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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Soaking and drying nuts?
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Soaking and drying nuts?  This thread currently has 5,951 views. Print Print Thread
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ABJoe
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 9:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
Can I dehydrate these things in my convection oven at 150 degrees?! I haven't been able to find anything in my book about it! HELP!!!!

I guess it depends on whether you want the enzymes to still be active...  Most raw proponents say that anything over about 100 degrees will kill the enzymes...  

If you don't care about the enzymes, then there is no problem with drying them at a higher temperature, as long as you don't burn them...


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Spring
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 9:51pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ABJoe
I guess it depends on whether you want the enzymes to still be active...  Most raw proponents say that anything over about 100 degrees will kill the enzymes...  

If you don't care about the enzymes, then there is no problem with drying them at a higher temperature, as long as you don't burn them...

I started to do a correction on that temp but I thought someone mentioned 170 degrees. My convec. will actually work down to 100 degrees. So that should work just fine, I hope! Thanks!!----Oh, and I want all the enzymes I can get!! I know a 92 year old man who has been careful about his diet for decades, and he is a great believer in enzemes, as he calls them! We are always cautioning each other about getting those enzemes!!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Conor
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 9:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
Can I dehydrate these things in my convection oven at 150 degrees?! I haven't been able to find anything in my book about it! HELP!!!!

Spring, am cross posting something I wrote on another thread because it's relevant to your question (the key is keeping your oven door cracked open during the drying process) ...
Quoted Text
Alternately, if you don't have a dehydrator, you can accomplish pretty much the same thing by setting your conventional oven to its lowest setting (most are 170-degrees but some of the newer ones will allow you to adjust them even lower). Let the oven warm up to temperature with the door closed and, in the meantime, lay out the walnuts single-layer on one or two cookie sheets. Once your oven has warmed to temperature, place cookie sheets on oven racks and leave oven door cracked open two to three inches. This should allow a gentle heat to evaporate the walnuts without destroying their enzymes or harming their flavor (actually, I find that soaking and dehydrating really enhances the flavor while minimizing any inherent bitterness).



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Conor
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 9:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
My convec. will actually work down to 100 degrees ....

Then your oven will work just fine without the door open. I start checking for preferred dryness after about an hour.



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What is food to one man is bitter poison to others. ~ Titus Lucretius Carus
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Spring
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 10:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Conor

Spring, am cross posting something I wrote on another thread because it's relevant to your question (the key is keeping your oven door cracked open during the drying process) ...

You can see now where I posted that it will work at 100 degrees. Thanks for setting me straight, though, about how you can actually do this with an oven that gets too hot! You would think that I would have finished reading your whole post after I printed it out!! I can't wait to try these things! Glad I am "sort of" getting this together! Thanks, again!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Spring
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 10:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Wow! An hour! This is getting better and better!  


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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Conor
Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 10:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Spring
Thanks, again!

My pleasure, and bon appétit! (:



Compliant, me?!? ... I even attended a university whose mascot is one of my ◆ Superfoods!
What is food to one man is bitter poison to others. ~ Titus Lucretius Carus
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Spring
Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 4:45pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My walnuts turned out totally delish! Maybe beginner's luck, but I'm satisfied with that for now!!! Thanks for all the help, y'all!!


"We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -- Benjamin Franklin
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BHealthy
Sunday, September 16, 2012, 7:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I am resurrecting this thread to add some info I just learned and to ask one additional question.

How I prepare our nuts:

If you soak them and then don't dry them thoroughly before returning them to their original container, they will mold.  I learned this the hard way.  Now, I dry them for as long as I soak them.  If I soak for 2 days, I dry for 2 days.  I use our oven and set it to 118f.  Pumpkin seeds seem to take longer to dry -- a 4 hour soak may require 2 days in the oven.  I dust them with cayenne and/or garlic powder and/or cumin and roast until I no longer detect any moisture in the nut.

Regardless of how long I soak the nuts, I change the water every 8 hours, rinse thoroughly, and add a little Himalayan salt each time.  I use the water from my Reverse Osmosis filter as I don't want any of the chemicals and contaminants in tap water leaching into my nuts.

This site, http://www.yogitrition.com/soaking-grains-beans-nuts-and-seeds-101/ , recommends soaking walnuts in food-grade hydrogen peroxide first, to remove any mold.  I have not done that yet but may try it and see how they taste.  That site also lists the optimum length and temperature for soaking most nuts, grains, and beans.

Regarding whether to soak and/or roast nuts:

The reason we are advised to soak nuts is to remove phytic acid which strongly inhibits mineral absorption in adults and interferes with enzymes we need to digest our food.  Nuts are higher in phytic acid than either beans or grains.

http://chriskresser.com/another-reason-you-shouldnt-go-nuts-on-nuts

Based on research done with chickpeas, soaking will remove some but not all of the phytic acid.  Dehydrating and then roasting will remove the rest IF you roast at 140f or higher.  Supposedly, that temperature does not alter the nature of the delicate oils in the nuts but it will kill some of the other nutrients.

So, there is a tradeoff.  You need to decide how much phytic acid you can live with.  This guy, http://www.marksdailyapple.com/nuts-and-phytic-acid/, doesn't think we need to worry about it in the small quantities that nuts are generally eaten.

And that brings me to my question:

My SWAMI lists only "walnuts" as a diamond.  It does not specify "walnuts, soaked" as it does for both lentils and pinto beans.  Nor does it specify that they should be either raw or roasted. LR4YT states walnuts are beneficial for every blood type because they inhibit ODC.  Which part of the walnut inhibits ODC?  

Walnuts are quite bitter.  It is known that bitter foods offer many nutritional benefits: http://www.myindigestionremedies.com/bitter-foods-for-better-digestion.  

This Whole Foods web page, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=99 , says that 90% of the phenols in walnuts are found in the bitter skin which should not be removed.  

When I soak walnuts, they lose most of their bitterness.  Do they then also lose most of their benefits?  Is the bitterness the reason walnuts are so beneficial?

The Whole Foods website goes on to say that the vitamin E in walnuts is the more unusual and  beneficial gamma-tocopherol AND that, "Some phytonutrients found in walnuts - for example, the quinone juglone - are found in virtually no other commonly-eaten foods. Other phytonutrients - like the tannin tellimagrandin or the flavonol morin - are also rare and valuable as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. "

Are any one, or all, of these the mechanism by which walnuts inhibit ODC?  Does soaking remove the phenols as well as the phytates?  Do the quinones, tannins and flavonols also leach into the soaking water?  This site, http://nutgourmet.wordpress.com/category/nut-studies/, says it's the tannins that give walnuts their bitterness and that they are removed by soaking.

The only reference I could find to walnuts and ODC was in this book, http://books.google.com/books?.....boxylase&f=false by R. A. S. Hemat.  It states, "Foods that inhibit ODC include walnuts, curcumin, green tea, pomegranates, guava, broccoli leaves, plantain, black currant fruit, bilberry, elderberry, grapes, onion, garlic, dill, tarragon, and chives."  No explanation is given.

In addition, it is known that phytates do offer some health benefits: http://www.longecity.org/forum/topic/42203-health-benefits-of-phytic-acid/.  

So, should I be eating my walnuts soaked or not?


"Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical, and expecting more than others think is possible."

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BHealthy  -  Monday, September 17, 2012, 5:02pm
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