, even there, the little trips around the plate are important.

The Japanese understand this perfectly. One fascinating aspect of Japanese cooking is the Deconstruction it entails - the separation, first of all, of the entire meal into different courses based upon cooking method for one thing, and then the isolation of individual components (sometimes literally into "boxes") to be appreciated thus. It's how one then very consciously combines the separate that renders Japanese dining the journey/adventure it is for the individual diner, as well as for the chef. Use of only the finest ingredients is what permits this activity to be so enjoyable.
Unless tastes are going to be of such historically-refined forms as The Sandwich or some of our modern complicated Sushis (which, for similar reasons, can be confusing bites), The Taste simply has to force its contestants to defy all of their training and ignore Process as well as Mouthfeel.

As ever, I am learning even from the shows I'm finding most bizarre.


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san j  -  Monday, March 25, 2013, 10:52pm
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san j
Sunday, March 31, 2013, 1:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I have seen a few episodes of Tony Bourdain's [A Cook's Tour and liked it terribly!
Both for this cook and for this B, there were thrills to be had - in the Sahara, in Fez, in Tokyo.
Each episode is only about 20 minutes long, but the traditional dishes are prepared and served and eaten off the beaten track.
I recommend it!


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san j
Sunday, March 31, 2013, 11:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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On an episode of A Cook's Tour, Tony Bourdain explains how a nabe dish (like yosenabe/sukiyaki) -whereby one cooks the various prepped ingredients in the broth at the table- transforms the longer it remains on the table, adding the dimension of Time to taste.

Just extraordinary.

He was sampling typical Chanko fare (sumo-wrestler food) at a training-house in Tokyo, curious about how these huge guys are fattened/fed. Check out "Chanko" if you're interested.

Here's a very nice, thorough webpage (with pictures) about nabe, aka Japanese "hot pot"/one-pot cooking.
http://www.gnavi.co.jp/en/articles/japanese_cuisine/nabe/


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san j
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 10:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I just watched an episode of Barefoot Contessa...
I personally learned nothing from the show.
There's all this superfluous banter between Ina and her friend, making chili with her. The pink grapefruit margaritas looked good, however.
But I can definitely see where, if I didn't know how to cook and felt intimidated by other shows, I'd really appreciate the slowness of the show.

S-s-s-l-l-l-o-o-o-w-w-w.
It made me wonder if other cooking shows appear "too fast" to the beginner, shows on which the cook accomplishes 4x as much in the same, oh, 20 minutes of footage.
But considering you can always Replay the video, at any point, that might not be critical.

Did anyone here learn much from Ina Garten?


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gulfcoastguy
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 11:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I haven't watched much tv lately including the food channel. I'd rather be on the internet, read, or dig into my backlog of unwatched dvds.
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Adam
Friday, April 12, 2013, 12:26am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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san j... I'm a huge Bourdain fan.  He eats and drinks (and smokes) some god-awful unhealthy stuff sometimes, but I love his humor, intellect, and style.  He has also contributed to the tv show Treme, a fictional drama on HBO about post-Katrina New Orleans.  Highly recommended.  I have not traveled in years, but when I do, it will be New Orleans.
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gulfcoastguy
Friday, April 12, 2013, 3:28am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Adam I was there last saturday. It is pretty difficult to stay anywhere in the neighborhood of on diet there. For instance there is a little bar there by Boubon St called Yo Momma's that makes the best burgers. Their speciality is the peanutbutter burger but I at least had the chilli cheese. Hmmm? there is a good sushi shop at the corner of Decatur and Iberville so maybe an A could stay on diet. It's right next to a good creole place called Olivier's.
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Adam
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Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Adam I was there last saturday. It is pretty difficult to stay anywhere in the neighborhood of on diet there. For instance there is a little bar there by Boubon St called Yo Momma's that makes the best burgers. Their speciality is the peanutbutter burger but I at least had the chilli cheese. Hmmm? there is a good sushi shop at the corner of Decatur and Iberville so maybe an A could stay on diet. It's right next to a good creole place called Olivier's.


...I know what you mean...trust me, I'd completely throw out the diet during a stay in New Orleans.  I'd probably pass on pork and beef, but I'd devour everything else in sight.
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san j
Saturday, May 4, 2013, 11:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Heat Seekers: The Atlanta program featured a fish house called "Six Feet Under" whose co-owner prepared and served up a "Six-Pepper Shrimp and Grits" recipe, with blackened seared shrimp, roasted corn salad, fresh red pepper and cilantro, and a roasted habanero cream sauce, that looked well balanced and delicious. When the hosts tasted it, they didn't sweat and heat-posture at all, but said it was really satisfying. Unfortunately, the dish's profile doesn't give a compliant B any room to maneuver  .

The second of Nancy's two TV offerings was: "Dragon Toes": Bacon-wrapped poppers, using habaneros, each stuffed with a scallop, wrapped with bacon, skewered and baked. No sauce, no marinating, nothing else! Talk about easy - and it could be reproduced using turkey bacon.
To my taste, however, I like a crisper bacon than she delivered. The cool meatiness of the scallop absorbs some of the habanero heat - but not all, for sure.   Nonetheless: Beneficial Nomad Heat!

The other recipes/dishes submitted by other restaurants on the Atlanta program were far, far hotter, and one featured pork-belly anyway.
But the submissions of Six Feet Under (across the street from an historic cemetery) were attractive to me and obviously to customers who appreciate a classic with added punch. If you like to work with/ eat hotter peppers than most, and are O and/or can figure out a way to go with heat-creaminess, blackening spices, seafood and a warm comfort mush, with some fresh succulence, chime in. I'm getting ideas, myself, and am glad I saw this!

And next time you're in Atlanta, go Six Feet Under.  


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san j
Sunday, May 12, 2013, 7:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I saw an episode of Throwdown with Bobby Flay about huevos rancheros, in which Bobby went up against a Mexican-American and his mother in Tucson, Arizona and their multi-generational recipe from Oaxaca. This family owns a restaurant in Tucson that is packed for breakfast and brunch and where this dish reigns.

Though Bobby is famous for mastering this particular cuisine, I didn't think his dish appeared as appetizing as the one he admitted was "more authentic, traditional". He acknowledged that he likes to innovate. This he did by omitting beans (which he regretted, his opponent using refried pintos), using chorizo deglazed with red wine and a deep, dark red-brown sauce of various powdered chiles. Over the top he poured a small amount of lime crema.

The opponent used a fresh green chile (cooked) salsa and homemade corn tortillas; I looked longingly at both of these ingredients. Also used was a mixed shredded cheese. This construction overflowed and filled the plate like a real Comfort Food entry, whereas Bobby's was more dry and compact (though the yolks did run) and could be picked up with one hand, more like an appetizer.

Surprise of surprises: The judges, both local Arizonans, chose Bobby's!
Folks, it just goes to show there is no substitute for Taste. Everyone was raving over the deep wine-y chorizo, how it more than compensated for beanlessness.

As I begin to appreciate the egg more, I may refer back to this contest in my mind more than once in future.


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san j
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I don't know which channel Big Bites is on, but here was a good B-adaptable one, for the grill.

He uses chicken breasts, but turkey would be fine - The meat is marinated in plenty of jalapeño-spiked tequila and red peppers, oregano, lime juice, etc.

He serves it on a grill-toasted roll with mayo, peppers, and cabbage.
Accompaniment: Roasted stuffed poblano chiles that are then put under the broiler to melt the covering cheese. Filling can and should be improvised. He uses a blend of chorizo (I'd choose the beef chorizo), rice, onions, bell pepper, garlic. There's a wine deglaze. He puts some prawns in the filling - I'd leave it out entirely, not substituting anything for it.

He serves a watermelon cocktail.
I would serve a slaw on the side; not sure if that on the sandwich is really sufficient.

I was impressed by all the B-friendly foods in there: All the chiles, bell peppers, cabbage, and even watermelon!

Substitutes: Turkey for chicken, beef chorizo for pork. B's who don't eat wheat could perhaps use a spelt bun, or do without the bread altogether and serve that cabbage topping as, yes, a dressed slaw.

If you like grilling, and/or if you like peppers, this was a pretty good show.
See gulfcoastguy's Tequila thread for more on this spirit.


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